In the Hazy Light of August . . .

August 30th, 2013 § Comments Off on In the Hazy Light of August . . . § permalink

Hazy Late August Light - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comThe Home Stretch of Summer

Crickets, bluejays, morning fog, lazy sunrises & lengthening shadows; September is coming . . .

Looking Forward, Looking Back - Swans on the Cove - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comSeems We’re all Soaking Up the Last, Warm, Hazy Days of August . . .

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Lost in a Late Summer Reverie . . .

August 22nd, 2013 § Comments Off on Lost in a Late Summer Reverie . . . § permalink

Dahlia 'Karma Choc' with Angelonia 'Angelface Dark Violet' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com On the Terrace: Dahlia ‘Karma Choc’ and Angelonia angustifolia ‘Angelface Dark Violet’

Out watering containers this morning —listening to the chorus of crickets in the meadow and cedar waxwings in the viburnum— I found myself lost in a late summer reverie. With Dahlias, Summersweet, fragrant Lilies, Garden Phlox and Hydrangea in bloom, ornamental grasses sending up tinted blades and silken tassels, and many other favorites just coming into bud or forming ripe, colorful fruit, August is glorious month in my garden. Sometimes it can be hard to leave here!

August's Full, Green Corn Moon - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com August’s Green Corn Moon, Through Swaying Blades of Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’)

For many gardeners, late summer is a time of winding down, cutting back, and dreaming of next spring. But why turn away from garden pleasures so soon? The second act is just getting started! The Turtle Head (Chelone lyonii), Yellow Waxbells (Kirengeshoma palmata), Fairy Candles (Actaea simplex), Monkshood (Aconitum), Windflower (Anemone hybrids), Bushclover (Lespedeza thunbergii) and Asters are just loaded with buds and the Beautyberry (Callicarpa), Dogwood (Cornus species), Cotoneaster, Juniper, Viburnum and Winterberry (Ilex verticillata) are laden with ripening fruit and colorful, shiny berries.  The big summer party’s just warming up… Won’t you stick around and keep me company? Here are a few of my late-season favorites —currently blooming or covered with berries— to whet your whistle . . .

Clethra alnifolia 'Ruby Spice' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com In the Wildflower Meadow Border: Ruby Spice Summersweet (Clethra alnifolia ‘Ruby Spice’)

Henry Eilers Sweet Coneflower (Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers') - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Henry Eilers Sweet Coneflower and Flickering Tips of Flame Grass at Meadow’s Edge (Rudbeckia subtomentosa’Henry Eilers’ & Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens)

Phlox paniculata - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comGarden Phlox (Phlox paniculata), is a great plant for late season fragrance, color and attracting pollinators like butterflies, hummingbirds and bees. Control powdery mildew by choosing mildew-resistant cultivars (‘Jeana’, shown above in bud, ‘David’, increasing soil moisture (add compost and a thick layer of mulch), alkalinity (adding lime to the soil in early spring or autumn), air circulation (divide clumps in late summer or early autumn and thin in early spring), and treating foliage with horticultural oil or homemade anti-fungal remedy (click here)

Obedient Plant (Physostegia virginiana) - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com A Lovely, Late-Season Selection, the Obedient Plant (Physostegia virginians), Can Actually Get a Bit Aggressive in a Perennial Border. Although it is a Beautiful, North American Native Flower —Popular with Pollinators as Well— I Recommend Thoughtful, Wild-Garden Positioning. Pretty in the Landscape and Vase, Obedience is Not One of Her Virtues!

Hummingbird Summersweet - Clethra alnifolia 'Hummingbird' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Smaller in Stature, Hummingbird Summersweet (Clethra alnifolia ‘Hummingbird’), Sits Pretty Beside the Studio Door, Filling the August Air with Fragrance

Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum 'Shasta' Fruits in Sunshower - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Nearby, the Doublefile Viburnum —Laden with Glistening Red Fruit— Draws Cedar Waxwings and Other Songbirds by the Flock (V. plicatum var. tomentosum ‘Shasta’)

Physocarpus opulifolius 'Diablo', Miscanthus and Solidago - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comThe Honey-Hued Beauty of Goldenrod Lights up Ninebark’s Maroon Foliage an Old Vase: Solidago, Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’ and Miscanthus sinensis ‘Strictus’. Goldenrod is Often Erroneously Blamed for Allergies. Ragweed (Similar Bloom Time and Color) is the Wind-Pollinated Culprit.

