Cooling Off in the Dappled Shade: Deepest Violet and Shadow Blue Hues …

July 23rd, 2011 § Comments Off on Cooling Off in the Dappled Shade: Deepest Violet and Shadow Blue Hues … § permalink

Cotinus coggygria ‘Royal Purple’ with Fothergilla x intermedia ‘Blue Shadow’

Out working in the field during this week’s scorching heat and high humidity, I found myself dodging the sun whenever possible; ducking beneath the cover of every shade tree and arbor in order to hide from burning, mid-day rays. Over the past couple of weeks it’s been so hot, it really does feel as if you could fry an egg on the side walk. I can barely keep up with watering these days, and I find myself longing for the sweet relief of summer rain.

During the dog days of summer —seduced by the undeniable allure of cool hues and dappled shade in the Secret Garden— I like to spend as much time as possible working from my shadowy office-nook. Cool shades like sea-green, violet-maroon, silvery-blue and burgundy —some of my favorite colors— fill this shady oasis. And on hot days, I love to pull a chair into the tall ferns and surround myself with lush, sensual foliage, in soothing, deep, dark hues. Previously, in posts such as “A Heart of Darkness”, I’ve mentioned my infatuation with nearly-black plants. And while the hues are anything but hot, my dark passion for shadowy foliage shows now sign of cooling. Currently, I’m loving the color play of silver-blue leaves against deep maroon, and two long-time favorite, shady ladies, Fothergilla x intermedia ‘Blue Shadow’ (USDA 4-8) and Cotinus coggygria ‘Royal Purple’ (USDA 4-8), are the latest, cool-hued additions to my garden (foliage of both pictured above). 

Athyrium niponicum var. pictum with Cryptotaenia japonica atropurpurea (aka variously: Japanese Mitsuba or Japanese parsley/honewort)

The pale pink plumes of Astilbe x arendesii ‘Europa’ also combine well with bronzy-maroon Cryptotaenia japonica atropurpurea

Elsewhere in the shade gardens, I like to combine astilbe and silvery ferns —particularly Athyrium niponicum var. pictum and Athyrium ‘Ghost’ (both ferns, USDA 4-9)— with the deep, violet-maroon leaves of Cryptotaenia japonica autropurpurea(aka Japanese Mitsuba/Honewort, USDA zones 4-9*), Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’, H. ‘Stormy Sea’ and statuesque Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ (which I featured in this post –click here– last summer). Chartreuse/gold leaves and blades also play beautifully in contrast with darker foliage; bringing a bit of light to shady vignettes. Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’ and Hosta ‘August Moon’ are two favorite bright-contrast plants in my dimly-lit Secret Garden.

After a long day in the hot sun, there’s nothing quite so soothing as a cool glass of lemonade in a lush, shady nook…

Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ (aka Cimicifuga), Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’ play beautifully with the chartreuse-blades of Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’ and to the far left, silvery, variegated Lamium maculatum ‘White Nancy’

Hosta ‘August Moon’ with Cryptotaenia japonica atropurpurea

One of my long-time favorite, leafy ground covers for dappled sunlight, Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’, combines well with many other shade garden plants. And I particularly love the leathery-maroon leaves beneath Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’

*Cryptotaenia japonica atropurpurea is a culinary herb, known variously as Mitsuba, Japanese parsley or honeywort. It is closely related to North American Cryptotaenia canadensis. Although it is not considered an invasive plant by the USDA, C. japonica freely seeds and in shady, moist locations can become aggressive (much like mint). Plant this herb with caution and dead head to prevent self-sowing seed troubles.

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, articles and content on this site, (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

Do you enjoy The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through affiliate links. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to this site, helping to cover web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you so much for your support!

shopterrain.com

Sephora.com, Inc.

