A Hauntingly Beautiful All Hallow’s Eve: Darkness Falls Across the Land . . .

October 31st, 2012 § 1

Darkness Falls Across the Land, the Midnight Hour is Close at Hand …

Happy Halloween !

Photography and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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The White Witch’s Early Winter Trick: A Morning of Sparkling Autumn Treats

October 28th, 2011 § 4

The Trick of Winter: Cornus kousa Fruits & Fall Foliage in Early Snow

It seems the White Witch of Winter decided to pay us an early Halloween visit last night. Far more accustomed to her raven-haired sister at this time of year, we were all taken a bit by surprise. And though it’s much too soon for her tricks, an early morning walk through the garden revealed a delightful combination of Autumn’s treasures intermingled with Winter’s sparkling treats …

Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy? Winter’s Icy Coat Covered Autumn Leaves & Rudbeckia Seeds on an Autumn Morning at the Secret Garden Door

The White Witch’s Trick is an Early Morning Treat: Frosty, Scarlet Leaves of Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’

Autumn Taken by Surprise: The Icy Backlit Blossoms of Hydrangea paniculata ‘Limelight’

A Tug of War Between Two Seasons: Beyond the Stained-Glass Leaves of the Secret Garden Lies a Path of Snow-White Pom-Poms

Wind-Driven Snow and Frosty Leaf Shadows Haunt the Studio Wall

The Battle for ‘Bloodgood': For a Fleeting, Frigid Moment, the Warmth of Autumn Meets the Chilly Hand of Winter

Tasty Looking Treats: Pink October Icicles at Sunrise

Leaves Like Frosty, Lemon Granita: Snow-Coated Halesia tetraptera Foliage  is a Fine Treat Indeed 

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions) are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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Pretty as a Pumpkin …

October 25th, 2011 § 7

Things that Grow Bumps in the Night: White, Cream and Shadow Blue, I Love Growing Pumpkins, Squash & Gourds, Warts & All (Front and Center to Back: Baby Boo Pumpkin, Gourds & Jarrahdale Pumpkin)

Could There be a More Charming Chariot than Cinderella’s Pumpkin (Rouge Vif d’Etampes)

Tiny, Ghostly Gourds & Jarrahdale Pumpkin

One of my favorite fall traditions is gathering gourds, squash and pumpkins from the garden and scattering them around my front door. Of course, I can never stop at the stoop. I always arrange groups of gourds atop the dining table, kitchen counter and here and there all about the house. Blue Hubbard Squash, Cinderella or “Rouge Vif D’Etampes” pumpkins, lumpy-bumpy green, orange and ghostly white gourds, as well as phantom-white “Spooktacular’ and “Baby Boo”, and “Mini Jack” pumpkins always delight my tiniest studio visitors. Some other dramatic-looking favorites include ghoulish-grey “Jarrahdale”, warty “Marina di Chioggia”, “Musque de Provence” and froggy-skinned “Bliss”.  For All Hallow’s Eve, who can resist a traditional, bright-orange or freakishly white-skinned, glowing Jack-o-Lantern? 

Favorite Fall Traditions: Pumpkins & Squash, Gathered from the Garden and Scattered Around the Front Door. This year’s cast of lumpy, bumpy pumpkins, scary squash and ghastly gourds were grown from  Renee’s Garden Seeds and Johnny’s Selected Seeds

For Jack-o-Lantern carving, I’m still partial to traditional orange pumpkin varieties, though I do have a soft spot for small, white “Spooktacular” (Photo from last year’s Halloween Special: click here, if you dare!)

The Gardener’s Eden is not an affiliate of Renee’s Garden Seeds or Johnny’s Selected Seeds, but Michaela is a long time, happy customer of both companies.

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photos, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions) are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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Bavarian Purple, Spanish Roja & More: Selecting & Planting Gourmet Garlic …

October 24th, 2011 § 2

Gorgeous, Gourmet Garlic! Bulbs, Clockwise from Top of Ceramic Bowl: German White, Russian Red, Bavarian Purple & Spanish Roja. On Table: Two Heads of Doc’s German & One Each of German Red & Music. In Basket: A Combination of All Garlic Varieties, Plus Continental.

Creatures of the night, beware: I grow garlic! Garlic and onion braids hang from the wooden beams of my kitchen, and they inhabit colorful ceramic keepers on my shelves. I have garlic galore planted in my garden, squirreled away for winter use upon shelves in paper bags and hanging from floor joists in my cellar. Vampires dare not kiss me, for I cook with this delightfully stinky herb most every night.

