Upon a Winter-Kissed, Autumn Day: Magical, First Snowfall in the Garden . . .

November 9th, 2013 § Comments Off on Upon a Winter-Kissed, Autumn Day: Magical, First Snowfall in the Garden . . . § permalink

Secret Garden, First Snowfall - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com A Snow-Kissed, November Morning Surprise in the Secret Garden

November is an unpredictable month; nebulous skies shifting with blue-grey mystery. One moment the forest is flooded with warm light and the next, swept up in a chill. The first snow fell here yesterday —dusting the garden in a pretty swirl of lacy white — and the balmy days of October are but a beautiful, fading memory.

Helleborus x hybridus and Hakonechloa macra in the Secret Garden - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Frosted, Starry Helleborus x hybridus Leaves & Winter Blond Hakonechloa macra in the Secret Garden

I’ve a few more garden chores to finish up this month, but with few exceptions, cutting back perennials is not on my list. No, there’s too much charm to be found in a candle-lit, winter garden to let a case of über-tidiness ruin the show. After freezing fog and icy mist settle on a cold autumn night, a morning walk through the crystalline borders is pure, diamond-dust-delight. I prefer to enjoy the frozen blowziness of tufts, tassels and wayward strands throughout the winter, and so, set the shears aside ’till early spring . . .

Snow-Dusted Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis 'Morning Light') - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Evocative of Fine Venetian Lace, the Garden’s Delicate Textures, Traced in Snow White 

Secret Garden Steps with Snow - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Secret Garden Steps, Dotted with Minty Green and Chocolate Brown, then Sprinkled in Confectioner’s Sugar

Autumn Leaves and Snow - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Swirling Sangria-Hued Leaves Mix with White, Wind-Driven Snow in the Garden (Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’, Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’, Juniperus chinensis ‘Sargentii’)

November Snow Squall in the Garden - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Mixed Border —Packed with Fruiting Shrubs, Still-Standing Perennials and Ornamental Grasses— Whips About Wildly in the November Wind. Why Surrender the Beauty too Soon? Set Aside the Shears and Sit Back with a Warm Cup of Mulled Cider.

Tea Viburnum Fruits (Viburnum setigerum) with Snow - michaela medina harlowTea Viburnum Fruits Swing, Radiant as Ruby Chandeliers from Snow-Dusted Branches (Viburnum setigerum)

Siberian Cypress -Microbiota decussata with snow -michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Siberian Cypress (Microbiota decussata) and Wooly Thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) on the North Ridge Path

Flame Grass - Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens with snow in November - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Bittersweet Strands of White-Tufted Flame Grass Dance Agains the Blue-Green Curtain of Conifers (Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens)

Birch Trees in Snow Squall - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Pretty, White, Vertical Lines of Paper Birch Carry the Eye Up and Onward, Through the Snow-Swirled Rusty-Grey Hills

Photography & Textⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, artwork, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of Michaela Medina Harlow and/or The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you!

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May Merriment . . .

May 2nd, 2013 § 2 comments § permalink

Pulmonaria_longifolia_ 'Raspberry Splash'_michaela_medina_harlow_thegardenerseden.comPulmonaria longifolia ‘Raspberry Splash’ Greets the First Day of May

Welcome beautiful, light-hearted, May. Named for the Greek goddess Maia, this is the month of springtime flowers. Fragrance, color, warmth and soft light; it seems each and every morning, when I step into the garden, something new awaits. It’s time for May merriment, and a season filled with fresh delights . . .

Narcissus_cyclamineus_'Lemon_Silk'_michaela_medina_harlow_thegardenerseden.comPossibly the Prettiest Yellow Ever: Narcissus cyclamineus ‘Lemon Silk’

Viburnum_x_bodnantense_'Dawn'_michaela_medina_harlow_thegardenerseden.com Enjoying the Peak of Fragrant Delight from Viburnum x bodnantense ‘Dawn’

Narciuss_'Ice_Follies'_michaela_thegardenerseden.com Narcissus ‘Ice Follies’ Catches the Morning Light

Helleborus x hybridus 'Royal Heritage Strain' s Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’

Narcissus_'Ice_Follies'_michaela_medina_harlow_thegardenerseden.comOne of the Most Popular Landscape Daffodils, Narcissus ‘Ice Follies’, Fills the Long, Meadow Border

Viburnum_x_bodnantense_'Dawn'_WM_HiRes_michaela_medina_harlow_thegardenerseden I Keep Photographing the Bodnant Viburnum, Hoping to Somehow Capture its Fragrance. Oh, if Only!

