Misty Glasshouse Dreaming

April 19th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Favorite Dreary-Day Escape: Seeking Inspiration at Lyman Conservatory, Smith College Botanic Garden, Northampton, MA

Melancholy mornings, moody afternoons and long, rainy weekends; I can think of a hundred-and-one excuses for a trip to Smith College’s Lyman Conservatory. But when spring is this raw and wintry weather so unrelenting, I really crave the warm, humid comfort of a glorious greenhouse.

Fern House Magic: Lyman’s Wardian Case Vignettes Have Long Been a Point of Delight. This Spot Stirs Up My Shade Garden Fantasies  

 With planting season right around the corner —and annual pot displays on my mind— Lyman Conservatory has once again become my favorite place for a bit of tropical design inspiration.  It’s always great fun to play with exotic colors and textures in seasonal planting beds and summertime pots. Where perennials, shrubs and trees are permanent investments —requiring careful planning and placement— annual and tropical plants are temporary, lighthearted guests in our New England landscape. Like summer lovers, they invite us to kick off our shoes and relax a bit. Go ahead, let your hair down they say. Stop taking this gardening business so seriously.

Here’s a look at few more things that recently caught my eye in the greenhouse . . .

Clivia miniata ‘Grandiflora’. What About Orange? Such an Under Utilized Beauty in New England Gardens. People are Often Scared of Committing to Orange. So Try it in a Pot! 

Inspired by a Light and Airy Touch, I’m Thinking Palm Fronds and Swaying Blossoms to Catch the Breeze on My Balcony. Glowing Brazilian Candles (Triplochlamys multiflora, aka Pavonia multiflora, Malvaceae, Brazil), at Lyman Conservatory, Smith College Botanic Garden And What About Those Shady Spots? Ooh, folia, folia. Double fantasia. Begonia brevimirosa ssp. exotica. Always Consider the Leaf! Hot Pink and Fuchsia? Yes, Yes, Yes! 

I can’t wait to get back to Smith Botanic Garden for another color charge!

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Calamondin Orange Marmalade: Homemade Beauty for Breakfast . . .

March 23rd, 2018 § 7 comments § permalink

Beauty for Breakfast: Calamondin Orange Marmalade & Vintage Roses 

I really, really wanted a vacation this winter, but fate had other things in mind and personal responsibilities held me close to home. So, I’ve been giving myself mini-staycations to compensate a bit. These weekend retreats —usually nothing more extravagant than a new book, homemade pâtisserie or a trip to the greenhouse— have really made a difference. This new awakening —a beauty renaissance of sorts— seems to be giving my days the je ne sais quoi that I have been seeking. Can the key to happiness be as simple as setting a lovely breakfast table with flowers, fresh-baked bread and homemade Calamondin Orange Marmalade? Perhaps it is not so easy, but I think I may be on to something. There is joy to be found in the creation of a beautiful, everyday experience.

Calamondin Oranges are One of the Easier-to-Grow, Indoor Citrus Trees. For Tips, Click Here to Visit My Previous Post on Growing Citrus Indoors.My Own Calamondin Oranges, Freshly Picked from the Tree Making Your Own Pot of Gold: Calamondin Orange Marmalade

Today’s lesson: celebrate the beauty surrounding you by appreciating, using, and savoring what you’ve got. If you’re a gardener, this is pretty simple in summertime. But in winter? You’ll have to look a bit harder. Have a terrarium or beautiful houseplant? Set that in the middle of your dining room table. Have frozen blueberries in your freezer? Make blueberry popover pancake. Grow herbs on your windowsill? Bake a loaf of No-Knead Rosemary Bread. Have a citrus tree? Harvest some fruit and make a batch of marmalade. It’s amazing how gratitude fosters happiness.

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C a l a m o n d i n   O r a n g e   M a r m a l a d e

Special Equipment:

Food processor, non-corrosive saucepan, candy thermometer, canning jars/lids and canning kit

Ingredients:

1          cup calamondin orange juice/pulp/rind (40-50 calamondin oranges)

1          cup water

2          cups granulated sugar

Have an extra-large harvest of Calamondins? This recipe can be doubled.

Method: 

Wash 40-50 calamondin oranges and pat dry. Slice fruits in half at the equator. Holding fruit over a large liquid measuring cup or small bowl, remove seeds and discard. Fit a slicing blade inside a food processor and toss fruit, rind, pulp, juice and all, into the bowl. Pulse two or three times until the rinds are cut up to the consistency of marmalade. Do not over-process or puree. You can also squeeze the juice/pulp into a bowl and slice the rinds by hand if you don’t have access to a food processor.

Pour the fruit juice/pulp/rind into a large, liquid measuring cup. You should have about 1 cup, but the juiciness of fruit varies. Add water to the reach the 2 cup line and stir well.

Pour the orange/water mixture into a medium sized, non-corrosive saucepan (large if you are making a double batch). Bring to a rolling boil, stirring constantly. Slowly, over 10-15 minutes time, add sugar in small amounts and continue to stir the boiling, bubbling mixture. Be sure each amount of sugar dissolves before adding more. After approximately 20 minutes, use a candy thermometer to check the temperature. Remove from heat when the marmalade hits 228°F.

Carefully pour marmalade into sterilized canning jars and seal. Process marmalade in a boiling water canner (5-15 mins according to your altitude and USDA safe canning instructions). USDA instructions for safe canning may be found here.

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Vintage Roses. Oh. Vintage Roses . . .

March 21st, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Vintage Roses: Beautiful Varieties for Home and Garden

There are books a gardener buys to further her education; design specific titles or academic tomes covering the nitty gritty details of horticulture like entomology, botany and soil science. Practical books. Then there are the books a gardener orders just for sheer, visual pleasure. This latter group is the secret stack you pull up on your lap when the wind is howling and the snow is blowing sideways and you just can not stand another moment of dreary weather. You crave the sun-drenched hues and sweet fragrances of summer. This has nothing to do with practicality. It’s time to dream. You need Vintage Roses.

