Into the August Haze …

August 1st, 2012 § 5 comments § permalink

Ladybells (Adenophora confusa) Spill, Languid Blossoms to the Lawn

August is a languid month; hazy, verdant hills saturated with the weight of humid air. It’s mid-summer, and the fields are ripe. Come stroll with me through the blowzy gardens and wildflower meadow; gathering Black-eyed Susans, Ladybells and Queen Anne’s Lace for carefree bouquets. It’s time for fruit picking in the peach-filled orchards, cocktails on the sun-warmed terrace and drifting off to sleep beside the deep blue lake …

Like an August Sunset, Woodside Daylily Mix adds Fiery Heat to the Entry Garden

Queen Anne’s Lace and Goldenrod in the Wildflower Meadow

Peaches at Walker Farm

The Sun-Warmed Hammock Floats Above the Tickle of Tawny Hairgrass (Native Deschampsia  flexuosa)

Rudbeckia hirta and Adenophora confusa Along the Wildflower Walk

Sultry Summer Moonlight in the Indigo Haze

Remember to Look for the Full, Green Corn Moon Tonight! The First Full Moon of August Moon will Rise Tonight at 7:37pm ET. A Second, Blue Moon  will Rise this Month on August 31st. See the Old Farmer’s Almanac Online for a Listing of Full Moon Dates, Times & Names

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Summer Lost and Found …

August 18th, 2011 § 3 comments § permalink

A Red-Spotted Purple Butterfly (Limenitis arthemis) Visits Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota) in the Wildflower Meadow

Where is summer? Has she flown? No, not yet. The days of this sweetest of seasons may be sliding by, but butterflies still float in meadows and ripe berries fill sunny hillsides. Though a touch of cool melancholy can be felt in evening’s air, there’s time yet for summer daydreaming; sprawled out in fragrant fields, filled with wildflowers …

A Serene Sea of White Lace

And Dusty Rose Hues: Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota) Curled into a Blushing Pom Pom

Light on the Tawny Tones of Tufted Hair Grass (Deschampsia flexuosa)

Wild Blackberries on the Western Hillside

Summer Lost and Found

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, articles and content on this site, (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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Bringing Nature’s Beauty Indoors: Festive Autumn Centerpieces from Garden to Table…

November 20th, 2010 § 4 comments § permalink

Curious Dinner Companions: Dried Leaves of Sago Palm Add a Light, Golden Touch to Traditional Gourds and White Pumpkins

At long last, it seems that the season of feasts and festivities is finally upon us. And like many of you, I am looking for ways to bring the garden’s bounty to my dinner table: pumpkins, squash, carrots and potatoes from the root cellar; peas and berries from the freezer; and fresh greens and alpine strawberries from the hoop houses in my potager. But the garden offers endless delights for the eye as well as the taste buds, and I always like to dress up the house, holiday buffet, and even everyday place settings, with arrangements from the natural world.

From bittersweet-twined jars and low bowls filled with floating candles and cranberries, to luminous hurricane lamps surrounded by pinecones, crabapples and seedpods, I continue to bring a bit of nature’s beauty indoors throughout the late fall and winter. And in creating a few new festive, table-top scenes, it occurred to me that I should pull up some of last year’s photos and decorating ideas from the blog archive. Though many of us are living on tight budgets these days, with a little creativity, a beautiful centerpiece for the dinner table is always within reach. Autumn walks along riverbanks, train tracks and woodland paths last week revealed tangles of bright orange bittersweet, resin-tipped pinecones, bright red hollyberries and a jumble of seedpods amongst the tawny meadow grasses. Bring a bag or basket along next time you take a stroll through the park or walk the dog through the wastelands. You may be surprised and delighted by the natural curiosities you will find. And while it’s possible to spend a fortune on holiday decorations, I often find that bits of twine, recycled jars and old wine bottles topped with candles are just as pretty as more expensive ornaments.

Here are some free and inexpensive ideas from the archive, and you can bet there will be more to come! After all, I always find that getting ready for the party is half the fun!

Bittersweet Vines Wrap Around a Glass Jar to Create a Floating Candle Centerpiece

A Minimalist Centerpiece: Floating Cranberries and Candles in a Low Bowl

Gathered Pinecones and Crabapples Make a Festive and Elegant Centerpiece, Indoors or Out (shown here on a table near the entry to my studio)

Golden Amsonia shimmers in a hand-blown glass vase I brought home one year from Italy

Winterberry Holly Branches Fill an Old Urn (Ilex verticillata)

Ornamental grasses (like this Deschampsia flexuosa) catch the light beautifully, indoors as well as out

A Homemade Terrarium Filled with Native Plants (See more terrarium ideas and step-by-step tutorials here)

A Vase Filled with Dry Hydrangea Paniculata Dresses Up a Stack of Books at the Foot of the Stairs

See More Garden Remnant Ideas from the Archive By Clicking Here and Here Too!