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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The Seasons are Changing & It’s Time to Begin Burying Our Bulb Treasures …

September 16th, 2012 § 5 comments § permalink

A Tisket, A Tasket, A Basket Full of Narcissus . . .

Anticipation. True gardeners really know how to revel in the wait. We are, essentially, pleasure-delayers. Gardening differs from many modern-day activities in one significant way: it is not an instant gratification activity. Not at all. Gardeners do a lot of waiting, watching and wondering. And really, this waiting becomes a way of extending our pleasure; a key part of the fun. What will the new Narcissus smell like? Will the white Erythronium blossom at the same time as the rose-tinted Hellebore? How long will it take for the Muscari to form a blue pool of blossoms at the base of the stone wall? Will the voles eat all of the crocus this year? I like wondering about things. I love forgetting about a buried treasure and then, in spring, thrilling upon the re-discovery.

Patience. Gardening has taught me many things, and I would say that whatever patience I possess —and heaven knows I am not known for it— I developed through the practice of gardening. Working with nature helps me to balance my impulsive nature, and has —quite literally— made me a more grounded person. I have a fiery personality. The act of gardening calms me down and soothes my moods. I learned this in childhood, and perhaps that is why I feel so strongly about connecting children to the non-instant-gratification pleasure of gardening. Waiting six months for a tulip to bloom is the exact opposite of waiting a nano-second for a text message. And I think that is a good thing…

Crocus Petals Unfurling

The ritual of planting bulbs is, to me, a most delicious process. First, there is the hunting and then there is the choosing. Of course, the catalogues from fine companies, like Brent and Becky’s Bulbs, arrive in early summer, and I fill them with sticky notes and scribbles. Then —usually by mid-July— I begin filling my virtual carts online (the earlier you order, the better the deals). And oh, the wonderful, wonderful pleasure of selecting from amongst all of the beautiful, jewel-like treasures. With a garden as large as mine, I order most common bulbs in great quantity. But there are many opportunities for small-scale vignettes, showcasing those rare little surprises here as well; particularly in the Secret Garden.

Most spring-blooming bulbs perform best when planted after the soil has cooled to 50 degrees or lower (usually in mid-autumn here in VT) but before it has begun to freeze. (If your bulbs arrive earlier, store them in a cool, dry place until it’s time to plant). Of course, there are exceptions to this rule. Winter aconites (Eranthus), trout lilies (Erythroniums), iris, and certain other corms, rhizomes, tubers and bulbs, (Galanthus for example) should be planted in late summer or very early autumn. Take care to give these species more time to establish. In fact some bulbs and corms, such as snowdrops (Galanthus), are best transplanted ‘in the green’ (meaning, they do very well when divided and transplanted in spring, after blooming). If you are new to the world of bulbs, pay close attention to the fine-print when selecting and ordering; taking care to research the cultural requirements of each species, to avoid disappointment…

Leucojum aestivum (Summer Snowflake) in the Secret Garden – This Gorgeous Flower Takes My Breath Away…

Scillia hispanica  (Spanish Bluebells) are Beautiful Both in a Vase and in the Garden, Planted Here with Companion Hosta, Emerging in May

Narcissus ‘Fragrant Rose’ in the Northwestern Garden, Beneath the Syringa ‘Mme. Lemoine’

When designing with bulbs —for myself of for my clients— I rely heavily upon my garden notes and photos, carefully taken the previous spring. I try to provide all plants, including bulbs, with their preferred, natural growing conditions. Most bulbs, particularly the Tulips and Daffodils, need good drainage. This is especially important in winter and again in the summer. So, I try to avoid low-spots in the garden, where water will settle. Other ephemerals, such as the woodsy Erythroniums, prefer a cool and shady spot in the garden. Snowdrops, Winter Aconites and Erythroniums do very well beneath the shadowy canopy of shrubs and trees. When planning a springtime bulb-show, it’s very important to remember that most bulbs will eventually go into summer dormancy. Companion planting is the most effective way to conceal withering bulb foliage (never cut foliage back until the bulb has completed it’s yearly cycle, your daffodils and other bulbs need to photosynthesize).  Some easy combinations to begin with: daffodils planted between day lilies on a slope, trout lilies (Erythronium) planted amongst coral bells (Heuchera), and bluebells planted between ferns or late-emerging hosta. There are many, many great combinations (see some pictured below). Some companies, including Brecks, Spring Hill, Dutch Gardens, Old House Gardens and Brent & Becky’s Bulbs, offer great companion suggestions. I encourage you to look back at your garden photos and notes, and experiment with perennial combinations all your own. Remember, the experimentation and surprise is part of the pleasure! Plant bulbs that prefer full-sun and good drainage with similar perennials, such as ornamental grass and day lilies. Find shady spots between broad-leafed perennial plants, shrubs and trees for woodland bulbs. You will be delighted with the results all season-long…