Rx for Winter-Weary Blues: Pull on Your Most Decadent Robe, Pour Yourself a Glass of Bubbly and Dream Away the Hours with Jane Eastoe’s Vintage Roses

I confess that I am on a complete, unabashed, beauty kick. This whole thing got started a couple of months ago, with a copy of Georgianna Lane’s Paris in Bloom (and yes, to be honest, you’re probably going to want to order it, too). That delightful Pandora’s Box —a gift, courtesy of my dear and thoughtful friend Mel— lead me to European trip dreaming, beautiful tart baking and some mighty-gorgeous garden book buying; including a copy of Jane Eastoe and Georgianna Lane’s Vintage Roses.

Warning: Paris in Bloom is a Beauty Addict’s Gateway Drug

Thanks to Georgianna Lane’s Paris in Bloom, I’m Baking Beautiful Tarts and Ogling Beautiful Flowers (yes, more tart recipes are forthcoming).

It’s late March in New England —land of the purposefully prepared— and I’m fed up with all things practical. I’m sick of wool hats, jumper cables, emergency flashlights, ugly plastic shovels, AAA membership renewal notices and road salt. I’m done with bulky coats, studded tires, four-wheel-drive, insulated coffee mugs, hand warmers, road flares, snow blowers, winter weather advisories and ice scrapers. It’s time for summer dresses, sandals, garden parties and ROSES.

One of my favororites: Munstead Wood, a David Austin introduction, beautifully photographed for Vintage Roses by Georgianna Lane

Roses aren’t practical. In fact, roses are so far from practical, they almost make me dance with giddiness. I’ve been a professional horticulturist all my working life, and if anyone tells you that roses are low-maintenance garden plants they are a) selling you something or b) delusional. Roses are prickly, fussy, demanding divas! Blackspot, powdery mildew, wilt, spider mites, rose slugs, aphids; if you are going to grow roses, this is just a short list of your new enemies. So, call me crazy . . .But what is a garden without a rose?

True, when it comes to the genus Rosa, some species and cultivars do make better garden plants than others. This is where a bit of plant-to-garden matchmaking comes in handy. Thanks to Georgianna Lane’s gorgeous flower portraits, Vintage Roses is a virtual who’s who of garden beauties. But beyond it’s obvious aesthetic allure, Vintage Roses also functions as a wonderful, modern rose-match-making tool for gardeners. In addition to providing historic background on each beautifully photographed rose, Jane Eastoe also carefully lists the growth and flowering habit as well as the cultural requirements of each cultivar.

Another David Austin introduction, Fighting Temeraire is a tall, fragrant, mixed border favorite. This Turner fan also loves the historic art reference. Beautifully photographed for Vintage Roses, in situ, by Georgianna Lane.

I grow a number of the shrubs featured in Vintage Roses, and have planted many in client gardens. I will happily vouch for both their beauty and vigor. Constance Spry —that voluptuous, pink coquette— covers an entire wall with thorny, nasty canes and yet she blooms only once per season.  B U T . . . Oh how I relish the memory of those three, glorious weeks in June for the rest of the year. She’s truly a favorite. And then there’s Rose de Rescht. Such a reliable beauty. Sure, I’m fighting her prickly thorns whenever I snip those short-stemmed blossoms for a bud vase, but she blooms to beat the band. And come late September? Oh those fragrant, cold roses are truly unforgettable.

Vintage Roses Gathered from My Own Garden: Rose de Rescht, Constance Spry and Bibi Maizoon

Sick of winter? Well, join me then. Brew a pot of Earl Grey and serve yourself a decadent plate of pâtisserie. Then, wrap yourself in a luxurious hour or two with Vintage Roses. Soon, the snow will melt and Springtime will draw near. Those dirty snowbanks will soon be but a distant memory. In meantime, you’ll have your vintage roses ordered and be ready to slip those beauties in the ground.

In My Garden, Vintage Beauty Rose de Rescht Blooms Past the Frost

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Neither product nor compensation were provided for the review of Vintage Roses.

Photography, with exceptions noted above, is copyright Michaela Harlow at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

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Welcome, Spring?

March 20th, 2018 § 2 comments § permalink

Camellia japonica ‘Imbricata Rubra Plena’ at Lyman Conservatory, Smith College Botanic Garden

The Vernal Equinox occurs at 12:15 p.m. Eastern Time today, but it sure doesn’t feel like spring. True, there may be signs here and there —increasing daylight, bird song, pussy willows— but the air is still chilly and a thick blanket of snow covers the ground. For a couple of weeks, I entertained the idea of jetting off for Spring in Paris, but it seems Winter has that on her itinerary as well. Ho well. Guess I’ll be hibernating in the kitchen with my citrus trees and humidifying my skin at Lyman Conservatory for a wee bit longer!

While Waiting for the Thaw: Tarty Lime Tart to Nibble & Blooming Books to Review

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It Sifts from Leaden Sieves, It Powders All the Wood . . .

March 15th, 2018 § 4 comments § permalink

It sifts from leaden sieves,
It powders all the wood,
It fills with alabaster wool
The wrinkles of the road.

It makes an even face
Of mountain and of plain, —
Unbroken forehead from the east
Unto the east again.

It reaches to the fence,
It wraps it, rail by rail,
Till it is lost in fleeces;
It flings a crystal veil

On stump and stack and stem, —
The summer’s empty room,
Acres of seams where harvests were,
Recordless, but for them.

It ruffles wrists of posts,
As ankles of a queen, —
Then stills its artisans like ghosts,
Denying they have been.

