Snow, Fog & Ice: Quiet Garden Beauty On a Winter’s Day …

January 13th, 2012 § 4 comments § permalink

The Garden, Cloaked in Ice-Cappeded Snow (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’)

Awoke this morning to find Winter —after a long and inexplicable absence— has finally returned; cloaking the garden in shades of alabaster and cream. Vibrant shades of red and gold punctuate the stark landscape; jewel-like accessories on Winter’s cool, icy ensemble. Driving conditions are treacherous in the hills today, but who would want to depart with such beauty to admire?

Winter’s Vibrant Red and Gold (Viburnum setigerum berries backed up by the blond blades of Miscanthus sinensis)

Icy Branches Dance in a Wild Swirl of Flurries (Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’)

Secret Garden Entry on a Winter’s Day (Foreground: Daphne x burkwoodii ‘Carol Mackie’ & Acer palmatum x dissectum ‘Seiryu’)

Frozen Remnants of Japanese Forest Grass (Hakonechloa macra ‘Nicolas’)

Secret Garden Entry Border in Winter (Ilex verticillata ‘Red Sprite’ & Juniperus chinensis ‘Sargentii’)

Frozen Strands of Honey-Colored Beauty (Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Gold Mop’)

Tartarian Dogwood Lights Up the Forest Like Flames in the Ice and Fog (Cornus alba ‘Siberica’) 

Delicate, Crystal-Coated Switch Grass (Panicum virgatum ‘Heavy Metal’ in foreground & Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’ in back)

Like Crystal-Crusted Rubies: Cotoneaster Berries in Snow (Cotoneaster dammeri ‘Eichholz’)

Fading Flame Grass and Weigela’s Brown, Twiggy Bones (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Purpurascens’, Weigela florida ‘Red Prince’)

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photos, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions) are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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A Misty Morning Stroll Through the Moody, Late Autumn Garden …

November 11th, 2011 § 8 comments § permalink

Still Shining Brightly After the Unseasonable Snow Storm: Abelia mosanensis and Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’ with a Carpet of Juniper in the Entry Garden

Resilience. Sometimes I am astonished by nature’s ability to bounce back after trauma. In spite of a historic, tropical storm in August and record-breaking two feet of snow in October, the garden is doing remarkably well and is on the re-bound. I’m happy to report there was little damage to the vast majority of woody plants, and even the ornamental grasses are perking back up. My Stewartia pseudocamellia did suffer a nasty break on a particularly poetic lower branch and sadly, it’s throwing off the artful asymmetry. I did a quick pruning job to clean up the wound, but I will have to make a few tough decisions —including whether or not to keep or replace this tree— come spring.

And so a quick tour of the misty, November garden highlights; a bit less vibrant this year, perhaps, but seductive and enchanting nonetheless …

The Young Blackhaw Viburnum Still Holds Colorful Foliage and Fruit (Viburnum prunifolium)

Thanks to a Night of Gentle Shaking Throughout the Snow Storm, Not a Hair Was Harmed on Her Glorious Crown: The Blue Green Dragon (Acer palmatum x dissectum ‘Seiryu’) Continues to Blaze in Full Color at the Secret Garden Door

The Coral Stems of the Nannyberry Viburnum (V. lentago) Look Even More Fantastical When Laced With Dewy Cobwebs

I’m Not Sure of How the Bluestar Amsonia (Amsonia hubrichtii) and Oakleaf Hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia) Survived Two Feet of Heavy Snow, but I’m Oh-So Pleased They Both Did!