A Pool of Blue Muscari has Formed Around the Base of Dan Snow’s Retaining Wall. In summer, Sedum ‘Vera Jameson’ will Take Over the Show, Concealing the Yellowing Muscari Foliage, Until it Withers Away.

Narcissus ‘Snipe’ planted with Sedum, near the Base of the Secret Garden Steps. A nearby Daphne and emerging coral bells (Heuchera) will conceal the yellowing daffodil leaves as they die back later in dormancy.

A Common, Striped Crocus in Radiant Violet and Orange (from an unnamed bargain batch)

The Spike-Hair of Narcissus ‘Rip Van Winkle’, a Spontaneous Purchase from Brent and Becky’s Bulbs, Always Makes Me Smile.  Daffodil Foliage Goes Yellow in Dormancy so I Plant Them Where They Will Disappear Between Perennials

Camassia quamash is an Early-Summer Blooming Beauty. I Love Using It in Meadow-Combinations with Ornamental Grass and Other Native Wild Flowers. Read More About This Beauty in My Post About Camassia Here.

Fritillaria, One of My Favorite Spring Flowers, Does Very Well When Planted in Ornamental Grass Gardens and Meadows

As the Snow Recedes, Crocus tommasinianus (aka ‘tommies’) Burst Forth from the Earth in a Luminous-Lavender Hue. Here Planted with Ground- Covering Heuchera Along the Entry Walk.

Galanthus ‘S. Arnott’ – If You Aren’t Careful, Snowdrops Can Become a Special Obsession All Their Own…

Chinodoxa luciliae gigantea – Glory of the Snow will Always Have a Special Place in My Heart. The Blue Flowers Bloom Very Early, and Multiply to Form Carpets. Low-Growing Chinodoxa Do Very Well Planted in Lawns (delay first mowing for best results) or Beneath Spring Blooming Shrubs and Trees. Imagine Them Combined with a Red Flowering Witch Hazel (such as H. x intermedia ‘Diane’)

Bulbs and Companions in the Secret Garden (Here, ‘Sterling’ Narcissus is planted with Euphorbia, Heuchera and Matteuccia pensylvanica beneath Stewartia pseudocamilla)

Bulbs and Companions in the Secret Garden (From left: Erythronium, Narcissus ‘Sterling’, Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’, with Emerging Actaea simplex and ferns)

Erythronium (the species is also known by various interesting common names, from dog-tooth violet and turk’s cap to trout lily) in the Secret Garden. Read More About Erythronium by Clicking Back to a Special Post on These Hat-Like Spring Beauties, Here.

Muscari at the Base of the Secret Garden Steps in Early Spring. Note the Emerging Perennials, Surrounding the Blooming Bulbs.

Scillia siberica  (Siberian squill) Makes an Early Appearance Beneath Shrubs in the Entry Garden 

Bulbs and Companions form a Colorful Carpet Along the Secret Garden Entry in Early Spring. (Daphne ‘Carol Mackie’ is the fragrant, mounded shrub on the left, and lavender-blue Phlox divaricata ‘Clouds of Perfume’ scents the air. Also here, Muscari, Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’ and various Sedum)

Ground-Cover Companions for Bulbs Can Play with Foliage and Flower Contrasts. Here, Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ offers a bit of drama in this Secret Garden vignette when combined with Tiarella cordifolia (foam flower) and Leucojum aestevium (Summer Snowflake)

The Secret Garden in Early Spring: ‘Sterling’ Narcissus, various Euphorbia, Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’, Matteuccia pensylvanica, Tiarella cordifolia, Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’, Paeonia mouton x lutea ‘High Noon’, Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’, Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’, all beneath Stewartia pseudocamilla

Pulmonaria saccharata ‘Mrs. Moon’, here in the central garden (planted with Alchemilla mollis) is a great companion plant for early bulbs…

Crocus Emerging from Winter-Dried Grass

For Springtime Dreams & Obsessions: Bulb by Ana Pavord

Garden Design and Installation: Michaela Medina Harlow

Stonework: Dan Snow

A Version of This Post First Appeared on The Gardener’s Eden in September 2010

Photography and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

Do you enjoy The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through affiliate links. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to this site, helping to cover web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you so much for your support!