Emily Dickinson

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Nibbling Lemon Tart as the Snow Falls

March 11th, 2018 § 2 comments § permalink

Meyer Lemon Tart 

What is it about late-winter snow storms that inspires me to bake? Perhaps it’s the warm oven and comforting aromas, or maybe it’s post-snow-shovel sugar cravings? Either way, this has always been the case for me. Of course, baking during a blizzard —when the threat of a power outage looms large— is a big risk.  So, I try to think of things I can bake in less than an hour. Snow also means using the ingredients on hand, since travel is out of the question.

Walking back from my tractor after making a quick, snow-clearing pass down the drive, I paused to admire the snow-dusted Witch Hazel. Oh, sugar-sprinkled lemon tart? Inspiration struck! Homegrown citrus —lemon, lime and calamondin— I usually have from my own trees (see tips for growing your own citrus here). This year, my Meyer Lemon has been a little stingy —I think I brought it inside a bit late, exposing it to frost— but it has finally relented; offering up 3 ripe fruits. Fresh eggs? Check. Butter? Check. Cream? Oh yes . . . Always. Time for a lemon tart!

Inspiration for a Sugar-Dusted Tart: Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Arnold Promise’

Dressed with Half a Container of Organic Raspberries & Dusted with Confectioner’s Sugar

Hamilton Beech Commercial Citrus Juicer. Less-than-Perfect Lemons = Perfectly Fine Juice for a Perfectly Delicious Tart

I am a fresh citrus lover. Long before I began growing my own lemons, limes and calamondins, I started pressing fresh juice for drinking, cooking, baking and cocktail-making. For years I had a cumbersome and flimsy citrus press, then voila, this fantastic, Hamilton Beech commercial citrus juicer appeared beneath the tree one Christmas and I have never looked back. If you love pressing citrus, this tool will make short work (and fun), of the process. I find that I get more juice (and if double pressing, pulp too), when using a strong press.

M e y e r    L e m o n    T a r t

I n g r e d i e n t s 

One pre-baked, sweet tart shell (see recipe below)

½     cup Meyer lemon juice (about 2-3 lemons & their zest, depending upon size)

2     eggs

3     egg yolks

6     tbs sugar

2     tbs cream

pinch of fine salt

6     tbs best-quality, unsalted butter, cut into 6 pieces

Confectioner’s Sugar & Organic Raspberries for Decoration/Serving

M e t h o d 

Juice the lemons, (I love my Hamilton Beech commercial citrus juicer), pressing as much pulp as possible through the strainer, and grate the peels. Add both juice and peel together, in a small bowl (watch for and remove seeds, if hand pressing). Beat eggs and egg yolks together with sugar until just mixed. Add egg/sugar mixture to a heavy saucepan and warm over low heat. Add cream, stirring constantly. Add the juice mixture, again stirring non-stop as you go. Add the salt and then the butter pieces, slowly stirring as they melt. When the mixture thickens enough to coat a spoon, remove from the heat and allow to sit 5 minutes. Whisk to smooth and pour into a bowl. Cover and refrigerate to chill for about a half hour or keep chilled for up to two weeks.

Preheat an oven to 375°F.

Fill the cooled, pre-baked tart shell (do not over-fill), and place in the oven for 20-25 minutes or until just set (slightly puffed and firmed but still a bit wobbly at center). Remove and allow to cool for an hour before serving or place in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours.

If refrigerating, allow the tart to come back to room temperature (about an hour), before serving. When the tart has reached room temp, garnish with raspberries, dust with confectioner’s sugar & serve.

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P â t e    S a b l é e

(Sweet Dough for 9″ Tart)

Adapted from Dorie Greenspan’s Baking Chez Moi

I n g e d i e n t s 

1 ½     cups (201 grams) all-purpose flour

½     cup (60 grams)  confectioner’s sugar

¼     tsp grated lemon zest

¼     tsp fine sea salt

9 tbs (4 ½ oz/128 grams) chilled, best-quality, unsalted butter, cut in small pieces

1     large egg yolk

M e t h o d

Place the flour, sugar, lemon zest and salt in a food processor and pulse to blend. Lift the lid and scatter butter over dry ingredients. Cover again and pulse until the mixture is roughly the size of peas. Slowly add in yolk, mixing in short pulses. Then, increase pulsing to 10 second intervals until the dough forms small clumps. Stop here. Do not overwork. Rinse your hands in ice water, dry and turn the dough out onto a work surface.

Mix with the heel of your hand, smearing across the counter, rather than kneading, until blended. Gather up in a ball and flatten to a disk.

Butter a tart pan (I like to use a removable bottom tart pan), and evenly press the dough over the bottom and up the sides. Do not overwork. Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork and cover with foil. Place in a freezer for about an hour or longer —or overnight— before removing to bake.

Center an oven rack and preheat to 400°F.

Place the frozen tart on a cookie sheet and bake blind for 25-30 minutes (or until golden brown). You need not use pie weights if you have properly chilled the tart, it should not shrink much. Remove from the oven and cool for at least ½ hour before adding lemon filling.

Meyer Lemons and Tart

Post-Nor’easter: Eighteen Inches of New-Fallen Snow in the Garden

Meyer Lemon Tart: Antidote to Late-Winter Blues

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Narcissus, Tulipa & Fragrant Hyacinth: Smith Botanic Garden’s 2018 Bulb Show

March 7th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Tulipa, Narcissus & Sweetly Fragrant Hyacinth at Lyman Conservatory

It’s 3:30 p.m. and snow is falling steadily here in Southern Vermont. The forecast is calling for 5-8  inches overnight. These late winter storms can really give a gardener the blues, but I knew this nor’easter was coming, so I prepared. Bread and milk? Oh, no, no, no. Tulipa, Narcissus and Hyacinthus, thank you very much. I skipped the grocery line and did my pre-storm prep at Smith College Botanic Garden’s 2018 Bulb Show at Lyman Conservatory . . .

