Blushing Autumn Blossoms …

October 23rd, 2011 § Comments Off on Blushing Autumn Blossoms … § permalink

Blossoms to Spare & Share: One of the Gardener’s Greatest Rewards (Sprigs of Eucalyptus cinerea & Hydrangea paniculata ‘Limelight’ with Autumn Blush)

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions) are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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A Moody, Pale Lavender Haze … Heather-Covered Ledges Soothe the Eye In the Softest Shade of Summer …

July 18th, 2011 § Comments Off on A Moody, Pale Lavender Haze … Heather-Covered Ledges Soothe the Eye In the Softest Shade of Summer … § permalink

The Soft Beauty of Lavender-Colored Heather: Calluna vulgaris ‘Silver Knight’ 

Calluna vulgaris ‘Silver Knight’, Juniperus horizontalis ‘Wiltonii’ and Juniperus x pfizerianna ‘Sea Green’ Along the Ledgy Walkway

A Hazy Slope of Heather (Calluna vulgaris ‘Silver Knight’) in the Palest Shade of Lavender 

While much of my garden blooms in brilliant, sunny shades of gold, yellow and orange throughout the summer, there are many quiet, soothing spaces here as well. Along the exposed ledges —where water drains freely and sun heats thin pockets of soil— a wide swath of Heath (Erica carnea) and Heather (Calluna vulgaris) sprawls along the stoney slope. Throughout the wet and chilly month of April, Spring Heath (Erica carnea) blossoms here in a tender shade of pink (plant profile post/photos here and more photos here). Later, in mid-summer, Heather (Calluna vulgaris) —Heath’s natural companion— colors the outcrop in a hazy shade of lavender. 

Heath and Heather make wonderful, low, ground-covering plants —6″ -24″ high—  for dry, sunny slopes and rock gardens. I grow several cultivars of Erica and Calluna here in my zone 4/5 garden; using them in combination with blue-green junipers, sedum and other plants to paint a colorful carpet along the ledges. Native to Europe and Asia, Calluna vulgaris prefers acidic, sandy soil with excellent drainage and, unlike many garden plants, this tough little shrub actually prefers low soil fertility. Although cold-hardy to zone 4, Heather dislikes heavy soil and wet, humid conditions; making this plant a poor choice for gardeners with shady, wet sites and for those south of zone 6/7. The long-lasting, slender flowers are beautiful planted en masse in the garden or gathered up in fresh or dried arrangements. With so many cultivars to choose from, I am tempted to keep adding to my ledgy tapestry. Calluna vulgaris ‘Silver Knight’ is one of the finest, and my favorite of the pale-lavender heathers. Blooming long and late in the season —just coming into flower here now, in mid July— ‘Silver Knight’ continues to add beauty to the garden, even in early winter (click here to view photos of various heath and heather wearing a coat of ice.)

Heather-Covered Ledges: Calluna vulgaris ‘Silver Knight’

Photographs and Text (with noted exception) ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, articles and content on this site, (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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Everlasting Beauty: Displaying Dreamy, Delicate, Dried Narcissus…

March 5th, 2011 § 3 comments § permalink

As Pretty Dried & Arranged in a Bowl on the Vanity as Fresh in the Flower Pot: Various Dried Narcissus

I’m the girl in back of the dining room; lingering with the last crumbs of her chocolate cake and bubbling prosecco. I like to draw my pleasure out; never leaving too soon. Of course, I feel the same way about about flowers. As the blossoms of my forced narcissus fade and wither, I snip them off and collect them in bags. Once dried, I like to arrange them in bowls and vases; scattering them here and there along tables, shelves and vanities in order to stretch out my enjoyment. Throw out my flowers? Oh, I hardly ever! Narcissus, lily of the valley, roses: many blossoms are as beautiful in dried arrangements as fresh…

Narcissus ‘Grand Soleil d’Or’ – Pretty Fresh or Dried

Lovely in a Vase Atop the Dresser

I’m Particularly Partial to the Look of Flowers in Bowls, and I Display Them on My Desk, Dinner Table, Dresser, Vanity & Book Shelves. Fresh & Floating or Delicate & Dried, I Think Flowers are Gorgeous Most Any Way. Never Let Go of Something Beautiful, Too Soon… Dried Narcissus are Pretty Pinned in Hair and on Packages too!

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Article and Photos are ⓒ Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All photographs, articles and content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced or reposted without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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A Time for Gathering Friends & Family, Harvest Dinners & Giving Thanks…

November 25th, 2010 § 2 comments § permalink

Happy Thanksgiving !

