Autumn Florals: An Introduction to Pastel Drawing & Painting at Beautiful Walker Farm, Dummerston, Vermont

September 14th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Come and Learn Pastel Drawing and Painting Techniques with Beautiful Walker Farm Flowers as Our Subject

Come join me at beautiful Walker Farm, RT5, Dummerston, VT on the first day of fall –September 22nd– for an introductory floral still life workshop focusing on pastel techniques and materials (hard and soft pastels, pastel pencils, paper supports, and various fixatives), with gorgeous, WalkerFarm autumn flowers as our subject.

Autumn Florals: An Introduction to Pastel Drawing & Painting for Beginners

September 22, 2018

10 am –  12 pm

Walker Farm, RT 5, Dummerston, Vermont

$45 Special Introductory Price Includes Materials & Fresh Cut, Walker Farm Flowers

Introductory Class Limited to 10 People

To reserve your place, please email: michaela (at) thegardenerseden (dot) com

 

Article and Images copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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These Last Golden Days

September 13th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Monarch on Hydrangea paniculata ‘Limelight’

With little more than a week of summer remaining, I find myself looking back on the season with a twinge of sadness. Although I adore autumn, I wonder how it arrived so quickly. Spring was late this year, and our hot, rainy summer went a bit too fast. When did the Hermit Thrush stop singing? Where did the wild raspberries go?

September’s Garden: Rudbeckia fulgida, Miscanthus purpurascens, Miscanthus sinensis, Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’, Hepacodium miconioides

Glancing across the room, blushing hydrangea, golden wildflowers and ripe peaches fill my countertop. It’s still summer, but it’s certainly feels like autumn on this misty, moody day. Perhaps a stroll through the garden and a home-baked galette will raise some cheer.

Rudbeckia subtomentosa ‘Henry Eilers’

 

Article and Photography copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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Welcoming Late Summer’s Slow, Shadowy, Seductive Beauty . . .

September 4th, 2018 § 2 comments § permalink

Ligularia dentata ‘Britt-Marie Crawford’ in the Secret Garden

September is truly my favorite Summer month. In fact, now through early December is my preferred season to be outside and in the garden. Everyone loves springtime, of course, but when you’re employed in the field of horticulture and landscape design, it’s hard to find the time to enjoy it. May and June are busy, busy months in the garden. September is different. Although the days are getting shorter and my task list is getting longer, things still seem just a little less urgent. We’re still in a summer state-of-mind. The first day of autumn is three weeks away and plenty of hot, hazy days remain. My hammock yet beckons.

Of course it’s the September garden that I adore: sky blue asters, voluptuous hydrangeas, showgirl dahlias, fragrant fairy candles, feathery grasses. I love to wander through the blowzy perennial borders at this time of year, gathering bouquets and admiring butterflies. And sometimes I’ll just sprawl out in the middle of lawn, watching fluffy, white clouds drift by while listening to the chorus of crickets.

September’s Quiet Summer Beauty

Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’, Ligularia dentata ‘Britt-Marie Crawford’, self-sown Rudbeckia hirta ‘Becky’ and Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’, in early September 

 

Article and Photography copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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Going Buggy: Let’s Talk About Tussock Moth Caterpillars

September 2nd, 2018 § 4 comments § permalink

On the Left, Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Lophocampa caryae), and on the Right, White-Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Orgyia leucostigma)

Suddenly, it’s September, and everywhere I look, there are hints of a changing season. One of the first autumnal signs I’ve noticed this year is the appearance of fuzzy, colorful, and boldly-patterned Tussock Moth caterpillars. Although these hungry little critters do tend to skeletonize the foliage of certain trees, and sometimes, during large infestations, they can cause trouble with crop trees, their late-season noshing is usually a minor aesthetic issue, (Hickory Tussocks mainly munch deciduous elm, ash, oak, willow, nut and of course, hickory trees, while White-Marked Tussocks and Definite Tussock Moths, usually prefer apple, birch, elm, maple, cherry and sometimes conifers such as balsam fir and larch).  However, the black and white, Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Lophocampa caryae, pictured atop, at left), has recently caught some bad press as a “venomous caterpillar”. So, what’s the scoop?

The Definite Tussock Moth (Orgyia definita), is Easy to ID with its Yellow Head and Body, Black spots and White-Blond Hairs. 

Indeed, the spines of many Tussocks –including, but not limited to the black and white, Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar— do contain a venom to ward off predators. When handled, this venom can rub off on the skin, sometimes causing a red, stinging, itchy rash. For most people, the reaction is mild, and can be treated with ice and over-the-counter rash medication, however some individuals –particularly children and adults with sensitive skin– will experience more discomfort than others. For this reason, it’s best to avoid handling all Tussock Moth Caterpillars, unless wearing gloves. Most wild creatures do prefer to be left alone, so I try to simply observe and enjoy insects, and all other wild things, from a respectful distance, without touching or disturbing them at all.

For more information about Tussock Moths and their Caterpillars, visit BugGuide.net or MothAndCaterpillars.org.

Look, But Don’t Touch! Some People Experience Allergic Reaction to Tussock Moth Caterpillar Venom. Avoiding Contact is the Best Defense. Most Creatures Prefer Not to be Handled Anyway. 

Article and Photography copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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