Blooming Past the Snow: Native Aster (Symphyotrichum oblongifolium) ‘Raydon’s Favorite’

Through Snow, Sleet and Rain: This Border of Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens, Fothergilla major ‘Mt. Airy’, Juniperus x pfitzeriana ‘Sea Green’ and Cornus alba ‘Siberica’ Still Glows Bright as Hot Coals

Cotoneaster  dammeri ‘Eichholz’and Juniperus Horizontalis 

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photos, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions) are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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The Subtle Hues of November’s Garden Play Softly in Low Light & Gentle Mist…

November 23rd, 2010 § 5 comments § permalink

The Remaining Fruit on this Tea Viburnum Gleams Like Candy Store Gumdrops (Viburnum setigerum) Against a Background of Honey-Colored Miscanthus

Surprised by a late November warm spell —gardens enveloped by quiet rain and soft fog— I found myself shrugging a few responsibilities and wandering around in the late afternoon light. Everywhere, tiny droplets of rain —caught between cobwebs and berry-laden branches—sparkled like a million loose diamonds. The last colors of autumn are slowly fading now —shifting toward subtler, wintery hues— and on misty days like today, the conifers —particularly blue-green junipers— look fresh and lovely beside damped stone walls, candy-colored fruits and bleached meadow grasses.

On busy days filled with life’s chaos —places to go and things to do— the gentle calm of nature whispers and soothes a busy mind. The garden is my sanctuary. So, before the holiday whirlwind sweeps you up and carries you away, take a walk with me… Breathe in the scent of the damp earth and listen to the sound of falling rain…

Holger’s Singleseed Juniper (Juniperus squamata ‘Holger’) Atop the Secret Garden Stairs

Viburnum setigerum: Berries with Rain Drops

Sprinkled in Sparkling Raindrops at the Edge of the Meadow: Deschampsia flexuosa (Tufted Hair Grass), Cotoneaster and Juniperus squamata ‘Holger’

Juniperus squamata ‘Holger’ (Holger’s Singleseed Juniper) Atop the Secret Garden Steps on a Foggy November Morning at Ferncliff

Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’ in the Late November Entry Garden at Ferncliff

Climbing Hydrangea Consumes a Lichen-Splotched Boulder at the Edge of the Garden (Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris)

Flower-Remnants in Fog – Climbing Hydrangea (H. anomala subsp. petiolaris)

At Meadow’s Edge, Bleaching Flame Grass Continues to Add Texture and Warmth to the Landscape (Miscanthus purpurascens)

Rhus typhina, our Native Staghorn Sumac (read more about this beauty by clicking back, here)

The Texture and Color of Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’) Adds Subtle Beauty to the Late Autumn and Winter Landscape

Thousands of Raindrops Add Dazzling Sparkle to the Colorful November Foliage of Daphne x burkwoodii ‘Carol Mackie’

Juniperus horizontalis Spills Over the Entryway Retaining Wall

Raindrops Collect on Cobwebs Lining the Cotoneaster (C. dammeri ‘Eichholz’) Spilling Over the Stone Retaining Wall

The Vertical, White Lines of Paper Birch Stand Stark Along the Toffee-Toned Hillside

The Rich, Caramel-Gold Color of  Miscanthus sinensis ‘Strictus’ is a Welcoming Sight on a Foggy Day

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Article and photographs ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

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Oh, Tutti Frutti: It’s Candy Land Time! Magical & Colorful Ornamental Berries…

September 24th, 2010 § Comments Off on Oh, Tutti Frutti: It’s Candy Land Time! Magical & Colorful Ornamental Berries… § permalink

Circus-like baubles on candy-coral stems, literally cover this (Viburnum lentago) nannyberry viburnum in my garden

Red twig dogwood berries (Cornus alba ‘Sibirica’) bring to mind mini marshmallow bits and and rainbow jimmies

Just like orange-flavored Tic-Tacs – The sight of these Chinese-orange berries on my tea viburnum (V. setigerum ) always gives me a little lift

Oh goody gum drops! Would you look at the garden? Why it’s a living Candy Land out there! Just like an old-fashioned sweet-shop —penny-jars filled with confections— my shrubs are overflowing with orange candy, red candy and purple candy galore. Yes, it’s that time of the year when the woody-plants at Ferncliff go all tutti frutti. And the birds? What a racket they make! If I had an avian translator on hand, I wonder what phrases I would hear?  “Jay, come over here and try some of this grape fizz candy”. “Wait a second Goldie… Get a load of the gob-stoppers this year”.  The autumn garden is a sweet feast for my eyes and, more important, for the bellies of my feathered friends.