Cornus kousa Fruits Ripening - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Ripening Cornus kousa Fruits are Every Bit as Pretty as the Blossoms, and Don’t Even Get Me Started on the Fall Foliage Color!

Cutleaf Coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Cutleaf Coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata), is a Tall, Back-of-the-Border Plant. A North American Native, it is a Favorite of Monarch and Swallowtail Butterflies, Bees and Many Other Pollinators. It Also Makes a Beautiful & Stately Cut Flower.

Oakleaf Hydrangea Blossoms Shifting Color (Hydrangea quercifolia) with Juniper - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com I’ve Never Been One for Blue Hydrangea —Color Never Looks True to My Eye— But I’m Mad for the Rest. The Late-Summer Blush and Autumn Foliage of the Oakleaf Species Make it One of My All-Time Favorites (Hydrangea quercifolia)

Common Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) in the Moonlight - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Common Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare), Yarrow-Leaf Tansy (Tanacetum achilleifolium) & Yarrow (Achille millefolium) Offer Late-Season Blooms and Make Great Additions to Bouquets and Dried Arrangements

Variegated Maidengrass (Miscanthus sinensis 'Variegatus') in Moonlight - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Variegated Maiden Grass in the Moonlight

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

Do you enjoy The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through affiliate links. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to this site, helping to cover web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you so much for your support!

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Anticipating the Blue, Green Corn Moon

August 20th, 2013 § Comments Off on Anticipating the Blue, Green Corn Moon § permalink

full moonrise - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comMagical Moonlight on My Hilltop

When skies are clear and the timing is right, August’s full, Green Corn Moon is often spectacular. Tonight it will be extra special, as this full moon, also known as the Sturgeon Moon and Grain Moon, is a Blue Moon as well. Yes, yes, I know there’s only one full moon this August, but it’s true. Due to a little known astronomical rule, this is in fact a blue moon! Curious? Read more about the scientific and historic details of this unusual celestial event by visiting this link at Space.com.

Blue moons aren’t blue, of course; at least not usually. But no matter the actual color of this full moon, with clear skies and a early rise to meet sunset’s afterglow, it’s certain to be a good show here on the east coast. Be sure to catch moonrise tonight at 7:10pm ET.

Enjoy!

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

Do you enjoy The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through affiliate links. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to this site, helping to cover web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you so much for your support!

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As the Days of Late Summer Fly By . . .

August 17th, 2013 § 4 comments § permalink

Aerial View Above the Connecticut River Valley -  Farmland - Pioneer Valley - Massachusetts - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comAbove the Ripe Fields – Pioneer Valley, Massachusetts

Spending a bit more time in the air again, of late… Enjoying the beauty of the New England landscape, from above. Some time away, a fresh perspective… All good. And so, I’ve collected and edited a visual journal of these hours and days. Colors, textures and patterns; strange, yet familiar beauty to share from the untethered world above.

Come fly away with me. A few moments, inside the sky . . .

Deerfield, Massachusetts, Pioneer Valley Farmland - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Land Patterns - Above the Pioneer Valley - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comStripes, Dots, Color-Blocks and Shadow Shapes: Land Patterns

Barn and Plowed Fields - Pioneer Valley - Massachusetts - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Tobacco Barn Beauty in Shimmering Late Day Sunlight

Swamp Aerial - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Swampland Beauty with Afternoon’s Advancing Shadows

Tiny Island, Quabbin Reservoir, Massachusetts - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Tiny, Uninhabited Islands, Quabbin Reservoir, Massachusetts

Tiny Island ll, Quabbin Reservoir, Massachusetts - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Above Quabbin Reservoir, Massachusetts - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comThe Landscape, Reflected: High Above Quabbin Reservoir, Massachusetts