Layers of Beauty: Narcissus & Tulipa Stepped Below a Regal Cycad in Lyman Conservatory

Gloriously Fragrant: Deep Violet Hyacinth with Osteospermum & Primula

Classically Arranged Tulips and Daffodils Surround Statuary, Backed by Columnar Thuja

Visiting the Smith Botanic Garden Bulb Show is great fun, of course. However, it can also provide wonderful design inspiration for your own springtime garden. I love seeing how the show is curated each year. With beautifully combined tropical plants and wild tangles of bare and blooming native branches, 2018’s Bulb Show is a strong thematic departure from last year’s Impressionist-inspired installation. The color combinations and fragrant selections were particularly stellar this year.

Bold Color & Texture to Inspire: Red Twig Dogwood & Pussy Willow Branches Combine with Hot Hued Tulips and Clivia at Lyman Conservatory

If you’ve popped a few daffodils in here and there, but never seriously considered planting bulbs en masse, visiting a spring bulb show or a large public garden in April or early May is quite likely all the convincing you’ll need. Looking critically will also provide evidence for why the creation of a well-considered design and planting plan is so important. Flower color, fragrance, form, texture, foliage and plant height are just a few of the obvious considerations when planting spring bulbs. Bloom time and length of flowering, moisture and sunlight requirements, drainage, foliage yellowing/die-back and perennial cover as well as nearby shrub or tree companions must all be taken into account. Bulb shows provide the perfect opportunity to spot flowers you like and combinations you prefer, in real-time. Take a notebook and use your camera to snap shots of plant tags as well as individual flowers and vignettes.

Stepping Up and Back on the Stairs to Observe the Drifts of Color in the Planting Scheme at the 2018 Smith Botanic Garden Bulb Show

Nothing compares to the joy of the first blossoms of springtime. If you happen to be in Northampton, Massachusetts between now and March 18th, 2018, I highly recommend a visit to the Spring Bulb Show in Lyman Conservatory at Smith College’s Botanic Garden. Visiting hours are 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM daily.
Friday, Saturday and Sunday extended hours 10:00 AM – 8:00 PM. The suggested donation is $5 per person. With so much fragrance and color, it’s like stepping out of a black and white film, on over the rainbow, and into the Land of Oz.

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Who, Who, Who? Who Cooks for You? The Beautiful Barred Owl, Of Course!

March 3rd, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Barred Owl (Strix varia), Surveys the Garden from a Fence Post

If you’ve spent time in the woods at dusk or dawn —or gone camping anywhere along the east coast— chances are you have heard a Barred Owl, even if you’ve never seen one. This beautiful raptor’s call, “Who cooks for you, who, who, who“, often followed by a maniacal cackle, is one of the first birdcalls that I could identify as a kid. To this day, I delight in barred owl eavesdropping at night. Their conversations (click here and listen to ‘duet’), fascinate me.

Barred owls are quite common in my deeply forested landscape. I often spot them at daybreak or in the lingering twilight —frequently along the edge of the woods. My garden fencepost (as you can see above), is a favorite hunting perch for rodents. How convenient for both of us! The Barred Owl prefers mature, mixed forests, where it nests in hollow tree cavities. Learn more about this important predator here, at All About Birds.

Now all I want to know is, what’s for dinner!

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Forward March: Signs of a New Season

March 1st, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Vernal Witch Hazel (Hamamelis vernalis) greets the sun

Although it’s a mostly-winter month —and oh how I dread the lion’s roar!— March is filled with the promise of springtime. Witch Hazel, Pussy Willow, Spring Heath, Snowdrops, Crocus: everywhere I look, the signs appear! And so I venture forth, into the garden, calling out the lamb.

Pussy Willow (Salix discolor)

 

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Create a Verdant Indoor Eden with Miniature Moss Gardens: Book Review

February 26th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Miniature Moss Gardens: Create Your Own Japanese Container Gardens

These last few weeks of winter can be the longest and gloomiest of the season. Just when the witch hazel begins to bloom, five inches of snow will fall and smother her glorious, golden petals. Late February and early March is my favorite time of the year to fantasize about a warm-weather escape. But when jetting off to a tropical island isn’t in the realm of possibility (raising my hand here), a weekend staycation filled with indoor gardening projects is often just the ticket.

Miniature Moss Gardens, by Megumi Oshima and Hideshi Kimura, has inspired me to ignore the sleet and snow, and focus on the fresh scent of potting soil, sheet moss and ivy. Looking to bring new life to your winter-weary interior? Perhaps share the hope of spring at your office? There’s nothing like a pop of green to remind us that soon our season will change. This beautiful how-to book is filled with indoor garden projects ranging from the simple (tea cup houseplants and tiny moss balls), to the complex (bonsai, tray landscapes or terrariums!).

Hanging Kokedama with Ivy

Bring Life to a Tabletop with Kokedama Beauty

Thrifty Container Garden Idea: Recycle an Old Teacup

I review many beautiful, inspiring garden books —but to be honest, few of them offer the detailed, step-by-step instructions required for true horticultural success. Miniature Moss Gardens is far and away one of the best how-to gardening books that I’ve seen in a long time. Authors Megumi Oshima, a plant consultant and interior designer with her own gardening shop, and Hideshi Kimura, a bonsai master and instructor with more than 20 years experience in his art, take the time to explain how moss grows, what it needs to thrive, and why it makes a great house plant. Not only are detailed supply lists and project instructions included in this book, but tips for maintaining your living creations are also provided for long-term success. Horticultural geeks like myself will be delighted by the inclusion of a moss identification and location guide as well as propagation tips —perfect for gardeners of all ages.

For garden-enthusiasts, there’s nothing like getting your hands covered in warm mud to banish those winter blues. Create a hanging kokedama for a gloomy window or tray garden for a lifeless countertop — it’s the perfect way to bring a little springtime energy into a room and share a bit of natural beauty with a friend. I can’t wait to play in the potting soil with my copy of Miniature Moss Gardens.From Bonsai and Kokedama to Dish Gardens and Terrariums, Miniature Moss Gardens will Show You How to Create Your Very Own, Japanese-Style Containers for an Enchanting, Indoor Eden 

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A copy of this book was provided by Tuttle Publishing in exchange for independent, un-biased review. No other compensation was received. The Gardener’s Eden is not an affiliate of Tuttle Publishing, but is an affiliate of Amazon.com.