With one variety of ornamental fruit ripening right after the other, this confectionary show will go on in the garden for months. September, October and November are always bird-berrilicious in the garden, and later on in winter —when ice and snow coat the remaining branches of fruit— my hilltop turns into a virtual Rock-Candy Mountain. After the heavy freezes in December and January, the crystal-covered red and orange berries sparkle just like sweets in glass jars…

Gummy Gobs – Viburnum trilobum, ‘J.N. Select Redwing’

Callicarpa dichotoma ‘Issai’ – grape fizz candy meets honey-wafer foliage. Read more about this favorite shrub and other autumn beauties here.

Viburnum carlesii – Looks Like Licorice Drops and Hot Balls

Some of my favorite spring blooming trees and shrubs —including Malus species, Prunus, Aronia arbutifolia (red chokeberry), the entire Viburnum genus (especially V. carlesii, V. lantana, V. nudum, V. plicatum, V. setigerum,V. trilobum) and others too numerous to list— are also prolific producers of colorful, bird-attracting ornamental fruit in late-summer, autumn and early winter. Hip-producing roses, such as R. rubrifolia (redleaf rose), R. rugosa, and R. virginiana, provide fruit for wildlife or for human-consumption (usually in the form of jelly or tea). And elderberries, some of which produce both spectacular year-round foliage, are also worth including in a gardens for their berries; both for birds and humans.

When considering berry-producing shrubs for the garden, keep in mind that some of the less-stellar spring bloomers —particularly Pyracantha (firethorn), Callicarpa (purple beautyberry), Ilex verticillata (winterberry holly), Cotoneaster, Cornus alba (red and yellowtwig dogwood), and Rhus— produce some of the most vibrant late-season fruit. (For more information about purple beautyberry — the Callicarpa pictured above— click back to this post here). Always research the cultural requirements of each genus and species carefully before planting, and remember that some shrubs —especially the hollies (Ilex)— will require that you plant both male and female specimens in order to produce fruit…

Juniper Berry – Blueberry Bombs

Cornus kousa… or ch,ch,ch, ch, ch,ch, ch,ch Cherry Bomb?

The berries of  my Variegated Wayfaring Viburnum (V. lantana) could be topping a mint-swirl sundae

Rosa rugosa hips (a relative of the apple) are not only beautiful, but add delightful flavor to tea and jelly, as well as providing food for wildlife

Mid to late autumn in a great time to plant trees and shrubs in the garden, and it’s also a fantastic season to grab great deals at your local garden center or favorite online nursery. Once temperatures cool, and the rainy season returns, dormant trees and shrubs will have time to settle into the garden; all ready  to get growing in spring. For information on planting shrubs in autumn, travel back to last year’s post on the subject by clicking here.

Although most of the berries pictured here are edible or harmless to humans, it goes without saying that you should always use common sense in the garden. If you have small, curious children, be sure to research what you are planting and avoid poisonous fruits. And teach children early —as you would teach them about tiny objects— that all we see should not go in our mouths! Never eat berries unless you are certain that they are fit for human consumption. Enjoy the autumn season, the birds visiting your garden, and all of fall’s beautiful ‘Candy Land’ delights…

Just like Cherries in the Snow! Ilex verticillata ‘Red Sprite’ – Rock candy for birds in January at Ferncliff

Cotoneaster dammeri ‘Eichholz’ – looks like cinnamon dots and red candy apple

Ilex verticillata ‘Red Sprite’

Viburnum nudum ‘Winterthur’ at Ferncliff

For more autumn color-inspiration, you may enjoy traveling back to last year’s series of three posts —The Autumn Brilliance Series— by clicking here.