Quabbin Reservoir Uninhabited Island, Quabbin Reservoir, Massachusetts

Rhode Island Coastline - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Rhode Island Coastline

Mohegan Bluffs, Block Island, Rhode Island - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comAbove Mohegan Bluffs, Block Island, Rhode Island

Beach Fire - Block Island - Rhode Island - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comBeach Fire Circle, Block Island, Rhode Island

Mohegan Bluffs - Block Island - Rhode Island - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comMohegan Bluffs, Block Island, Rhode Island

Boats - Above New Harbor, Block Island, Rhode Island - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com  Boats at New Harbor, Block Island, Rhode Island

Southeast Light, Block Island, Long Island - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Southeast Light, Block Island, Rhode Island

Old Harbor, Block Island, Rhode Island - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Old Harbor, Block Island, Rhode Island

New Harbor, Block Island, Rhode Island - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com New Harbor, Block Island, Rhode Island

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

Do you enjoy The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through affiliate links. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to this site, helping to cover web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you so much for your support!

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Beauty Everlasting: Drying Flowers . . .

August 10th, 2013 § Comments Off on Beauty Everlasting: Drying Flowers . . . § permalink

Heather (Calluna vulgaris 'Silver Knight') michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comArms Full of Heather, Gathered from the Ledges (Calluna vulgaris ‘Silver Knight’), for Drying in Bundles

In a cool climate like New England, with a short growing season and so much to do, summers often feel as if they are passing by too quickly. It seems like we’re all scrambling to stretch out the warm months and the joys of outdoor living for as long as possible. We want to hold on to the sweetness of these long, luxurious summer days. Like many gardeners, my August weekends are filled with harvesting, cooking, baking, freezing, canning, dehydrating and otherwise preserving the fruits of my spring and summertime labors. There’s a feeling of overwhelming abundance. Over the past few days, I’ve been busy braiding and tying garlic and onions, sun drying mushrooms and tomatoes, cutting and bundling herbs, and gathering armloads of flowers for drying.

Preserving flowers is one of the nicest ways to carry a bit of summertime into the cold, dark months of winter. And it’s such an easy process, that the only thing holding many gardeners back is simply the reminder, and time to do it. Right now, while deadheading and tidying up borders is on my mind, garden shears are often close at hand. Instead of tossing those seed pods and withering remnants into the compost heap, why not gather them up and bring them indoors to preserve for autumn and winter arrangements. And while you’re at it, remember to pick an extra bouquet or two of fresh flowers and herbs to hang from the rafters.

Tanacetum achilleifolium and Penstemon digitalis - michaela medina - thegardenerseden.com Tanacetum achilleifolium and Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’

Pearly Everlasting (Anaphalis margaritacea) - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Pearly Everlasting (Anaphalis margaritacea)

Hang Drying Flowers - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Tried and True Method: Tying and Air-Drying Works Well for Many Flowers. Be Sure to Find a Dry, Warm, Dimly Lit Space with Good Air Circulation. Attics, Closets, Dimly-Lit Spare Rooms and Pantries are All Very Good Spots for Drying Flowers and Herbs.

The simplest method for preserving flowers and herbs is to air-dry them. Harvest once a week or so throughout the growing season —always on dry, sunny days— and hang them upside down in bundles, as shown above. Gather more than you think you need, as most flowers shrink down to about half their original volume as they dehydrate. Remove excess foliage from stems (except in the case of aromatics, such as Lavender and Artemisia), and create small bundles of flowers, allowing for good air flow between the blossoms. Tie the stems with a bit of garden twine and hang them upside down, in a dimly lit, warm, dry space with good air circulation. Good spots for drying flowers and herbs include attics, pantries, spare bedrooms and closets. Dry basements will work too, but keep in mind that moisture and mold are the enemy of dried flowers and herbs. You may wish to cover the tops of delicate flowers, or aromatic cuttings with tied, brown paper bags to prevent damage and keep them free of dust. Bundles may be stored in this manner until they are ready to be used in arrangements (allow at least two to three weeks for flowers to completely dry).