Gardener's Supply Company

The Gothic Gourmet: Black Beauties and Dark Delights of the Potager…

February 21st, 2010 § 4 comments § permalink

Pasilla Bajio (the little raisin) – from White Flower Farm

Imagine gleaming, glossy, black peppers, shiny as patent leather shoes. Picture dark red, tell-tale-heart tomatoes and ebony eggplant polished to a satiny patina. Now visualize amethyst hued basil, purple kohlrabi and blue-black cabbage. Intrigued? Welcome to the slightly sinister, and delightfully decadent world of gothic-gourmet gardening. Designing a beautiful and productive potager can take many twists and turns, sometimes leading to shadows in the light of day. And who lurks about this Edward Gorey – inspired vegetable plot? Why black ravens and spiders and warty-toads – oh my. Imagine delicious, black-fruiting tomatoes; vines twisting and twining about a spindly trellis straight from the imagination of Tim Burton. Or how about  a plot of violet hued gourmet potatoes, guarded by a group of cackling black crows? Terrifyingly tempting, wouldn’t you agree? I see my vegetable garden growing into the shadows this year – with strange metal flowers, freakish pots, eerie Victorian bat houses, and fantastical feeders for my feathered friends. Who ever said a garden plot had to be straight-laced and boring? Morticia Addams had other ideas, and so do I…

Yes, it’s quite the eccentric picture – I admit it – but a tasty one too. Richly colored vegetables are all the rage with savvy chefs right now, and there’s a good reason! The produce harvested from dark fruiting plants, such as black peppers and eggplant, lies at the tasty base of some of the most exquisite culinary creations. And the best part of growing these black gems yourself? Gourmet vegetables like ‘All Blue’ potatoes and black ‘Pierce’s Pride’ heirloom tomatoes cost an arm-and-a-leg at the market, but the frugal gardener can produce exotic dinners with dark homegrown veggies for a fraction of the price.

So, even if you aren’t inclined to bring Edward Scissorhands decor into your backyard garden, adding a few black beauties to your potager will certainly add some rich flavor to your dinner plate. Gothic vegetable gardening is a horse of a different color – why not join me for a ride? Take a peek at a few of the magical things dancing through my dark, garden-designing mind…

Crow Garden Sculpture by artist Virginia Wyoming

Victorian Lace Plate by artist Virginia Wyoming

Rust Wire Edging from Terrain

Amethyst Basil – Johnny’s Seeds

Orient Express Eggplant from Johnny’s Seeds

The Tell-Tale Heart? Beautiful ‘Pierce’s Pride’, Black-Red Heirloom Tomato from White Flower Farm

Strangely Beautiful –  Copper Oriole Feeder from Duncraft

Nevermore © 2009 Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

Shadowy Silhouettes – Bird Fruit Feeders from Duncraft

Purple Ornamental Peppers in the Potager at Ferncliff

Red Rubin Basil from Johnny’s Seeds

‘Black Pearl’ Ornamental Pepper – Johnny’s Seeds

Green Flower Pot from Terrain

Gothic Garden Beauty – Metal Mum from Terrain

Urn Planter from White Flower Farm

Toad Stool Garden Ornament from Terrain

‘Kolibri’ kohlrabi from Johnny’s Seeds

Victorian Bat House from Duncraft

Bat Guano Fertilizer from Down To Earth

Bat Cottage from Duncraft

‘Purple Beauty’ Pepper from White Flower Farm

Mustard Greens from Johnny’s Seeds

Royal Burgundy Round Bush Beans from Johnny’s Seeds

Rusted Iron Allium Stem from Terrain

Toad House from Duncraft

Metal Agapanthus Stem from Terrain

 

Bull’s Blood Beets from Johnny’s Seeds

‘Sweet Chocolate’ Peppers from Johnny’s Seeds

‘Black Plum’ Heirloom Tomatoes from White Flower Farm

Rust Obelisk from Terrain

‘Holy Moly Peppers’ from White Flower Farm

Bone Meal Fertilizer from Down To Earth

 

‘Black from Tula’ Heirloom Tomatoes from White Flower Farm

‘All Blue’ Gourmet Potatoes from White Flower Farm

Wire Basket from Terrain

Blood Meal Fertilizer from Down To Earth

Rosenblum decorative pot from Terrain

The Gothic Potager in Winter – Dark Cabbage in Ice at Ferncliff

Dark Gardening Inspiration from my gothic library collection: Edward Gorey’s “Evil Garden” and “Gilded Bat”……  Amphigorey Too (Perigee) – Edward Gorey

And the shadowy muse-conjuring tales of Amy Stewart’s – Wicked Plants

Copper Bean Trellis Encased in Ice – Ferncliff Potager in Winter

Johnny Depp as Edward Scissorhands, image © 20th Century Fox

Carolyn Jones as Morticia Addams,The Original Addams Family, image © ABC

***

Article and Photographs, (with noted exceptions: linked object photos via Terrain, White Flower Farm and Johnny’s Seeds, Lace plate photo: Virginia Wyoming), copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All content on this site is copyright The Gardener’s Eden. All Rights Reserved. Link love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