Inspiration: Why, Willy Wonka {images Paramount Pictures/Tim Burton Productions credit as linked to films}…

The Runaways Cherry Bomb {image from linked soundtrack cover}…

And of course, the original Tutti Frutti himself, Little Richard {image from linked soundtrack}

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Article and Botanical Photographs ⓒ Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

{ All plant photos in this feature were taken at my private garden, Ferncliff }

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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The Dawn of Winter: December Notes from Ferncliff…

December 17th, 2009 § 3 comments § permalink

Winter Dawn

Winter’s Dawn at Ferncliff

The morning after a storm. Silent. Pristine. After months of drowsy, frost-covered mornings, at long last the garden has fallen to sleep. Lulled by a by a shifting blanket of snow, the flowers have all drifted away now; their pods empty; stalks broken. Summer’s song is hushed; notes frozen in chilly stillness. A long winter’s night lies ahead. Sleep tight Callicarpa. Stay warm beneath your mulch, toad lily. I’ve tucked you in with care – very tightly.  Soon the forest will howl and snap, ushering in Winter’s sharp, bitter cold…

Microbiota in snow storm

Russian cypress, (Microbiota decussata), lines the path to the north meadow…

Ilex verticillata in snow

Ilex verticillata, ‘Red sprite’ sparkles in the morning snow…

forest in snow storm

The native forest caught in a snow squall…

fountain grass and sedum in snow

Shadows play upon the snow and bleached remains of fountain grass…

chair and basket

Snow coats rusty patterns – sharp, steel slats and curved lines…

miscanthus sinensis close up in snow

Impossibly delicate, tiny snowflakes cling to tufts on ornamental grass…

miscanthus sinensis in snow storm

The hardy perennials remain standing, swaying in the snow…

entry garden, first snow

The entry garden plantings continue to add color and texture to the landscape, and in the background, eastern hemlock stands stately, newly cloaked in white…

echinacea, rudbeckia and miscanthus in winter

Garden remnants in light and shadow…

cotoneaster in snow

Cotoneaster, still holding plump, ripe fruit, cascades down the retaining wall…

Hydrangea paniculata lime light in snow

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Limelight’ rests in a bed of snow…

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Article and photographs copyright 2009, Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden. Please do not use my words or pictures without contacting me first. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardner’s Eden, and may not be used or reproduced without express written permission. Inspired by something you see here? Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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Walking in a Winter Wonderland …

December 1st, 2009 § 6 comments § permalink

ornamental grass, first snow

Sleigh bells ring… are you listening ?

“When it snows, ain’t it thrilling, though your nose gets a chilling? We’ll frolic and play the Eskimo way, walking in a winter wonderland”…

Welcome December !

Hellebores dusted with snow

Hellebores gleam and glimmer like stars in white glitter…

cotoneaster with snow

A branch of Cotoneaster, loaded with red berries, reminiscent of a ruby necklace, dusted with snow…

Beech stand, first snow...

The twinkling forest on a frosty morning…

Stone steps dusted in snow

The Secret Garden steps look as if someone carelessly ripped a bag of powdered sugar while sneaking sweets inside…

Ilex verticillata and Juniperus chinensis 'Sargentii' dusted in snow

Ilex verticillata ‘Red sprite’ and  Juniperus chinensis ‘Sargentii’ dusted with snow…

Juniperus horizontalis 'Wiltonii'

Juniperus horizontalis ‘Wiltonii’,(‘Blue Rug’), could pass for fine white lace…

Hydrangea paniculata 'Limelight'

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Limelight’, delicately powdered…

Heuchera seed with ice in November

Heuchera seed-pods with ice droplets, sparkle and gleam in morning light

Rodgersia dusted in snow

Rodgersia remnants strike a feminine pose beside the stone wall…

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“Winter Wonderland” melody by Dick Smith and Felix Bernard – 1934

Article and photographs copyright 2009, Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

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Thank you !

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Autumn Brilliance Part Three: Plant Partners for the Late Show and Early Winter Marquee…

October 23rd, 2009 § Comments Off on Autumn Brilliance Part Three: Plant Partners for the Late Show and Early Winter Marquee… § permalink

Acer palmatum x dissectum ‘Seiryu’ in late October

By late October, much of the foliage in the forest surrounding my garden has passed its peak. Although the woods are still basking in the glow of golden birch and poplar, lemony striped maple, rusty red oak and amber colored beech –  the vibrant orange and red maple leaves are now carpeting the woodland paths, where they rustle in the wind and crunch beneath my feet. Walks through the forest in late autumn are a fragrant affair; scented with musky dampness and memories. There is a beautiful sadness in the woods at this time of year – a melancholy enhanced by frequently-foggy mornings and low-lit afternoons…