Baptisia australis seed pods for dried arrangements - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Dried & Blackened Seedpods of Baptisia australis are Lovely Solo in a Vase or Make Wonderful Additions to Dried Arrangements

Some good herbs and flowers to try air-drying include; Straw Flower (Helichrysum bracteatum), Statice (Limonium sinuatum), Globe Amaranth (Gomphorena globosa), Love-in-a-Mist (Nigella damascena), Pearly Everlasting (Anaphalis margaritacea), Cockscombs (Celosia cristata), Baby’s Breath (Gypsophila), Goldenrod (Solidago), Globe Thistle (Echinops), Sea Holly (Eryngium), Heather (Calluna), Heath (Erica), Queen Anne’s Lace (Dacus carota), Yarrow (Achillea), Lavender (Lavendula), Tansy (Tanacetum), and Worm Wood (Artemisia). When experimenting with dried flowers, look for plants with rugged stems, stiff or papery petals and/or tiny, tightly-bunched flower heads. Many annual, perennial and woody garden plants —both edible and inedible— make excellent dried specimens. Look out for plants with interesting seed pods or berries, which add beautiful texture to a vase. Plants like Wild Blue Indigo (Baptisia australis), with gorgeous black seed pods, and Carolina Lupine (Thermopsis villosa), with its fuzzy remnants, are striking examples. And don’t forget to scour the forest, fields and shoreline for pinecones, wild grasses, driftwood, vines, seedpods, berries and other botanical remnants in the early days of autumn. All of these, and many more natural elements, make great additions to seasonal arrangements.

Thermopsis villosa - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Carolina Lupine (Thermopsis villosa/ T. caroliniana) Produces Fuzzy Pods After Her Gorgeous, Yellow Blossoms Fade

Although many blossoms can be tied and dried hanging upside down, some flowers —such as Hydrangea, Larkspur (Delphinium) and Allium— preserve best when left standing up. I like to place these blooms in vases with just a small amount of water; allowing the flowers to dry as they absorb the moisture in the vessel. If you wish to preserve shape of flat-topped blossoms —Queen Anne’s Lace and Yarrow, for example— support the heavy flower heads by slipping the stems through wire screen and allow them to dry standing up.

Hydrangea paniculata 'Bobo' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Hydrangea paniculata ‘Bobo’ is a New Addition to My Garden. I Can’t Wait to See How the Flowers Dry.

Drying agents —including borax, cornmeal, sand, alum and silica gel— can be used to aid in dehydrating and preserving more delicate, difficult flowers. Peonies, Dahlias, Tulips and Roses turn out particularly well when dried in sand or silica gel. Some gardeners like to use microwave ovens to dry blossoms; filling paper cups or bowls halfway with silica gel, embedding flower heads, covering with more gel, and zapping them for a minute or two. I haven’t tried this method myself but have seen good results. Flower petals and small bundles of flowers —particularly rose and peony blossoms— may also be dried flat and later displayed on platter arrangements or used in potpourri. Combining petals with preserved herbs and oils is a nice, traditional way to add the subtle scent of nature to closed rooms during long winter months.

dried peony petals two - michaela medina - thegardenerseden.com Whole, Dried Peony Blossoms Sit Atop a Pile of Pretty Pink and Peach Petals

Ornamental grasses and ferns can also make beautiful additions to dried arrangements. With the exception of a few early ‘bloomers’, I harvest and dry most ornamental grasses in late summer and early autumn. After the inflorescences are completely open, I gather up large, arching grasses, rushes and sedges —Miscanthus, Panicum, Scirpus, etc— and arrange them in floor vases and urns. Shorter grasses can be tied and air-dried upside down with flowers and herbs. I also gather extra grasses and store them out of the way —in empty florists buckets— for use in wreaths and winter arrangements. Many ferns can be successfully dried as well. Christmas ferns (Polystichum acrostichoides) and Painted ferns (Athyrium nipponicum), dry particularly well when pressed, and combine beautifully with autumn leaves and flowers; both dried and freshly harvested.

I’ll be writing more about preserving summer’s bounty in the coming weeks. In meantime, feel free to share the names of your favorite dried flowers and/or preservation methods in comments here on the blog, or on this site’s Facebook page, here.