Article copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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A Garden Made for Winter

February 17th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

A Winter Wonderland, Just Outside My Studio Door

Winter in New England can be long, dark, cold and dreary, to be certain. But if you are a lover of magical, frozen landscapes, beauty also abounds. By mid-February, I often find myself feeling a bit house-bound and restless. The cure for cabin fever? Why a garden walk and a bit of mid-winter pruning, followed by hot cocoa in the lounge chairs of course! If you design your landscape with winter in mind —keep those frost-proof pots and weather-proof furnishings in the garden— there’s plenty of beauty to take in while stretching your legs out-of-doors. Things looking a little ho-hum out there? Well now’s the time to take notice. Grab your camera, as well as pen and paper, then head outside for a good, critical look.

Dogwood Branches (Cornus sericea), in the Garden with Hoary Ice Crystals

When shopping for plants this spring, pay close attention to bark color and texture. Perhaps it won’t matter much in May —especially when compared to all of those bodacious blossoms at the garden center— but come January, you’ll be grateful for the advice. Some of my favorite shrubs, such as Cornus sericea or Cornus alba, while not unattractive during the growing season, are really nothing much to look at in June and July. But when those autumn leaves drop and the fog rolls in? POW.

 Winter Walkway with Layers of Textural Plantings

Another design tip worth sharing? Think texture! Layer your garden with nubby, fluffy, spiky and bristly trees, shrubs, perennials, vines and grasses. Plants with rough textures really catch the frost, snow and ice. There’s nothing better for creating a magical, winter wonderland. Mix conifers among the deciduous shrubs and perennials —especially those with colorful textures, bark and/or berries— to create contrast and depth. Creeping, horizontal and upright Juniperus, Taxus, Microbiota decussataPicea abies ‘Nidiformis,’ and Pinus mugo are just a few garden-worthy species that will add tremendous winter delight. Looking for shrubs with colorful fruit? Travel back in time to my post, “Oh, Tutti Frutti: It’s Candy Land Time! Magical & Colorful Ornamental Berries” for more ideas.

Siberian Cypress (Microbiota decussata) along the Northwestern Walkway, with Miscanthus sinensis and Viburnum Hedge, Beyond

 

Miscanthus sinensis Always Puts on a Great, Autumn-Late-Winter Show

In addition to trees and shrubs, there are so many winter-garden-worthy perennials plants, vines and ornamental grasses to consider when designing a four-season garden. Pay attention to species with semi-evergreen or evergreen foliage, large or plentiful seed pods —particularly the tough, bristly types and dark, smooth ones!— as well as grasses with durable stems, tufts and blades. Some long-standing, perennial favorites? Actaea, Amsonia, Baptisia, Coreopsis, Echinacea, Echinops, Echiveria, Eryngium, Eupatorium, Humulus, Hellebore, Liatris, Nepeta (especially taller species), Rodgersia, Rudbeckia, Salvia, Sedum and among others. As for ornamental grasses …Oh my, where do I start? I love our natives —including Panicum, Pennisetum, Calamagrostis, Carex, Chasmanthium, Festuca and Schizachyrium— but also adore exotics, such as Miscanthus and Hakonechloa. It all depends upon the location and look you are trying to create.

Tea Viburnum (Viburnum setigerum), is a Knock-Out from November through February. Colorful Berries Really Show-Off Planted with Buff-Colored Grasses or Green-Grey Conifers. Delight!

Of course, the most important aspect of winter garden plantings is location! Place these valuable additions to your garden design where you will be able to enjoy their colorful bristles, bark, berries and structural lines. I like to locate plants with winter-durable fruit, interesting seed pods, peeling bark and texture outside my favorite windows, where I can enjoy them throughout the year. Entryway gardens are always good spots for plantings, to be sure, but also mix winter interest plants thoughtfully along main walks and garden pathways; positioning them near kitchen windows, bathrooms and in places where you might spy them while doing paperwork at your desk. It pays to plan now, and make notes for spring planting season.

Rosé for Breakfast? Why Not? Even if I’m Stuck Indoors, This Garden Vignette, Visible from My Windows, Fills Me with Joy.

When high temperatures struggle to reach freezing, and feeding the wood stove is a round-the-clock chore, time spent outside is short and to-the-point. Leisurely garden strolls? They truly are of the question some days. Still, I find ways to appreciate the beauty of nature, even from indoors. Trees and shrubs planted near the house —especially those just beyond the windows and doors— catch glistening snow, ice and sunlight, and playfully dance against the wall as shadows.  And if all else fails? Well, there’s always the magic of Jack Frost to help us through the winter…

Halesia tetraptera Through Jack Frost’s Newly Embroidered, Lace Curtain

 

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Welcome Back, Purple Finch

February 15th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus), Lights Upon Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius) 

The Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus, pictured above), with its raspberry-stained plumage and sweet, warbling song, is an occasional guest at my bird feeders during the winter months. With color scarce at this time of year, I am grateful for the brilliant-colored beauty and musical backdrop provided by this lovely, native bird.

The plummy-red hued, male Purple Finches are easy to spot at feeders and if you are hoping to attract them, it’s helpful to know that they are especially fond of black oil sunflower seeds! The female Purple Finch is mostly brown and white, with a streaky underbelly and white brow. In winter, small flocks also visit my flower beds, feasting upon seeds from perennial plants and ornamental grasses. In the landscape beyond, I sometimes spot them in the lower meadow, where they hunker down to feed within weedy wildflower remnants (learn more about this beautiful species at Cornell Lab of Ornithology, here).