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The Moment of Spring: A Walk Along The Secret Garden Path in Magical May

May 11th, 2011 § 3 comments § permalink

Pretty is the Cool Morning Mist; Softening the Landscape and Intensifying the Fragrance of Springtime

So busy is the month of May… Days pass so quickly, I can barely remember to flip the pages of my desktop calendar. Things in the garden change rapidly from day to day, and I try to take a different path to the driveway each morning, so I won’t miss a single unfurling leaf or flower. But no matter how hard I try, I can’t put sweet springtime on pause to wait for me. And even if I could, would I want to restrain the exuberant sprint of nature, even for a day?

The Pink Buds of Koreanspice Viburnum (V. carlesii) Swell on Graceful Branches; Draped Upon Grey Stone

Only a Week Ago, Trees Stood Bare and A Few Blossoming Shrubs Played Solo…

Now, Everywhere I Look, New Leaves Appear

The Bold Colors of European Beech (Fagus sylvatica ‘Riversii’) Sing…

In Perfect Harmony with Blushing Daphne (D. x burkwoodii ‘Carol Mackie’)

Her Sweet & Spicy Scent Seducing all Who Draw Near…

 

 

 

 

 

 

Favorite Combinations Reemerge… Delicate Foam Flower & Cimicifuga… Woodland Phlox & Ferns…

It Seems Everything is Springing to Life at Once. Breathless, I Barely Keep Up…

Creating Vignettes in Summertime Spaces…

And Drinking In the Beautiful, Fleeting Moment of Springtime…

Sanguinaria canadensis – Bloodroot Blossoms

Moonlight Hydrangea Vine (Schizophragma hydrangeoides ‘Moonlight’) Leafs Out- Sprawling Over a Candle Niche in the Secret, Walled Garden at Ferncliff

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’

The Fading & Falling Blossoms of Viburnum bodnantense ‘Dawn’

***

Secret Garden Walls and All Stonework at Ferncliff is by Vermont Artist Dan Snow

Secret Garden Design and Installation by Michaela (for details on plantings see Ferncliff and Secret Garden pages at left)

Article and Photographs ⓒ Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All photographs, articles and content on this site, (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced or reposted without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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Welcome Sweet Month of May …

May 2nd, 2011 § 3 comments § permalink

Viburnum bodnantense ‘Dawn’ at the Secret Garden Door. Read more about this fragrant beauty (click here)

It’s May again, and the garden springs to life —filled with fragrance and color— greeting warm sunny days and soft, gentle rains with all the beauty in the world.

Welcome sweet, sweet May…

Blossoms Ripple in the Reflecting Bowl

And Sweet Fragrance of Fothergilla ‘Mt. Airy’ Fills the Gentle Morning Air. To learn more about Fothergilla (click here) and also (click here)

Viola labradorica. Read more about the Labrador Violet (click here)

Erythronium tuolumnense – Read more about the beautiful trout lily (click here)

Narcissus ‘Abba’ (Division 4 – A gorgeous, double Narcissus with glorious fragrance)

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’. Read more about the Lovely Lenten Rose (click here)

Secret Garden in May (Erythronium tuolumnense, Narcissus ‘Sterling’, Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’ with other emerging perennials)

***

Article and Photographs ⓒ Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All photographs, articles and content on this site, (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced or reposted without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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If They Were Flowers: Ode to the Oscars Presenting The Gardener’s Eden’s Second Annual Academy Award Horticouture Fashion Review…

February 28th, 2011 § 14 comments § permalink

Dress by Aechmea tillandsioides (Bromeliaceae)

As Worn by Radiant, New Mother Penelope Cruz (Gucci) with Javier Bardem. Photo: Matt Sayles/AP via Yahoo

Last year, at the time of the Academy Awards, I was conservatory-sitting for out-of-town friends. The day after the show, while tending to the exotic beauties contained within the tiny greenhouse, all I could think about was how much they resembled the designer frocks I’d seen the night before. Like a crazed paparazza, I dashed from aisle to aisle, snapping photos of the tropical starlets in my care. I documented my red carpet observations in the post ” Ode to the Oscars: If They Were Flowers…” (click here to revisit the photos & essay from last year’s Oscars).