Wool Rush (Scirpus cyperinus) - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com With its Fuzzy, Cinnamon-Hued Inflorescences and Strong, Stately Stems, North American, Native Wool Rush or Woolgrass (Scirpus cyperinus) is a Beautiful Addition to Late Summer and Autumn Perennial Borders and Floral Arrangements

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

Do you enjoy The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through affiliate links. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to this site, helping to cover web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you so much for your support!

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All Hail, Amazing Kale! Jennifer Audette On Summer’s Hippest Superfood & Sumptuous Peach, Corn & Kale Salad . . .

August 3rd, 2013 § 6 comments § permalink

Peach, Corn and Kale Salad - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comPeach, Corn & Kale Salad, Recipe Below

Kale, glorious kale. A member of the extensive Brassica oleracea species (cultivars: cabbage, broccoli, kohlrabi, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, savoy), kale is in the acephala group, which means “headless”. Kale and its nearly identical partner, collards, are likely quite similar to the earliest forms of cultivated cabbage, which were also non-head forming and known to be in cultivation for thousands of years.  The word “kale” is apparently Scottish in origin stemming from the Roman coles and caulis, their words for cabbage. Bet you can guess where the words “cauliflower” and “cole crops” come from now, too. In medieval times this group of vegetables was known as coleworts or colewyrts.

Like my favorite Vermont-made t-shirt says, we should all “Eat More Kale”, but kale can be a hard sell, even to people who love their veggies. Does the idea of kale cause you to cringe as you picture bitter greens lumped in a foreboding pile on your plate like a gustatory penance for all the junk food you ate this week? Well you’re in luck, because I’m here, a Kale Krusader, to convert you.

Redbor and Rainbow Lacinato Kale Harvest - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comHarvesting Tender Leaves of Redbor & Rainbow Lacinato Kale

Kale can be planted each spring as soon as the soil is workable, which we all know is the time when gardeners chomp-at-the-bit to stick hope into the cold earth and wait for it to grow. So, don’t you dare plant tomatoes, peppers and green beans in early May as a desperate attempt to get a jump on the season only to have failed germination and frost-killed seedlings! You should be planting seeds or six-packs of kale instead! Winterbor is my favorite variety because I like how the ruffle-y leaves trap dressings and seasonings. But there are other varieties: Lacinato (dinosaur kale), Red Russian, Rainbow Russian, Red Winterbor and many others.

Rainbow Lacinato Kale - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Rainbow Lacinato Kale with Lovely Hints of Lavender, Blue and Turquoise, is Even Pretty in Edible Floral Arrangements

I have grown kale easily from seed in the past, but now prefer to purchase six-packs of healthy starts.  The tiny, tentative leaves emerging from seeds were harder for me to protect from the darn slugs. The more mature six-pack starts seem to stand up better to moderate slug and snail abuse.  Kale prefers well-drained, organically rich soil with a pH of 6.0 to 7.0 and full sun.  The most common pest you’ll find on your kale is the cabbage worm, the larval stage of those pretty little white cabbage butterflies. Dark green frass (fancy word for poop), collecting on the stems of your kale plants will give the little buggers away.  So, do a daily walk-through looking for frass. If you find any, search for the well-camouflaged cabbage worm. It will be almost the exact color of the kale stem. Pick it off and dispose of by your preferred method. (I throw them onto the driveway, hoping that birds might eat them. I’m not sure if this system actually works as planned since I’ve never done a follow-up study of my disposal method.) Kale is very easy to grow and produces from early spring right through late fall. They say frosts make the leaves sweeter, but honestly, I’ve never noticed a big difference.  This year, the neighborhood woodchuck took a liking to my kale and in early July ate most of my crop (18 plants).  But once the woodchuck problem was solved (a story for another day), the kale recovered even stronger than before and on it grows.  Go kale, go!