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Cold Hands, Warm Heart

February 14th, 2018 § 2 comments § permalink


H A P P Y     V A L E N T I N E S     D A Y

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Article copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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The Vintage Rose: A Valentine’s Cocktail

February 11th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

The Vintage Rose Cocktail: Perfect for Valentine’s Day (or any day!)

Valentine’s Day is coming up, and with Rosalind Creasy’s The Edible Flower Garden still on my mind, how could I resist sharing a romantic rose-cocktail made with real rose petals and homemade rose syrup? Long time readers may recall this recipe from nearly a decade ago, when The Gardener’s Eden was just getting started. Time to revive a long-standing favorite in the name of love and flowers!

Although it’s easier to locate fresh, organic rose petals in June, many florists now offer organically grown flowers year round. Request imperfect roses —or bags of fresh, organic rose petals— since you will be dismantling them. Be sure to ask for organic roses, making certain that no pesticides have been sprayed on your blossoms. Remember, you will be making syrup and sipping wine soaked in these petals! I make my own rose syrup for this recipe (best made 24 hours ahead, to steep). Some recipes simply use water, sugar and rose petals, however, I like to add food grade rose water and sprigs of French lavender, plus a few drops of organic red food coloring for a pretty pink hue.

Vintage Rose Cocktail

Adapted from The Bubbly Girl, Maria Hunt

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Ingredients (makes one cocktail):

¾ oz      Rose syrup (see recipe below)

5 oz      Chilled, brut prosecco, cava or champagne

Twist     Meyer lemon

6           Organic rose petals

Method:

Add the rose syrup* to a chilled champagne flute. Top with sparkling wine or champagne. Twist the lemon peel over the glass to release the oils and then drop it into the flute. Garnish with fresh, organic rose petals.

Cheers !

*You can buy rose syrup at many specialty stores, however we made our own:

Rose Syrup

(Adapted from versions by Bubbly Girl, Maria Hunt & Rosalind Creasy)

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Ingredients:

2      Cups Organic Rose Petals (Rugosa, English and Heirloom Roses are best!)

1/2   Cup Water

1/2   Cup Rose Flower Water (or sub water if unavailable)

3       Sprigs French Lavender

2/3   Cup Granulated Sugar (use up to 1 cup of sugar for thicker syrup)

2       Drops Organic Red Food Coloring (optional)

Method:

Mix water and rose flower water (if using) in a medium saucepan and bring the mixture to a slow boil. Immediately add the sugar, stirring constantly. Once the sugar has melted, reduce the heat to a simmer. Slowly stir in the rose petals and lavender. Stir for a few minutes to thicken. Remove saucepan from heat and allow to cool. You may add a couple of drops of organic red food coloring at this point, if you so desire.

Pour the syrup mixture into a bowl with a tight fitting lid and allow to steep and cool overnight in the refrigerator. Remove lavender sprigs and seal the rose syrup in a small bottle. The syrup will keep fresh in the refrigerator for approximately 2 weeks. Freeze rose syrup for longer storage. Rose syrup can be used in many recipes —including cocktails, desserts and even main course entrees— so it’s very worth keeping some on hand, with your emergency stash of ice cream!

Heirloom & English Rose Petals are Especially Large and Fragrant 

Heirloom & English Roses from my Summertime Garden

Article copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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Designing Spring’s Prettiest Potager & Rosalind Creasy’s ‘Edible Flower Garden’

February 8th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Rosalind Creasy’s The Edible Flower Garden

When you begin plotting out your spring vegetable garden, do you include space for edible flowers in your planting plan? Wait, did I just say edible flowers? Indeed I did. Gourmet gardeners will already be familiar with the delicious flavor of stuffed squash blossoms and the zing of spicy nasturtiums, but there are many, many more flavorful flowers to consider when drawing up your potager design. Looking for fresh inspiration while designing a long-time client’s 2018 vegetable plot, I pulled out Rosalind Creasy’s The Edible Flower Garden and found myself dreaming of candied flowers, lavender ice cream, rose petal syrup and beds filled with Johnny Jump-Ups, Violets, Begonias, Calendula and Hyssop. What great wintertime reading for a gardener, and a perfect Valentine’s Day gift for your favorite flower lover.Image: Rosalind Creasy’s The Edible Flower Garden

Long time followers of this blog will recall many posts on potager design and edible gardens; including those featuring the use of herbs and flowers. The addition of flowers —especially edible buds and blossoms— to a vegetable garden is beneficial in so many ways. Not only do colorful flowers make an edible landscape more beautiful, they also provide sustenance to pollinators, beneficial insects, birds and yes, even the gardeners themselves. Designing a pretty potager is not only desirable, it also makes good gardening sense!Nasturtium Tangle in My Own, Summertime Potager

When it comes to selecting seed for your spring planting, The Edible Flower Garden is filled with great information about flower flavors and textures as well as advice on how to grow and prepare your blossoms. From easy-to-cultivate annuals to long-lived perennials and investment shrubs, The Edible Flower Garden will help you decide what to grow.Most Tuberous Begonias have a crisp texture and pleasantly light, lemony flavor. Image: Rosalind Creasy, The Edible Flower Garden

One of the best parts of this book, as well as others in Rosalind Creasy’s edible gardening series, is the recipe section. From simple sauces and salads to delicious-looking main courses and desserts, there’s something for everyone. Spring dreaming? May visions of Edible Flower Canapés and Rose Petal Sorbet dance in your head ’til springtime. Gather your seed packets and tubers, I’ll meet you in the garden come May!

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A copy of this book was provided by Tuttle Publishing in exchange for independent, un-biased review. No other compensation was received. The Gardener’s Eden is not an affiliate of Tuttle Publishing, but is an affiliate of Amazon.com.

Article copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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A Winter Wander

February 7th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

A bit of golden sunlight through the trees. Traces of warmth in this cold, dark season.