The dazzling display of gorgeous gowns at last night’s 83 Annual Academy Award show —red carpet blossoming with a parade of flamboyant hot-house flowers and sparkling ice-queens— inspired yet another evening of horticouture dreams. Sensational as the Oscar gowns were in silk, tulle, sequins and satin, imagine —if you will— what if they were flowers?

Dress by Camellia japonica

As Worn by Hostess Anne Hathaway (Valentino). Image: John Shearer/Getty via Yahoo

Dress by Iris

As Worn by Elegant Amy Adams (L’Wren Scott). Image: John Shearer/Getty via Yahoo

Dress by Abutilon hybridum

As Worn by Stunning Jennifer Hudson (Versace). Image: Jason Merrit/Getty via Yahoo

Dress by Phalenopsis

As Worn by Sultry Scarlett Johansson (Dolce & Gabanna). Image: Matt Sayles/AP via Yahoo

Icy Tulle Dress by Jack Frost & Rudbeckia Hirta

As Worn by Sparkling Halle Berry (Marchesa). Image: John Shearer/Getty via Yahoo

Dress by Paeonia lactiflora ‘Raspberry Sundae’

As Worn by the Sweet Hailee Steinfeld. Image: Jason Merrit/Getty via Yahoo

Gown by Kalanchoe ‘Mangini’

As Worn by Striking Jennifer Lawrence (Calvin Klein). Image: Steve Granitz/WireImage via Yahoo

Dress by Fothergilla ‘Mt. Airy’

As Worn by Floaty Hillary Swank (Gucci). Image: Jason Merrit/Getty via Yahoo

Dress by Hibiscus

As Worn by Last Year’s Best Actress Award-Winner: Ravishing-in-Red,  Sandra Bullock (Vera Wang). Image: Steve Granitz/WireImage via Yahoo

Dress by Allium schoenoprasum

As Worn by Ethereal Mila Kunis (Eli Saab). Image: Jason Merrit/Getty via Yahoo

Dress by Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’

As Worn by Academy Award Winner for Best Actress, the Lovely, Expectant Natalie Portman (Rodarte). Image: Jason Merrit/Getty via Yahoo

Did you watch the Oscars last night? Which star do you think was best dressed? What flower do you think they resembled?

***

Article and Botanical Photos are ⓒ Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All Academy Award Photos are copyright as noted and linked (click on each photo for source)

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Behold the Beautiful Autumn Tapestry: A Kaleidoscopic Carpet at Our Feet…

November 16th, 2010 § 3 comments § permalink

Geranium ‘Brookside’ shows off in sensational shades of red and orange in mid-November

Near-metallic gleam: Dryopteris erythrosora ‘Brilliance’ (Autumn Brilliance fern)

Our native ground-covering Pachysandra procumbens (Allegheny spurge) provides beautiful and variable autumn color beneath shrubs along my garden’s entryway and along the shady parts of the path

Now that I have accepted the skeletal lines and architectural drama of the November forest, it’s hard not to fall in love with late autumn’s incredible beauty. One morning it’s foggy, moody mountaintops and the next it’s the surprise of sparkling hoar frost at sunrise. The last weeks of autumn can be a truly magical time in the garden. Walking along the paths, digging holes here and there for spring bulbs, my eyes are drawn to the kaleidoscopic color surrounding my feet. Bronze, vermillion, gold and violet; the ground looks as if it’s covered in a collection of precious, spilled jewels. Some of these late-autumn beauties always provide rich garden color -often in the form of variegation or lacy leaves. But many garden ground-covers, including Bergenia ‘Bressingham Ruby’Geranium ‘Brookside’ (Cranesbill) and Dryopteris erythrosora ‘Brilliance’, wait until late in the season to put on their most vibrant show.