In this season of giving thanks, I would like to express my gratitude to all of you for following The Gardener’s Eden. Thank you for  your many delightful comments and email correspondence, and thank you for sharing this site with your friends. I truly love hearing from you, both here on the site, and also on The Gardener’s Eden’s Facebook and Twitter pages. I am so grateful for the many wonderful, new friendships growing from this lovely garden online. It takes time and care to build friendships, just as it takes time and care to build gardens. Thank you for joining me here.

Thank you to Tim Geiss, friend, photographer and IT wiz-beyond-compare. Without you, Tim, this blog would not exist, and I am ever-grateful for your your technical expertise, assistance, and all of your generous help. And thank you for sharing your amazing photographs —many taken specifically for this site— throughout the year. I also want to thank John Miller at The Old School House Plantery, for your wonderful contributions as guest blogger, and Ted Dillard, for your fantastic photography tips and your recent article on Electric Gardening!

I’ve made some wonderful connections through The Gardener’s Eden over the past year and a half, and I am deeply grateful for those new friendships. Thank you to Guillermo at The Honeybee Conservancy, for your enthusiasm and encouragement over the past year -it has been a pleasure working with you. And thank you to Kristin Zimmerman. Kristin, I had so much fun working with you at Barnes & Noble’s Garden Variety , and although I hope you are enjoying your new job, I want you to know that I am already missing you, your careful editing and our weekly email exchanges. And a great, big, heart-felt thank you to Stacey Hirvela and Miranda Van Gelder at Martha Stewart Living’s At Home in the Garden and Martha Stewart Living Magazine for extending a hand across this virtual, online gardening community. Thank you for opening the door to such unexpected and exciting opportunities.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Have a Lovely Holiday Weekend Everyone!

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Article & Photographs ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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The Subtle Hues of November’s Garden Play Softly in Low Light & Gentle Mist…

November 23rd, 2010 § 5 comments § permalink

The Remaining Fruit on this Tea Viburnum Gleams Like Candy Store Gumdrops (Viburnum setigerum) Against a Background of Honey-Colored Miscanthus

Surprised by a late November warm spell —gardens enveloped by quiet rain and soft fog— I found myself shrugging a few responsibilities and wandering around in the late afternoon light. Everywhere, tiny droplets of rain —caught between cobwebs and berry-laden branches—sparkled like a million loose diamonds. The last colors of autumn are slowly fading now —shifting toward subtler, wintery hues— and on misty days like today, the conifers —particularly blue-green junipers— look fresh and lovely beside damped stone walls, candy-colored fruits and bleached meadow grasses.

On busy days filled with life’s chaos —places to go and things to do— the gentle calm of nature whispers and soothes a busy mind. The garden is my sanctuary. So, before the holiday whirlwind sweeps you up and carries you away, take a walk with me… Breathe in the scent of the damp earth and listen to the sound of falling rain…

Holger’s Singleseed Juniper (Juniperus squamata ‘Holger’) Atop the Secret Garden Stairs

Viburnum setigerum: Berries with Rain Drops

Sprinkled in Sparkling Raindrops at the Edge of the Meadow: Deschampsia flexuosa (Tufted Hair Grass), Cotoneaster and Juniperus squamata ‘Holger’

Juniperus squamata ‘Holger’ (Holger’s Singleseed Juniper) Atop the Secret Garden Steps on a Foggy November Morning at Ferncliff

Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’ in the Late November Entry Garden at Ferncliff

Climbing Hydrangea Consumes a Lichen-Splotched Boulder at the Edge of the Garden (Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris)

Flower-Remnants in Fog – Climbing Hydrangea (H. anomala subsp. petiolaris)

At Meadow’s Edge, Bleaching Flame Grass Continues to Add Texture and Warmth to the Landscape (Miscanthus purpurascens)

Rhus typhina, our Native Staghorn Sumac (read more about this beauty by clicking back, here)

The Texture and Color of Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’) Adds Subtle Beauty to the Late Autumn and Winter Landscape

Thousands of Raindrops Add Dazzling Sparkle to the Colorful November Foliage of Daphne x burkwoodii ‘Carol Mackie’

Juniperus horizontalis Spills Over the Entryway Retaining Wall

Raindrops Collect on Cobwebs Lining the Cotoneaster (C. dammeri ‘Eichholz’) Spilling Over the Stone Retaining Wall

The Vertical, White Lines of Paper Birch Stand Stark Along the Toffee-Toned Hillside

The Rich, Caramel-Gold Color of  Miscanthus sinensis ‘Strictus’ is a Welcoming Sight on a Foggy Day

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Article and photographs ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through our affiliate links. A small percentage of any sale originating from The Gardener’s Eden will go toward web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you for your support!

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