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Photography copyright Michaela Harlow at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. At no additional cost to you, a small commission will be paid The Gardener’s Eden, to help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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Spicy & Savory Winter Squash Stew

February 5th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Winter Squash Stew from The Edible Herb Garden

After posting my recent review of Rosalind Creasy’s The Edible Herb Garden last week, I decided that I simply had to try one of the many tempting recipes at the back of the book. Cooking with fresh herbs and homegrown vegetables is a bit more challenging at this time of year; especially in cold climates like New England. But with a good supply of windowsill herbs, a root cellar and/or freezer, attempting a few of Rosalind’s recipes is certainly not out of the question —even in midwinter. Onions and garlic are items most gardening cooks have on hand throughout the cold season, and butternut squash stores well right through the early days of spring. Of course, I always have homegrown herbs, even if they are just little, potted plants on my countertop. Who could live without fresh herbs?

Many of the recipes in Rosalind’s wonderful Edible Herb Gardening book sound both tasty and simple to make, however it was the hearty, native squash stew that leapt out at me on this raw, Superbowl Sunday weekend. Butternut squash has always been one of my favorite vegetables, but I often find it underrepresented in cookbooks. For this reason, I’m always looking out for creative ways to use this mildly sweet, hearty vegetable.

The Edible Herb Garden by Rosalind Creasy

The basic recipe included in the book is delightful, however on my second batch, I chose to jazz it up a bit with homemade vegetable stock, a few smoky chipotle chiles and ample hot sauce. Spicing is always personal, but otherwise I recommend following Rosalind’s cue.  Served with crispy corn chips, this thick and satisfying soup is as perfect for Meatless Monday as it was for Superbowl Sunday. I’m looking forward to trying many more of Rosalind’s recipes; including her Fancy Carrot and Onion Soup from this wonderful book, next weekend.

 

Winter Squash Stew

(Adapted from Rosalind Creasy’s Native Squash Stew, The Edible Herb Garden. Posted with Permission)

Ingredients:

3      Tbs  Olive Oil

2      Medium-Large Onions, Chopped

10    Cups Butternut Squash, Peeled & Cut into 2″ Cubes

4      Garlic Cloves, Finely Chopped

2      Red Bell Peppers, Roasted, Peeled & Chopped

6      Anaheim Chiles, Roasted, Peeled & Chopped (or equivalent canned, roasted, mild chiles)

3      Chipotle Chiles, Chopped (canned, in adobo sauce)

1      10-12 oz Package Frozen Corn (in season, use 2-3 ears of fresh corn, scraped)

3      Tsp Ground Cumin

3      Cups Vegetable Stock (or sub Chicken Stock for meat eaters)

1      Tbs Hot Chili Sauce (or to taste)

Salt & Ground Black Pepper to Taste

4      Tbs. Freshly Chopped Cilantro (plus more for serving)

Corn Chips or Corn Tortillas for Serving

 

Method:

Heat the oil in a large stockpot set to medium heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent. Add butternut squash, garlic, peppers, chilies, corn, cumin. Pour in 3 cups of stock and simmer on low heat until squash is tender (approximately 45 minutes). Mash the stew slightly with a potato masher to break apart some squash chunks and thicken the stew. Add salt, pepper and hot chili sauce to taste. Sprinkle pot and individual bowls of stew with cilantro and serve with a side of warm, homemade corn tortillas or chips.

Winter Squash Stew, Perfect for Lunch or Dinner on a Cold, New England Day

 

A copy of The Edible Herb Garden was provided by Tuttle Publishing in exchange for independent, un-biased review. No other compensation was received. The Gardener’s Eden is not an affiliate of Tuttle Publishing, but is an affiliate of Amazon.com.

Article copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

Plow & Hearth

Gardener's Supply Company

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Spring Planning with Rosalind Creasy’s ‘The Edible Herb Garden’

January 28th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

The Edible Herb Garden, Rosalind Creasy

It’s late January. The ground is frozen, the hills are grey-brown and the garden is covered in ice. Convincing clients that now is the best time to create a landscape design for spring planting has never been easy. But it’s smart to begin now —when the snow is piled high and you’ve no garden centers to visit/distract you— with inspirational books, graph paper and tape measure in hand. Come May, you’ll be ready to snap up those seeds and six packs when the greenhouses swing open their doors.

Dreaming of a beautiful herb garden to replace that dry patch of front lawn? Or maybe you want to create an herb knot for the center of your potager? Thinking of something more formal this year, but not sure of just where to begin with your design? I’d suggest heading to your local library, bookseller, or online equivalent, to grab yourself a copy of Rosalind Creasy’s The Edible Herb Garden.

There are two types of books every gardener should have in their library: the how-to garden book and the how-to landscape design book. The Edible Herb Garden rests squarely on the latter book shelf, but also contains a bit of practical, hands-on gardening advice. If you have some growing experience, but need help in the layout and design department, and perhaps a few herb garden maintenance reminders, this is the book for you. And, if you are a gardening cook, this title rewards your hard work with some wonderful, summertime recipes and tips for preserving herbs in a variety of ways.

Rosalind Creasy’s Beautiful Garden Design Sketches will Inspire Your Plan

Flavored Vodkas from Rosalind Creasy’s The Edible Herb Garden

I’m designing a new vegetable/herb garden for a client this winter and plan to write more about potager gardens and layout in the coming weeks. Rosalind Creasy’s books on the subject of edible gardening are great inspiration. And, who wouldn’t want to conjure up a bit of summertime color, scent and flavor on these long, dark, wintry days?

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A copy of this book was provided by Tuttle Publishing in exchange for independent, un-biased review. No other compensation was received. The Gardener’s Eden is not an affiliate of Tuttle Publishing, but is an affiliate of Amazon.com.

Article copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden, and will help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

Plow & Hearth

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A New Year’s Wish

January 2nd, 2018 § 2 comments § permalink

Welcome 2018

Wishing you joy & happiness in the New Year!