When designing a garden, I always give careful consideration to the flooring. In much the same way an interior designer thoughtfully selects wood or marble or carpeting for a space, I purposefully choose my ground-covering options in outdoor rooms. Of course, knowing a bit about how the tapestry of foliage will change throughout the seasons is invaluable. Will the green leaves of a particular plant become gold or orange in October, playing off violet-hued shrubs? Will the rusty, late-season tones of a low-growing conifer help to bring out the blue-tint of a statuesque spruce towering above? As I made my rounds in the garden this morning, I snapped a few photos to give you a better idea of how ground-covering foliage can add to the late season garden. And much like the exquisite Oriental carpets and Persian rugs found in beautiful homes, low-growing plants can add amazing warmth and texture to garden rooms, not only in autumn and winter, but at any time of the year…

Pachysandra procumbens (Allegheny spurge) mottled green and bronze in patterns like marble

Sedum ‘Angelina’ continues to glow in all of her orange-tipped chartreuse glory, as she creeps along the stone pathway

Bergenia ‘Bressingham Ruby’ at the Secret Garden Door (Other plants include Galium odoratum, Euphorbia, Heuchera, Lamium maculatum and Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’)

Microbiota decussata is just beginning to show off the beautiful, bronzy, late autumn and winter color I so adore

Along the Secret Garden path, green and white Lamium maculatum ‘Orchid Frost’ and Pulmonaria saccharata ‘Mrs. Moon’ combine nicely with the glossy and  verdant leaves of  Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’ and the gorgeous late season yellow of Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’

Heuchera americana ‘Green Spice’ takes on lovely orange veining and shines beside the low, gold Euphorbia along the path

Calluna vulgaris ‘Multicolor’ glows in electric shades of orange —intensified here by the blue-green color of Juniperus horizontalis ‘Bar Harbor’— while the Spring Heath (Erica carnea) softens the impact with its medium green

Geranium ‘Brookside’ blazes brightly in the garden amongst the brown and tan of fallen leaves

Microbiota decussata with Thymus Pseudolanuginosus (better known by the easier-to-pronounce common name, ‘wooly thyme’)

***

Article and photographs ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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Buried Treasures: From Ruby Tulips & Golden Narcissus, to Sapphire Bluebells, Some of Springtime’s Loveliest Jewels are Planted in the Cool, Autumn Earth…

September 18th, 2010 § 1 comment § permalink

A tisket, a tasket, a basket full of Narcissus. These bulbs were planted last autumn in my garden…

Anticipation. True gardeners really know how to revel in the wait. We are, essentially, pleasure-delayers. Gardening differs from many modern-day activities in one significant way: it is not an instant gratification activity. Not at all. Gardeners do a lot of waiting, watching and wondering. And really, this waiting becomes a way of extending our pleasure. In fact, I think the waiting is a key part of the fun. What will the new Narcissus smell like? Will the white Erythronium blossom at the same time as the rose-tinted Hellebore? How long will it take for the Muscari to form a blue pool of blossoms at the base of the stone wall? I like wondering about things. I love forgetting about a buried treasure and then, in spring, thrilling upon the re-discovery.

Patience. Gardening has taught me many things, and I would say that whatever patience I possess —and heaven knows I am not known for it— I developed through the practice of gardening. Working with nature helps me to balance my impulsive nature, and has —quite literally— made me a more grounded person. I have a somewhat fiery personality, and the act of gardening calms me down; soothes my moods. I learned this in childhood, and perhaps this is why I feel so strongly about connecting children to the non-instant-gratification pleasure of gardening. Waiting six months for a tulip to bloom is the exact opposite of waiting a nano-second for a text message. And I think that is a good thing…

Crocus Petals Unfurling ⓒ Michaela at TGE

The ritual of planting bulbs is, to me, a most delicious process. First, there is the hunting and then there is the choosing. Of course, the catalogues from fine companies, like Brent and Becky’s Bulbs, arrive in early summer, and I fill them with sticky notes and scribbles. Then —usually by mid-July— I begin filling my virtual carts online (the earlier you order, the better the deals). And oh, the wonderful, wonderful pleasure of selecting from amongst all of the beautiful, jewel-like treasures. With a garden as large as Ferncliff, I order most common bulbs in great quantity. But there are many opportunities for small-scale vignettes, showcasing those rare little surprises here as well; particularly in the Secret Garden.