Acer palmatum x dissectum ‘Seiryu’ foliage in late October

In my garden, most flowers vanished with the recent hard frost – but the ornamental fruit and foliage, stars of autumn’s late-show, are still going strong. Now through mid November, the leading role belongs to my favorite tree, Acer palmatum x dissectum ‘Seiryu’. This Japanese maple, commonly known as ‘The Blue-Green Dragon’, (currently the only upright dissected-leaf cultivar), is planted at the bottom edge of a slope near my studio where it arches over the Secret Garden door. The Blue-Green Dragon is prized for its lacy, delicately cut foliage and its late season color. A true chameleon, this dragon changes from sea-green to golden chartreuse before lighting a brilliant blaze of orange. Finally, in mid November, the dragon’s heat simmers down to a coppery hue as her leaves slowly drop to the hidden walkway below. Nearby, Daphne x burkwoodii, ‘Carol Mackie’, has begun her own transformation; morphing from variegated green and white to a citrusy blend of lemon yellow, sweet orange and sour lime. The contrast between these two plants is particularly stunning in the last week of October and the first few days of November. Closer to ground-level, Bergenia ‘Bressingham Ruby’, planted at the foot of the entry wall to the Secret Garden, shines like a candy apple. Glossy green and elegant during the summer months, by late autumn Bergenia’s foliage has shifted hues from green to orange to cherry red – until finally settling on the ruby-wine color she will hold throughout the early winter months….

Bergenia ‘Bressingham Ruby’

Secret Garden door in October

Further along the garden path, nestled into the nooks and crannies between ledgy outcrops bordering the main garden entrance, Calluna and Erica have begun to turn up their heat just as temperatures here dip below freezing. Calluna vulgaris ‘Multicolor’ has shifted to a shocking shade of vermillion, emphasized by the contrasting blue-tinted foliage of nearby Calluna vulgaris ‘Silver Knight’ and Juniperous horizontalis ‘Wiltonii’. Tiny lavender blossoms continue to flush the tips of the ‘Silver Knight’ heather, in spite of the cold – I gather them up in tiny bouquets for my kitchen table.

Ground covering woody plants, such as Calluna, Erica, Stephanadra, and Cotoneaster, offer vibrant late season color that combines well with with a wide variety of evergreens. Some of my favorites include juniper, (of all sizes and habits), Siberian cypress, (Microbiota), hemlock, (Tsuga), spruce, (Abies) and yew (Taxus). Blue-green masses of foliage and bronzing needle tips provide a soothing foreground or lush, calm backdrop for the more intense, late -autumnal hues in perennial and shrub borders…

Calluna vulgaris ‘Multicolor’ and ‘Silver Knight’, planted with Juniperus horizontalis ‘Wiltonii’, (Blue rug), along the ledgy walkway at Ferncliff…

Calluna vulgaris ‘Multicolor’, forms a blazing carpet against the gray ledge in late October…

Juniperus squamata ‘Holger’, along the Secret Garden steps in October

Stephanandra incisa ‘Crispa’ glows golden-orange against the gray stone wall steps in late October

Stephanandra incisa and Juniperus Pfitzeriana ‘Aurea’ make a beautiful autumn pairing…