Every autumn, I plant many varieties of cold hardy, hardneck garlic in my potager (hardneck garlic is the best choice for climates with long, cold winters). It’s a good idea to purchase garlic grown close to your own home (this insures the hardiest selections for your climate and local growing conditions), and traditionally, each October, I visit the annual Garlic & Arts Festival in nearby North Orange, Massachusetts, to select a few more gourmet bulbs for my garden. One of my all-time favorite garlic varieties, which I finally found at the festival a few years ago, is Spanish Roja (a rocambole hardneck garlic). This beautifully colored, hot and spicy selection possesses a true garlic flavor and easy-to-peel cloves, making it one of the most popular —and sometimes hard to find— bulbs at market. This zesty variety and others —including German Red, Bavarian Purple and Russian Red—-  tend  to be my favorite types for roasting and cooking. But I also love the milder varieties of garlic —including smokey, medium heat Continental— for salad dressing, salsa, cold pasta and other recipes calling for raw cloves, and for use in subtler dishes.

Garlic Bulbs are Harvested in Late Summer, When the Tops Yellow, Wither and Flop (Also True for Onions). Once Lifted from the Earth with a Garden Fork, Excess Soil is Shaken from the Bulbs as They ‘Cure’ for Two Weeks in a Warm, Dry Place.

Many hard neck garlic varieties (including rocambole, porcelain and striped) store beautifully in cool, dark, dry conditions. Porcelain garlic bulbs, such as German White and Music, are exceptionally good selections for long-term (up to 9 months under optimal conditions) storage. Russian Red, another good-sized porcelain hardneck variety, is also a top-notch keeper. I hang garlic braids in my kitchen and always have a few bulbs on hand in ceramic keepers, but most of my garlic is stored on shelves in a cool (approximately 55 degrees) part of my dark, dry cellar. After harvest and curing (for more detail, see previous post by clicking here) I like to store my garlic bulbs in braids (click here for my popular onion/garlic braiding tutorial with step-by-step photos) and in loosely folded, brown paper bags (this provides ample air circulation). I mark the name of the variety on the outside for quick reference. Some bulbs return to the garden every autumn, and the rest remain in stock on my shelves for winter and springtime use.

Preparing to Plant Garlic: Breaking a Basket of Large, Firm, Hard Neck Bulbs into Cloves

Mid-autumn is the best time to plant hardneck garlic in my climate. Each year I rotate my crop; preparing a new garlic bed with fresh compost in late September. Selecting large, firm bulbs from my crop, I carefully separate the cloves and prepare tags for each variety. On a cool, dry October day, I plant each clove approximately 2″ deep and 4-6″ apart (space wider for big, porcelain bulbs like Music). Mulching is very important in cold climates like Vermont. I use throughly rotted compost and clean straw or ground oak leaves for a nice thick mulch. Read more about garlic planting, and find a link back to removing and using garlic scapes, in my previous post “A Thousand Mothers Set Into Earth” by clicking here.

Of Course the Best Part of Growing Garlic is Eating It! Click Here for a Delicious Garlic and Potato Soup Recipe

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photos, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions) are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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Things Getting A Little Creepy ? Wishing You a Happy Halloween !

October 31st, 2010 § 3

Jumping Spider (Araneae salticidae) Photograph ⓒ Tim Geiss at poltergeiss.com

We only look scary! These arachnids are a gardener’s friends. Although some spiders are venomous, most are environmentally beneficial creatures worthy of our respect and protection. Read more about the predatory jumping spider (Araneae Salticidae) —a common ‘guest’ in houses—  and the soil-dwelling red velvet mite ( Acari Trombidiidae) by clicking on the name of each spider. For help identifying North American spiders, check out the very interesting spideridentification.org or the arachnid page on whatsthatbug.com.