Young Redbor Kale Leaf - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Beautiful, Curly Redbor Kale is Great for Holding Dressing and Seasoning, or Fancying Up a Serving Bowl

So with the growing part out of the way I can hear you wondering, “yeah, but what’s so great about eating the stuff?” I’m glad you asked! When you grow your own kale you can pick it right before you’re going to eat it so it’s fresh and tender. You don’t get stuck with excessive bits of the hard, fibrous ribs like you get in a bag of kale from the grocery store. You can harvest the younger leaves for salads. Save the more hearty leaves to braise atop golden-brown onions and garlic for 20 minutes (adding small amounts of water to keep from burning). Then toss with a good squirt of fresh lemon juice, olive oil, parmesan cheese and serve over your favorite pasta. You can tear kale leaves into bite-sized pieces and sprinkle over the top of a pizza before popping it into the oven. The edges of the kale will get crisp and nutty while the part in contact with the pizza stays tender.  And if you missed the craze of “Kale Chips”, just do an internet search and you’ll find plenty of recipes for the simple-to-make, healthy, addictive, salty snack.  You can make a dressing with tahini, tamari, red wine vinegar, garlic and water then toss with torn kale leaves. Top with tomato, cucumber and avocado.

Ingredients for Peach, Corn and Kale Salad - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Fresh Ingredients from the Garden and Walker Farm Make Great Companions for Homegrown Kale

But hands down, this is my new favorite thing to make with kale. This salad appeared in my life just three weeks ago and I’ve made it four times since then. Because kale is so hearty, it holds up as leftovers even under an acidic dressing that would wilt lesser greens. So this recipe is great to make in a big batch to have for quick, healthy lunches and dinner side dishes for several days.  If there’s still time where you live to buy local corn and perfectly ripe peaches, you should make this salad post haste. I think there will be a few kale converts among the ranks.

Peach, Corn and Kale Salad with Wine - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Kale, Peach and Corn Salad

(adapted from a recipe at NPR.com)

Ingredients for 6 servings

Dressing

½ cup olive oil (the better the quality, the better your dressing)

¼ cup of freshly squeezed lime juice (or more to taste)

2 Tablespoons red wine vinegar

1 teaspoon honey

Salt and Pepper to taste

1 cup of red onion very thinly sliced into half moons

In a medium bowl, whisk together the oil, lime juice, vinegar, honey, salt & pepper. Add the thinly sliced onion, stir and allow to sit for 15 minutes or so. This mellows the flavors and softens the onion.

Salad

1 bunch of kale, (maybe about 10 – 12 small to medium stalks) washed, dried and torn into smaller pieces

½ a bunch of cilantro, stems removed and leaves torn, or to taste

4 ears of corn, uncooked, cut off the cob

4 peaches, peeled, cut into wedges

4 oz. of feta or to taste (I use Vermont’s Maplebrook Cheese and it’s delicious!)

Rainbow Lacinato and Redbor Kale - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Method

Combine the kale and cilantro in a large bowl. Pour dressing over greens. Toss well, making sure to get the dressing over every piece of kale. Then add the corn kernels, the peach slices and the feta.  If you can let the salad rest, (refrigerated or not) for about an hour, the kale will absorb more dressing and soften slightly.  Keep leftovers refrigerated.  Enjoy!

Peach, Corn and Kale Salad Mixing - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Toss the Ingredients Together Well and Let Stand in the Refrigerator for One Hour or More, Before Serving

The best thing about eating so much kale is that it’s one of those supposed “superfoods”, which means I can drink more wine and eat more dessert with less guilt, right?  Hurray!

I know there are other kale-lovers out there in TGE-land. Got any great recipes to share?

Peach, Corn and Kale Salad and Wine - michaela m harlow - thegardenerseden.comA Sumptuous Summer Salad & Crisp White Wine Make a Perfect Light Dinner for Two on a Sultry, August Evening

Today’s guest blogger, multi-talented writer Jennifer Audette is author of the always entertaining and often humorous Cozy Toes BlogspotWhen not experimenting with canning, baking, cooking, horticulture, entomology or other scientific pursuits, Jennifer can be found writing, hiking, making music, working at Walker Farm and delivering smiles to her very fortunate friends.

Travel back to Jennifer’s previous post on Dilly Beans by clicking here.  

Thank you Jen! xo 

Article ⓒ Jennifer Audette, Photography ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you! 

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