Of course fruiting shrubs and trees play an important role in my garden at this time of year and throughout the winter months. Yes, I fully admit to an obsession with colored berries. I collect and treasure fruiting shrubs for their shimmering, confetti-dot effect. While these plants are a feast for the eyes as winter draws near and color grows scarce, more importantly, their berries provide natural food for birds including the finch, cedar wax wings, cardinals and many others. As mentioned in my previous posts, (Autumn Brilliance Part One and also Autumn Brilliance Part Two), Callicarpa dichotoma and Viburnum, including the black-fruited V. carlesii, (Korean spice viburnum), provide berries for many of my feathered friends. As late fall shifts to early winter, other fruiting plants, such as Cotoneaster, begin to stand out in the garden. Ground-hugging Cotoneaster is a great partner for stonewalls, particularly in late autumn, when the bright red fruit and rusty foliage radiates in vibrant contrast to the rock’s cool, gray surface. I like to combine horizontal juniper cultivars with Cotoneaster, allowing both to trail down the side of retaining walls. Bright blue juniper berries sparkle on frosty mornings until they are devoured by hungry chipmunks and song sparrows. Ilex verticillata ‘Red sprite, a long-standing winter favorite, is just beginning its show-stopping performance. This mass of winterberry in my entry garden never fails to lift my spirits during the cold, raw days of late November. In the foreground, blue-tinted Juniperus chinensis ‘Sargentii’ enhances the orange-red brilliance of the berries and the beautiful gray-tones of Dan Snow’s stone wall rise up from behind. When snow finally dusts the winterberry branches, the red fruits float like cherries in a bowl of cream…

Ilex verticillata, and Juniper Sargent in October

Ilex verticillata ‘Red sprite’ with Juniperus chinensis ‘Sargentii’ in late October

Ilex verticillata 'Red sprite' close-up

Ilex verticillata ‘Red sprite’ with Juniperus chinensis ‘Sargentti’ in late October

Juniperus squamata ‘Holger’ and Thymus

Cotoneaster dammeri ‘Eichholz’s, leaves turn burgundy red after the hard frost in October

This Juniperus horizontalis provides blue berries in addition to sea green foliage

Viburnum carlesii, (Korean Spice Viburnum), provides late autumn foliage and black fruit. A small sized shrub, (3′ x 3′), Korean Spice Viburnum is generous with her fragrant flowers in spring…

Callicarpa dichotoma ‘Issai’, shown in an earlier post with golden foliage, is pictured after the hard frost in late October- looking even more magical than before…

Rich brown and subtle bronze tones also begin to appear in the late season, creating opportunities for harmonious pairings with brightly colored foliage and fruit. The cobalt violet hue of Callicarpa dichotoma ‘Issai’ berries, (above), seems even brighter once the shrub’s foliage turns a warm copper brown. Likewise, Microbiota decussata, (Siberian cypress), slowly burnishes from forest green to warm bronze as temperatures dip, playing beautifully against the orange-chartreuse tones of nearby moss and the pyrotechnic-color display of Enkianthus campanulatus ‘Red Bells’, planted at the corner of the walkway…

Microbiota, Thyme, Moss, Path to Northwest meadow in autumn

Microbiota decussata, (Siberian cypress), with Thyme and Moss on the path to the Northwest meadow in October…

Enkianthus companulatus ‘Red Bells’, in October

Microbiota decussata, autumn color close-up

Northwest path to the meadow with a view of amber colored beech in the distance

Although most of the flowers in my garden have faded away, some, such as Geranium ‘Brookside’, continue to surprise me past the first few frosts. When a fuchsia veined, blue-violet bloom appears amid the bright orange and yellow leaves of this gorgeous cranesbill, it can light up a gray October day almost as brightly as the sun. Placed near the golden autumn foliage of Amsonia illustris‘, this plant can easily stop me in my tracks with or without her stunning flowers. The dark hues of Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’ foliage, (or P. opulifolius ‘Summer wine’, or ‘Coppertinia’), pair nicely with these brighter plants, as do many ornamental grasses, dark violet colored sedum and verdigris tinted juniper…

Geranium ‘Brookside’ foliage turns brilliant orange and scarlet. and continues to produce violet blue blossoms with fuscia veins well past the hard frost…

Amsonia illustris, in the entry walk – golden autumn color enhanced by the late frost and nearby orange-hued ornamental grasses in October

Physocarpus 'Diablo' color variation 2

Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’ foliage color, varies from deep oxblood red…

Physocarpus 'Diablo' color variation

to burnished amber…

May the colors of late autumn lift your spirits and encourage you to venture out into the garden with an eye toward extending the season. With a bit of effort and planning, almost any patch of earth can provide a season-spanning garden, filled with color and texture throughout the year. I will meet you back here in just a bit, with more design inspiration for the coming months…

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Article and photographs copyright 2009, Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the sole property of The Gardner’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without express, written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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