Predatory Red Velvet Mite (Arachnida Acari Trombidiidae sp) Photograph ⓒ Tim Geiss at poltergeiss.com

Jumping Spider (Araneae salticidae) Photograph ⓒ Tim Geiss at poltergeiss.com

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Spider Photographs ⓒ Tim Geiss at Poltergeiss.com

Article ⓒ Michaela at TGE

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All Seems Tranquil in This Garden …. But Beware: Things Change When Darkness Falls

October 30th, 2010 § 6

A Pretty Little Pumpkin Sits in a Seasonal Display…
And a Sweet Garden Gnome Rests, Nestled Amongst Over-Wintering Plants and Garden Treasures. It All Seems so Peaceful.
But even Gnomes have secret desires, jealousies and ambitions. And sometimes, when you least expect it…

It’s Night of the Living Gnome…

He Has Another Side…
He’s Been Harboring Dark Thoughts…
And Secret Desires…
Gasp!
“Oh no… !”
“Whaaaat’s goooin’ on here…. Mr. Gnome?”
“Nice Mr. Gnome… Please stay right there!”
Thud
“Take that you little squash…”
AHHHHHHHH !!!!
“Oh, Noooooooooooo !”
Thwap!
“Oh, I can feel myself fading… Fading…”
The Gnome, Settled in to His New Seat-with-a-View…
Waits With Wildflowers (Common evening primrose, Oenothera biennis*) for His Mistress, the Gardener.
*At one time, evening primrose was used to speed the healing of bruises and wounds. Interesting choice, Wolfie.
***

Article and photographs ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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Must Be The Season Of The Witch…

October 30th, 2010 § 2

“When I look out my Window, Many sights to see. And when I look out my window, So many different people to be… That it’s strange, so strange.”

“You’ve got to pick up every stitch, You’ve got to pick up every stitch, You’ve got to pick up every stitch… Mm, must be the Season of the Witch, Must be the Season of the Witch, yea…”

“Must be the Season of the Witch…”

Witch Hazel (Hamamelis vernalis) – Turns Brilliant Gold in Late Autumn

Dwarf Witch Alder (Fothergilla gardenii) – Radiates an Eerie Orange Glow in the Secret Garden

I caught her last night in the garden; blowing around in the wind and casting her spells in the drizzly shadows. She’s a changeling and she’s a wild thing. You never know how she will appear from one minute to the next. Red? Orange? Yellow? Perhaps all three hues will turn up in her autumn brew. Yes, she’s the garden witch, and this is indeed her season…

Witch Alder (Fothergilla major ‘Mt Airy’) is My Answer to Burning Bush in the Garden

Hamamelis (witch hazel) and Fothergilla (witch alder) are two of the most spellbinding woody plants in my garden. The magical blossoms of Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’ light up the gloomy days of March with color and scent, and later her cousins, the Fothergilla, take over with bewitching blossoms in April and May (read more about Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’ by clicking here, and Fothergilla by clicking here). But it’s the witching hour — late October and November in my garden— when these sorceresses truly light up the gathering gloom…

The Wild, Red Witch (Fothergilla ‘Mt Airy’) raging along the walkway in late October

The family of Hamamelidaceae is a large group that includes both spring and autumn blooming Witch Hazels (native Hamamelis vernalis and Hamamelis mollis) and their cousins, the Witch Alders (among other woody plants). Although the spring-blooming Witch Hazels tend to me more dramatic in the early part of the year, the autumn blooming species provides both stunning foliage and fragrant flowers in fall (it is definitely harder to spot the sweetly-scented yellow blossoms on my autumn blooming Hamamelis mollis behind the golden foliage). Some of the most gorgeous autumn color in the garden belongs to the Witch Hazel hybrids; particularly H x intermedia ‘Diane’, ‘Jelena’ and ‘Arnold’s Promise’. Although a separate species, Fothergilla is equally magical, and often more flamboyant in her end-of-season color display. A dwarf Witch Alder (Fothergilla gardenii) is planted in the corner of my Secret Garden, where she is just now turning brilliant orangey-yellow. Elsewhere in the garden, Fothergilla major ‘Mt Airy’ glow red, orange, yellow and every imaginable shade in between…

Witch Hazel ‘Diane’ (Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’) – Autumn Color Variation

Witch Hazel ‘Diane’ (Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’) – Autumn Color Variation

Witch Alder (Fothergilla major ‘Mt Airy’) Leaf Color Variation

Most members of the Hamamelidaceae family prefer moist, semi-acidic soil and mostly sunny to partially shady conditions (in nature, they are forest edge and understory trees and shrubs). Some Witch Hazels and Witch Alders are quite hardy in northern climates; all of those mentioned here are reliable in USDA zones 4-9. In the garden, they are enchanting in autumn when paired with late-season flowers (including anemone and aster) fall-blooming crocus, ornamental grasses, and conifers (including shade-tolerant Microbiota). Catching a rooted witch is far easier than snagging the airborne variety: no net is necessary, simply stop in your local garden center and poke around the sales aisles…

Can You Catch the Witch?

