Here Come the Citrus!

January 16th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

Calamondin Orange Trees Blossom & Fruit Simultaneously, Providing Sporadic Harvests Throughout the Year and a House Filled with Seductive Scent

It’s citrus season here in my indoor eden, and although the harvest does not include larger fruits, these Meyer lemons, Calamondin oranges and Key limes still pack a powerful punch. Is there anything more uplifting than a jolt of tart-sweet flavor and brilliant color on a northern table at this time of year? It’s almost enough to make you forget the coming nor’easter!

I’m sure I’ll be sharing a citrus-based recipe or two over the coming weeks, but in meantime you may want to consider adding a tree to your own home. Calamondin oranges are easy to grow and perform much better as houseplants than other citrus trees. Meyer lemons are another good choice, and Key limes also do well. Travel back to last year’s post —Calamondin Orange: Sunshine in a Pot— to learn more about selecting and growing Calamondins and other citrus trees indoors.

The Calamondin’s are Comin’ On

Article and Images copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

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Sweet & Spicy Southwestern Frittata: Vegetarian & Delicious!

January 8th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

Sweet & Spicy Southwestern Frittata Warms Chilly Winter Days

On these dark, chilly winter days, I often crave something hot and spicy to warm me up and get me going or to provide cozy comfort after a raw afternoon spent sanding the driveway. With a freezer full of colorful summer vegetables —like corn and bell peppers— big, fluffy frittatas have been finding their way to the kitchen table at least once a week for breakfast or dinner.

To make this favorite dish healthier, yet still substantial enough to serve at the center of a meal, I’ve been swapping a favorite, new vegan option —Field Roast Mexican Chipotle Sausage in place of the usual chorizo or bacon in recipes. The first time I tasted Field Roast’s delicious alternatives to animal products, I was wowed by both their flavor and texture. Soon, I found myself slipping them into chili, casseroles and pastas. When I snuck Field Roast’s Mexican Chipotle Sausage into my southwestern frittata, not only did the vegan sausage slip by unnoticed, but the delicious, spicy links actually drew compliments from devoted carnivores. Served with a fresh salad and oven-roasted potatoes, this southwestern frittata is great for Meatless Monday and even makes a brunch or dinner guest worthy meal. How are you using up your frozen garden bounty this winter?

Sweet & Spicy Southwest Frittata

Special Equipment:

12” cast iron skillet (or other oven-proof skillet)

Ingredients:

8 Large eggs

1/4 Cup milk

1 Cup grated cheddar cheese

1 Tbs olive oil

2 Links (184g) Field Roast Mexican Chipotle Sausage, cut to bite size pieces

1/2 Cup fresh or frozen corn kernels, thawed

1 Orange or red bell pepper, seeded and sliced into bite size bits

3 Scallions, including green tops, coarsely chopped

1 Jalapeño pepper, seeded and diced

1/2 Tbs fresh cilantro leaves, chopped

Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

  1. Adjust oven to upper rack & preheat to broil.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together eggs and milk. Season with salt & pepper to taste. Stir in 1/2 cup of the cheddar cheese, reserving remainder of the cheese for later.
  3. Heat the olive oil in cast iron skillet on medium-high.
  4. Add sausage bits and sauté on medium high until lightly brown. Using a slotted spatula or spoon, remove to plate and set aside.
  5. Add scallions, jalapeño, bell pepper to skillet and sauté until soft (3 minutes). Add corn and sauté another minute. Add salt and fresh ground pepper to taste.
  6. Return sausage to skillet and immediately pour in the egg mixture. Adjust heat to medium and cook, stirring and turning, scraping from bottom up, creating loose curd throughout (about 2 minutes).
  7. Top the frittata with the remaining 1/2 cup of cheddar cheese while continuing to cook, undisturbed, another couple of minutes to set bottom and sides.
  8. Using an oven mitt, place the skillet in the oven and broil for a couple of minutes until golden brown. Watch closely!
  9. Remove from oven and sprinkle with cilantro. Allow frittata to cool a few minutes before cutting and serving

Article and Images copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

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Welcome Stick Season: In Praise of Beautiful Bark & Colorful Twigs

January 7th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

Cornus sericea : Fire in Ice

In New England, winter is often referred to as stick season. It’s not a term of endearment. November, December, January and February are long, dark months, and by March we are truly longing for the green leaves that won’t appear ‘til May. Six months is a long time to live without color and for this reason alone, planning a winter garden is important.

Betula papyrifera: Chalky White Beauty from a Distance and Peachy Peels Up Close

Why do so many gardeners overlook this long season when planning and planting in springtime? My guess is that by May, when garden centers finally open, it’s just impossible for for twigs to compete with flowers! Perhaps anticipating the distraction will provide incentive to design a four season garden in January!

The Backlit Beauty of Acer griseum’s Auburn Curls

Feeling bit of mid-winter cabin fever? Travel back to my winter garden design posts —such as this one from last year— for a little insiration, then take a stroll around your yard with a camera in hand. Now come back inside where it’s warm, pour a hot cup of tea, and pull out your photos and a notepad. How could you add to the picture? Cornus sericea twigs for vertical red or chartreuse lines? Betula papyrifera for peeling, peachy cream scrolls or Acer griseum for curls of orange and rust? Perhaps the multicolored exfoliation of Stewartia pseudocamilla, Cornus kousa or Halesia tetraptera, among others. And remember the many flowering beauties with hidden, winter interest: Heptacodium miconioides, Hydrangea quercifolia and Physocarpus opulifolius to name a favorite few.

I Enjoy the Brilliant Bark of Cornus sericea and Cornus alba Cultivars on Garden Walks as Well as from Windows, Throughout the Winter Months


Article and Images copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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Happy New Year & Welcome 2019

January 2nd, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

Acer palmatum Wears a Cloak of Ice

Welcome, a very warm welcome indeed, to 2019. Last year was a tough one, filled with great loss, and I am eager to turn the page. Although we must wait until March for rebirth to begin in the garden, extra minutes of daylight have already begun to add length to our days.

I am grateful.

Secret Garden, Bejeweled for New Year’s Celebrations

Article and Images copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

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