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Article and photographs ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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Welcome October! Capture the Beautiful Flavors & Colors of Harvest Season with Autumn Vegetable Stew…

October 1st, 2010 § 4 comments § permalink

The Colors of the Season – Autumn Harvest Stew

I am a true New Englander. And while I do treasure all of the year’s beautiful seasons, I have to admit that October is my favorite month. I love autumn’s unique combination of fleeting, sensory pleasures; the subtle, changing light, intensely colored foliage, rich textures, savory flavors, warm days and contrasting, chilly nights. My weekdays are filled with end-of-growing-season chores; fall planting and garden designs to finish up, and new, long-term plans and projects to begin. And the busy fall weekends —jam-packed with fairs and friends and parties— are only just beginning. There’s so much to do, and I am loving every minute of it…

Of course, one of my favorite things about fall is the return of the oven. Oh yes -you do remember the oven, don’t you? You know, that heat-creating device you avoided all summer ? Well, on a rainy autumn day like today, the warmth of a fragrant, homey kitchen is exactly what I am seeking. So, I have parked myself here at the kitchen island —laptop and paperwork close by— with a steamy bowl of Autumn-Harvest Stew. Using what I have on hand —an excess of fresh tomatoes, colorful peppers and chubby eggplant— I decided to make one of my favorite fall recipes. And since the weekend is coming up, I figure some of you are bound to have company coming. This is a great party dish to serve a hungry crowd. And what’s really nice about this recipe is that the first step —prepping and pan-frying the vegetables— can be done well in advance. Just mix everything together in a table-pretty French Oven (or any heavy casserole dish), and pop it into the oven a half an hour before you are ready to serve. Voila… Autumn perfection when served with a loaf of crusty, French bread —or with a main course of fish or meat— and a big, bold red wine.

Fresh from the Garden Bold Colored Cubanelle (Cubano) Peppers, Bell Peppers and Tomatoes…

And Deep Violet-Skinned Eggplant…

Autumn Harvest Stew

Ingredients (makes one 2.75 quart French Oven, serves 4-6)

1  large eggplant sliced cross-ways 1/4″ thick

1  pound new potatoes sliced cross 1/8″ thick

1  red bell pepper

1  yellow or orange bell pepper

3  cubanelle (aka cubano) peppers

1  pound fresh tomatoes (peeled and cored)

2 cloves fresh garlic, crushed

Kosher salt

Fresh Ground Pepper

Olive oil for frying**

* You may use your own, or purchased canned tomatoes later in the season. Use the same amount.

** It’s important to use olive oil intended for frying: it allows you to cook at higher temps without smoke or burning

Directions:

Preheat an oven to 375 degrees fahrenheit.

Wash the eggplant and remove ends. Slice crosswise into 1/4″ rounds. Set eggplant slices on paper towels to drain any excess water. Wash new potatoes (peeling is optional, on new potatoes, I leave the skin on) and slice into 1/8″ thick rounds. Wash, core and seed the peppers. Slice lengthwise into 1/8″ strips. Set vegetables aside. Peel and core tomatoes (I peel my tomatoes by scorching them briefly over the blue flame on my burner. Some prefer to scald them quickly in hot water. Either method works.) Place the tomatoes in a bowl and mash gently with your hands. Set aside.

Pour 1/8″ of frying olive oil into a very large pan. Turn on the burner to high. Once the oil is very, very hot, add the eggplant and brown on both sides. Remove with a slotted spoon to a bed of paper towels. Next, brown the potatoes (add more oil if necessary) on both sides and drain on paper towels. Add the peppers to the pan and cook until just tender, and remove to towels to drain oil for a moment (patting gently). Add the vegetables to the casserole dish/ French/Dutch oven and stir. Add the crushed Pour the tomatoes and crushed garlic on top of the fried vegetables and stir. Add salt and pepper to taste (about 1/2 tsp of each is good) and stir once again.

Cover the casserole dish with a lid and place in oven. Cook at 375 degrees fahrenheit for 30 minutes.

Serve hot with fresh baked bread.

Autumn Harvest Stew

Viburnum trilobum (Cranberrybush viburnum leaf)

Tufted Hair Grass (Deschampsia flexuosa), Goldenrod (Solidago), Rudbeckia hirta seed pods, and red Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia)

Backlit Maple Leaf

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Article and photographs ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through our affiliate links. A small percentage of any sale originating from The Gardener’s Eden will go toward web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you for your support!

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