This Story’s Inspiration Comes from One of My Favorite Songs by Donovan

Donovan – Season of the Witch

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“Season of the Witch” Lyrics are ⓒ Donovan 1967

Black Patent Leather Boots are by Stuart Weitzman at Endless


Article and photographs ⓒ Michaela at TGE

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through our affiliate links. Advertisers do not pay for editorial placement here, but do remit a small percentage of any sale originating from The Gardener’s Eden affiliate links to this site. All proceeds will go toward web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you for your support!

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“He Who Walks Behind the Rows”… Lost in a Labyrinth of Stalks & Tassels: Exploring the Art of the Corn Maze

October 23rd, 2010 § 2

“He Who Walks Behind the Rows”…

Clouds gather, dark and low on the horizon. The daylight is fading. You’ve been driving through miles of cornfields and back country roads. Suddenly, something  —a child?— darts across the cracked pavement and into the corn rows. Immediately, you pull over and step from the warmth of your car. A rush of cold air scrapes across your face; the rustle of cornstalks rising and dragging behind you in the wind.

Tentatively you call out, but there’s no answer. Were your eyes playing tricks on you after hours of travel? Why hadn’t you stopped for a break? Wait… What is that sound? You step from the grassy roadway margin, into the long, shadowy corn rows. There —there it is again— off in the distance. Is it a cry, or is it laughter? The voice of a child or an animal’s wail? Once more it rises from the stalks —pitching higher now— calling up from beyond the swaying tassels. And then… Silence. Your hair rises at the back of your neck. You pause, and —in a moment of instinct— rush breathlessly down the narrow pathway —heart pounding into your throat— racing against the twilight…

A quarter mile in, you hear a crack and you call out into the empty field – but there’s no answer. Turning toward the sound, you dash through the stalks to the left, then to the right. Racing down a wider path —breathless— you suddenly stop; eyes stinging from the rising dust. This must be a main corridor, but there’s no end in sight. There, blowing across the ground on the pathway ahead, you spot a piece of paper. As you unfold it —examining the wobbly dotted line— you wonder: is this a child’s drawing, an attempt at simplistic map? You clutch the torn paper —palms clammy-cold— and press forward. The map seems accurate, but then, there’s no indication of what lies ahead: a divide in the road…

One side seems smoother and a bit wider. Slowing down, you begin to stop and start; futile attempts to get your bearings. The sky is growing darker, and the path narrows again. All around you —above and to the sides, before you and behind— there is nothing but hollow stalks of corn. Then, straight ahead: an improbable staircase. Quickly, you scramble to the top…

As you near the highest point of the platform, your heart sinks. Taking in the monochromatic vista, you suddenly realize that your car, the road and the surrounding landscape have completely vanished. As far as the eye can see, there is nothing but an endless expanse of bleached stalks —knocking  to and fro — rattling like bones in the wind. Is there no way out? Will you ever be found? Wait. There it is again. A low and plaintive cry. Something is moving out there. Something is calling for you. Is it… Malachai ?

Inspiration: The 1984 film, Children of the Corn, based on Stephen King’s short story by the same name

All photographs in this story were shot especially for The Gardener’s Eden by Tim Geiss at Poltergeiss.com. Images were made on location at Sauchuk Farm Maze in Plympton, Massachusetts. For maze and farm hours and directions, visit the farm website by clicking here.

The  Story  Behind  The  Story:  Those  Amazing  Corn  Mazes  &  The  Farms  They  Help  Support

Gaines Farm, Haunted Corn Maze in Guilford, Vermont (Aerial Photography ⓒ Michaela at TGE)

Mazes (sometimes called corn maizes or, historically, labyrinths) are believed to have originated in Europe, where they have been a popular form of amusement for centuries. Although mazes and labyrinths may be constructed using various materials —from grass and clipped hedges to earth and stone— most modern mazes are created with corn. In mid to late May, corn —usually special varieties selected for stalk strength and height— is planted in rows and later (usually in June) cut or tilled into patterns; creating elaborate designs and pathways in fields. Many years ago, patterns for labyrinths were drawn out on paper and cut by hand with sythes. Today, most mazes are cut with tillers or other machinery when the corn is knee-high (some farms use herbicides). Some modern maze designers use computer graphs and GPS coordinates to create elaborate grid patterns. However, many mazes, such as the walking puzzles pictured here —created by the MAiZE company based in Utah— continue to be designed and cut by hand.

