Haunting Forest Hills Cemetery with Photographer Liz Kelleher…

October 30th, 2009 § 5 comments § permalink

Liz Forest Hills 'Meet Me at the Cemetery Gates'

“The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague.      Who shall say where one ends, and where the other begins?”                                              – Edgar Allan Poe,  Premature Burial,  1844

Liz Forest Hills 'Double Cross'

In celebration of All Hallows’ Eve, The Gardener’s Eden proudly presents a ghostly photographic tour of the Forest Hills Cemetery through the eyes of artist Liz Kelleher. No Halloween ever feels complete without a twilight stroll through a shadowy, mysterious graveyard. And what better haunt than a lonely old cemetery in the heart of New England?

Welcome to Forest Hills Cemetery, located in a quiet corner of Boston, Massachusetts. This historic, Victorian-style landmark was designed in 1848. Planned and operated as a living-memorial, Forest Hills Cemetery is an active burial ground within a magnificent 275 acre landscape. Today this beautiful and haunting place serves many purposes. The cemetery includes an impressive arboretum, winding paths, modern and historic sculpture and a quiet body of water known as Lake Hibiscus. As an outdoor museum, the cemetery gives us a glimpse into another world – a time long gone. Perhaps overshadowed by the far more famous Mt. Auburn Cemetery in nearby Cambridge, this somewhat forgotten and always eerie ‘garden of memories’ is also the eternal home and final resting place of many historic Boston figures. These souls include activists, (such as William Lloyd Garrison and Lucy Stone), poets, playwrights, (including Anne Sexton, ee cummings, Eugene O’Neil and Martin Milmore), and other famous, late-citizens of New England…

Liz Forest Hills 'Red Death'

Liz K. Late Bloom Among the Late Citizens

So now… Take Liz’s hand as she drifts through the empty garden. Brush close against the cold tombs, like the ivy and hydrangea, which caress the solemn angels as they silently guard the spirits within the iron gate. What souls watch as we make our way past the towering celtic crosses, tiny headstones and lost lambs? Can you hear the long ago voices in the whispering wind and the callous croaking of the crow? Watch as ancient trees bow down; hovering above the chilly, stone-mourners as their shadows elongate; reaching toward the grand arch; grasping desperately at the last rays of light…

Liz Forest Hills Stone Flower

Liz Forest Hills 'Eroded Lily'

Liz Forest Hills 'Tree upon Tree'

Liz Forest Hills 'Mourn'

Liz Forest Hills 'Tiny Girl and Her Long Shadow'

Liz Forest Hills 'Sanders'

Liz Forest Hills 'Cornelia'

Liz Forest Hills 1

Liz Forest Hills 'Gleam'

Happy Haunting My Friends…

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All photography in this post is copyright Liz Kelleher, used here with permission, courtesy of the artist

View the complete photo set at Liz Kelleher’s Flickr Page by clicking here.

For more information about Liz and her work, please visit her blog  …….  Lizkdc Dislocation

Learn more about Forest Hills Cemetery and upcoming events by visiting ….  The Forest Hills Educational Trust here.

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Article copyright 2009 Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced for any reason without written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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Bringing Nature’s Beauty Indoors: Dried Flowers and Grasses Catch Light and Play with Shadows…

October 30th, 2009 § 1 comment § permalink

dried queen annes lace

Dried flower heads from a field of Queen Anne’s lace sparkle against frosted glass…

The last days of October have arrived and the natural world outside my door is slowly bleaching, bronzing and browning to a warm patina. Gorgeous distractions demand my attention at every corner. Still, there is much work to be done in the garden before winter arrives – so I wander about the flower beds daily, preparing for next season’s long slumber. As I gather up pots, toss spent annuals, and attend to various autumn gardening tasks, warm rays of sunlight illuminate ornamental grass and dried flowers, highlighting their texture and form. The stark and skeletal remains of Queen Anne’s Lace and the honey colored needles of Amsonia hubrichtii seem to call out for individual attention. As I work I often collect some of nature’s gifts for indoor display. Placed in delicate vases without water, these bits of frilly, feathery foliage will last for weeks on table and desk tops, where they sparkle in the late afternoon sun as I write. Larger souvenirs from my garden, (such as Hydrangea paniculata and Miscanthus sinensis), fill Aletha Soule’s vasesRichard Foye’s vessels and various old, terracotta urns placed near brightly lit windows and doors where they catch the long, golden light.

Now is the perfect time to collect ornamental grass and dried flowers by the armful. Gathered garden remnants can be hung upside down from attic beams and garage rafters to be used later for wreaths and table displays throughout the winter months…

Amsonia in Vase

Golden Amsonia hubrichtii sings in blue blown-glass…

Native Hair Grass

Deschampsia flexuosa, (Common hair grass), from the meadow catches light in my kitchen on a late afternoon. Raku vessel by Richard Foye.

Hydrangea paniculata 'Limelight'

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Limelight’ in an Aletha Soule gunmetal glaze pitcher…

Miscanthus sinensis strictus (Porcupine grass)

Miscanthus sinensis ‘Strictus’, (Porcupine grass), in a urn by the studio door…

R Foye Urn in studio

Miscanthus sinensis ‘Purpurascens’, (Flame grass), in a Richard Foye urn beside the patio door…

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Article and photographs copyright 2009, Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without express written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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