Thank you for your support !

shopterrain.com

***

 

 

 

 

A Heart of Darkness…

February 12th, 2010 § 5 comments § permalink

Dahlia ‘Karma Choc’, available online at, (and image via):  White Flower Farm

Some gardeners adore bright colors, and other plant collectors crave pastels. There are those who prefer dramatic plants painted silver and gold and a few indecisive types who seek out green tonal shifts and mottled white variegation. These hues are all quite lovely, and they occasionally catch my eye, but I fully admit that I have more shadowy desires. The truth is that deep within me, hidden from the light of day, beats a heart of pure darkness – I confess that I have a passion for black plants. Rich, dark purple and velvety red; bitter chocolate and silky maroon; ruby wine and exotic ebony: these are the colors I covet. And wouldn’t you agree that on a hot summer day, it’s easy to be seduced by a mysterious garden filled with shadows?

Cryptotaenia japonica atropurpurea backs up Athyrium niponicum var. pictum in my Secret Garden…

I love the cool, quiet of my shady, Secret Garden – but even in full sun, I like to paint shadows with dark foliage and black plants. While stunning on their own, when used in artful combination, these raven-hued beauties of the plant world can make the other flowers and foliage in a garden truly sing. Beside maroon and deep purple, sky blue blossoms sparkle, and when paired with orange and yellow, wine toned foliage is a bold and dramatic choice. Variegated plants, as well as the dusty, marbled whites and soft silver tones, all appear more striking when positioned beside darker colors. Imagine ghostly white ferns floating in a sea of dark foliage, or icy silver-tipped ivy winding about the base of black snake root, (Cimicifugia/Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ or ‘Brunette’). Dark beauty shyly beckons in the shade…

Streptocarpus ‘Black Panther’, seduces from the shadows of my garden on a hot day..

As for the dark blossoms – oh my, but how I’ve fallen; hopelessly deep, and madly in love, with all of their seductive charms. Ruby red, tipping toward blackness, the deep colored dahlias delight me, and the ink-stained petals of iris can drive me truly wild. But pair the velvety allure of maroon roses with a subtle, spicy fragrance, and I will begin to truly swoon. Yes, I know it is an obsession – but you must know my passion for plants by now. I simply can not help it. In fact , as some of you may recall, I have revealed my personal weakness for dark flowers, when I wrote about the mysterious Black Panther Streptocarpus last summer, (pictured above). So, come along with me, won’t you ? Let’s wander away on a tour of the dark-blossoming underworld. Others may only be charmed by bold birds-of-paradise or delicate little, fluttering flowers. As for me, I will always prefer the slightly sinister beauties, like the dark temptress Odile, a shadow drifting silently across Swan Lake

Ipomoea ‘Sweet Heart Purple’,(image via): White Flower Farm

Aquilegia ‘Black Barlow’, available online at, (and image via):White Flower Farm

Colocasia esculenta ‘Black magic’, (image/avail. via): White Flower Farm

Heuchera ‘Obsidian’, available online at, (and image via): White Flower Farm

Angelica gigas, available online at, (and image via): White Flower Farm

Sambucus ‘Black Lace’, available online at, (and image via): White Flower Farm

Ricinus communis ‘Carmencita bright red’, available online at, (and image via): White Flower Farm

Begonia Rex ‘Fireworks’, available online at, (and image via): White Flower Farm

Ipomoea batatas ‘Blackie’, available online at (and photo via): White Flower Farm

Iris chrysographes, available online at (and image via): Wayside Gardens

Ophiopogon ‘Nigrescens’ (Black Mondo Grass), available online at: (and image via) Wayside Gardens

***

Odile, the black swan, as portrayed by Julie Kent. Photo by Roy Rounds via Thought Patterns.

For further exploring the shadowy side of your gardening personality, I recommend both of these dark, delicious titles…

Karen Platt’s Black Magic and Purple Passion

Paul Bonine’s Black Plants

***

Article and photographs (except where noted and linked to external websites and products) are copyright 2010 Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved.

All content on this site is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without express written consent.

shopterrain.com

***

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with Black Plants at The Gardener's Eden.