It all begins with corn kernels in May…

My closest maze is located at the Gaines Farm —the bicentennial dairy farm pictured in the aerial photograph above— in nearby Guilford, Vermont. The Gaines Farm corn maze combines a MAiZE Co. designed labyrinth with haunted hayrides and other Halloween attractions every fall. Corn mazes are fun for kids and families of all ages, and visiting one is a great way to help support your local farm. Autumn corn mazes have become an important and growing source of revenue for small farms and agricultural communities throughout the United States and Canada. Maize labyrinths also continue to be popular in Europe —particularly England— and are a growing trend in other parts of the world as well. To find and experience a corn maze near you, try searching the MAiZE Co. database online, or this puzzle listing on About.com. If your local maze is not listed on the About.com site, be sure to submit it so that others may enjoy the experience!

John Deere Tractor at Sauchuk Farm

Sauchuk Farm’s “Walk Around the World” Corn Maze in Plympton, Massachusetts Photo: Sauchuk Farm Website

Please help support your local farming community by attending harvest-season events!

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Photography in this story (exceptions as noted) ⓒ Tim Geiss at Poltergeiss.com

Article and other photographs (as noted) ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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Haunting Forest Hills Cemetery with Photographer Liz Kelleher…

October 30th, 2009 § 5

Liz Forest Hills 'Meet Me at the Cemetery Gates'

“The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague.      Who shall say where one ends, and where the other begins?”                                              – Edgar Allan Poe,  Premature Burial,  1844

Liz Forest Hills 'Double Cross'

In celebration of All Hallows’ Eve, The Gardener’s Eden proudly presents a ghostly photographic tour of the Forest Hills Cemetery through the eyes of artist Liz Kelleher. No Halloween ever feels complete without a twilight stroll through a shadowy, mysterious graveyard. And what better haunt than a lonely old cemetery in the heart of New England?

Welcome to Forest Hills Cemetery, located in a quiet corner of Boston, Massachusetts. This historic, Victorian-style landmark was designed in 1848. Planned and operated as a living-memorial, Forest Hills Cemetery is an active burial ground within a magnificent 275 acre landscape. Today this beautiful and haunting place serves many purposes. The cemetery includes an impressive arboretum, winding paths, modern and historic sculpture and a quiet body of water known as Lake Hibiscus. As an outdoor museum, the cemetery gives us a glimpse into another world – a time long gone. Perhaps overshadowed by the far more famous Mt. Auburn Cemetery in nearby Cambridge, this somewhat forgotten and always eerie ‘garden of memories’ is also the eternal home and final resting place of many historic Boston figures. These souls include activists, (such as William Lloyd Garrison and Lucy Stone), poets, playwrights, (including Anne Sexton, ee cummings, Eugene O’Neil and Martin Milmore), and other famous, late-citizens of New England…

Liz Forest Hills 'Red Death'

Liz K. Late Bloom Among the Late Citizens

So now… Take Liz’s hand as she drifts through the empty garden. Brush close against the cold tombs, like the ivy and hydrangea, which caress the solemn angels as they silently guard the spirits within the iron gate. What souls watch as we make our way past the towering celtic crosses, tiny headstones and lost lambs? Can you hear the long ago voices in the whispering wind and the callous croaking of the crow? Watch as ancient trees bow down; hovering above the chilly, stone-mourners as their shadows elongate; reaching toward the grand arch; grasping desperately at the last rays of light…

Liz Forest Hills Stone Flower

Liz Forest Hills 'Eroded Lily'

Liz Forest Hills 'Tree upon Tree'

Liz Forest Hills 'Mourn'

Liz Forest Hills 'Tiny Girl and Her Long Shadow'

Liz Forest Hills 'Sanders'

Liz Forest Hills 'Cornelia'

Liz Forest Hills 1

Liz Forest Hills 'Gleam'

Happy Haunting My Friends…

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All photography in this post is copyright Liz Kelleher, used here with permission, courtesy of the artist

View the complete photo set at Liz Kelleher’s Flickr Page by clicking here.

For more information about Liz and her work, please visit her blog  …….  Lizkdc Dislocation

Learn more about Forest Hills Cemetery and upcoming events by visiting ….  The Forest Hills Educational Trust here.

***

Article copyright 2009 Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced for any reason without written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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