Frosty Morning

Article & Photography copyright Michaela Harlow at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. At no additional cost to you, a small commission will be paid The Gardener’s Eden, to help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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Solstice Season in the Secret Garden

December 11th, 2017 § 2 comments § permalink

Solstice Season in the Secret Garden

 First snow. Powder swirls about the Secret Garden, dusting peaks, tracing lines and filling every crevice. The forest, enchanted, drifts softly off to sleep . . .

Winter bares her beautiful bones

Article & Photography copyright Michaela Harlow at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. At no additional cost to you, a small commission will be paid The Gardener’s Eden, to help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

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Calamondin Orange: Sunshine in a Pot

December 9th, 2017 § 3 comments § permalink

Calamondin Orange Tree in the Kitchen

As we move closer to the shortest day of the year, and the long, dark nights of winter, sunlight begins to feel like a rare and precious commodity. During the cold, colorless months, I find myself seeking out warm hues —bright yellow, orange, lime green— and all things tropical. Something tells me I’m not the only northern gardener dreaming of a far-away paradise.

Last year, my sister and my nephew surprised me with a beautiful Calamondin Orange tree (Citrofortunella mitis), for my birthday. With its glossy-green foliage and abundant, golden fruit, this tree is a total knock-out. But the real surprise? Insect and disease resistance. Not a single battle has been waged with scale or spider mites. Of the three citrus trees growing in my home —which include an Improved Meyer Lemon and a Lime Tree— the Calamondin Orange has proven easiest and most productive, by far.

Calamondin Orange Tree in the Kitchen Today, with River Stone Mulch

If you’re new to growing citrus trees as houseplants, I highly recommend starting with an indoor-tolerant Calamondin Orange. And if you happen to be looking for the perfect gift for the gardening gourmet in your life, this tree could be it!

Small but abundant, bright-orange fruits appear at regular intervals on this cross between a Kumquat and Mandarin Orange. Calamondin oranges are quite tart and a good substitute for Persian limes in most recipes. Their tangy juice and sweet zest is delicious in many drinks, desserts, savory dishes and condiments; including salad dressings, marmalades, salsas, chutneys and pickled preserves. I love adding tart Calamondin juice to cocktails and spicing up a simple crème brulée with a bit of the sweet & tangy zest. Imagine the creative, culinary possibilities!

Freshly Harvested Calamondin Oranges

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Tips for Selection & Care of Indoor Citrus Trees

Selecting: Ready to begin growing your own crop of tiny, golden oranges? Choose a two to three-year-old specimen from a reputable nursery for the earliest showing of blossoms and fruit. Look for healthy, green foliage and a well-pruned, full framework. Avoid trees with spindly growth, curled or yellowing foliage, and suckers at the base. Online, you can find beautiful Calamondin Orange Trees at White Flower Farm and Four Winds Growers.

Potting: When potting your newly acquired citrus tree, choose a ceramic, clay or plastic pot with adequate drainage. Ensure that the selected container has several holes at the bottom, and fill the drainage dish with gravel or stone to allow good moisture release and airflow. Well-drained soil is also critical. Buy pre-mixed potting soil specifically blended for citrus, or choose a slightly acidic, loamy potting mix with a pH of 6-7.

Placement: Citrus trees need 8-12 hours of sunlight per day. During the fall and winter months, place your Calamondin in a draft-free, south-facing window with even temperatures (55-85°F is ideal). Avoid locating the tree where temperatures fluctuate radically: such as near wood stoves, ovens, radiators or exterior doors. Calamondin Orange Trees may be moved outside in late spring (after the last frost date in your area). Be sure to slowly acclimate your tree to outdoor conditions by placing it in a protected spot. Try to find a dappled nook, shielded from high wind. After a couple of weeks have passed, the pot can migrate to its summer home in full sun.

Watering: Water your tree regularly (using a meter helps tremendously), and cover the soil with decorative river stone, moss or other mulch mulch to help reduce evaporation and temperature fluctuation at the root zone. Soil should be kept on the drier side during winter months to avoid root rot and fungal infections. Like most tropical beauties, Calamondins enjoy humidifiers and/or regular misting as well.

Feeding: Citrus are heavy feeders. Fertilize your tree every three weeks using a citrus-specific fertilizer, like this one from Jobe’s Organics, throughout the spring and summer months. During the fall and winter months, fertilize once every six weeks.

Harvesting Calamondin Oranges from My Tree

Harvesting: Calamondin oranges take about one year to ripen from the time blossoms appear. However, because the tree will produce flowers and fruit at the same time, harvests can happen over a period of weeks or months. Snip bright orange fruit from branches with sharp pruners (I use Felco 8s) to avoid tearing the tender skin. You’ll know the oranges are ripe when they are just soft enough to give slightly under the pressure of your fingertips.

Pest Management: Calamondins do seem to resist insects and disease, however all houseplants are vulnerable to infestations and stress increases the risk, so be sure to meet your tree’s needs as listed above. Sometimes, despite our best efforts, tiny insect pests hitch a ride on newly acquired plants or on fresh produce and flowers from the grocery store. Insects will also set up camp while potted plants are living outside during the summer months. Once the trees come inside, away from predatory insects —boom— bug explosion. Should your citrus tree become host to spider mites, scale, mealy bugs or aphids, try treating organically with insecticidal soap and horticultural oil, or neem oil for tougher pests like spider mites and scale. The key to success is repeated treatment at regularly scheduled intervals (see manufacturer’s recommendation by pest), until the infestation is under control.

With proper attention and care, a Calamondin Orange Tree will provide many golden harvests of fruit and years of beauty, inside and out.


Article & Photography copyright Michaela Harlow at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through the affiliate-links here. A small percentage of each sale, at no additional cost to you, will be paid to The Gardener’s Eden to help with site maintenance and web hosting costs. Thank you!

Plow & Hearth

Gardener's Supply Company

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