Most spring-blooming bulbs perform best when planted after the soil has cooled to 50 degrees or lower ( usually in mid-autumn here in VT) but before it has begun to freeze. (If your bulbs arrive earlier, store them in a cool, dry place until it’s time to plant). Of course, there are exceptions to this rule. Winter aconites (Eranthus), trout lilies (Erythroniums), iris, and certain other corms, rhizomes, tubers and bulbs, (Galanthus for example) should be planted in late summer or very early autumn. Take care to give these species more time to establish. In fact some bulbs and corms, such as snowdrops (Galanthus), are best transplanted ‘in the green’ (meaning, they do very well when divided and transplanted in spring, after blooming). If you are new to the world of bulbs, pay close attention to the fine-print when selecting and ordering; taking care to research the cultural requirements of each species, to avoid disappointment…

Leucojum aestivum (Summer Snowflake) in the Secret Garden at Ferncliff – This Gorgeous Flower Takes My Breath Away…

Scillia hispanica  (Spanish Bluebells) are Beautiful Both in a Vase and in the Garden, Planted Here with Companion Hostas in May at Ferncliff

Narcissus ‘Fragrant Rose’ in the Northwestern Garden, Beneath the Syringa ‘Mme. Lemoine’

When designing with bulbs, I rely heavily upon my garden notes and photos, carefully taken the previous spring. I try to provide all plants, including bulbs, with their preferred, natural growing conditions. Most bulbs, particularly the tulips and daffodils, need good drainage. This is especially important in winter and again in the summer. So, I try to avoid low-spots in the garden, where water will settle. Other ephemerals, such as the woodsy erythroniums, prefer a cool and shady spot in the garden. Snowdrops, winter aconites and erythroniums do very well beneath the shadowy canopy of shrubs and trees. When planning a springtime bulb-show, it’s very important to remember that most bulbs will eventually go into summer dormancy. Companion planting is the most effective way to conceal withering bulb foliage (never cut foliage back until the bulb has completed it’s yearly cycle, your daffodils and other bulbs need to photosynthesize).  Some easy combinations to begin with: daffodils planted between day lilies on a slope, trout lilies (Erythronium) planted amongst coral bells (Heuchera), and bluebells planted between ferns or late-emerging hosta. There are many, many great combinations (see some pictured below). Some companies, including Brecks, Spring Hill, Burpee, Dutch Gardens and Brent & Becky’s Bulbs, offer great companion suggestions. I encourage you to look back at your garden photos and notes, and experiment with perennial combinations all your own. Remember, the experimentation and surprise is part of the pleasure! Plant bulbs that prefer full-sun and good drainage with similar perennials, such as ornamental grass and day lilies. Find shady spots between broad-leafed perennial plants, shrubs and trees for woodland bulbs. You will be delighted with the results all season-long…

A Pool of Blue Muscari has Formed around the Base of Dan Snow’s Retaining Wall at Ferncliff. In summer, Sedum ‘Vera Jameson’ will take over the show, concealing the yellowing muscari foliage, until it withers away.

Narcissus ‘Snipe’ planted with Sedum, near the Base of the Secret Garden Steps at Ferncliff. A nearby Daphne and emerging coral bells (Heuchra) will conceal the yellowing daffodil leaves as they die back later in dormancy.

A Common, Striped Crocus in Radiant Violet and Orange (from an unnamed bargain batch)

Narcissus ‘Rip Van Winkle’, purchase from Brent and Becky’s Bulbs, here at Ferncliff. These daffodils go into dormancy and disappear between three enormous Amsonia illustris.

Camassia quamash is an early-summer blooming beauty. I like it in meadow-combinations with ornamental grass and other native wild flowers. Read more about this beauty in my post about Camassia here.

Fritillaria, one of my favorite spring flowers, does very well planted in the ornamental grass garden

As the Snow Recedes, Crocus tommasinianus (aka ‘tommies’) Burst Forth from the Earth in a Luminous-Lavender Hue. Here planted with Ground- Covering Heuchera at Ferncliff.

Galanthus ‘S. Arnott’ – If You Aren’t Careful, Snowdrops Can Become a Special Obsession All Their Own…

Chinodoxa luciliae gigantea – Glory of the Snow will always have a special place in my heart. The blue flowers bloom very early, and multiply to form carpets. Low-growing chinodoxa do very well planted in lawns (delay first mowing for best results), or beneath spring blooming shrubs and trees. Imagine them combined with a red witch hazel (such as ‘Diane’)

Bulbs and Companions in the Secret Garden at Ferncliff (Here, ‘Sterling’ Narcissus is planted with Euphorbia, Heuchera and Matteuccia pensylvanica beneath Stewartia pseudocamilla)

Bulbs and Companions in the Secret Garden at Ferncliff (From left: Erythronium, Narcissus ‘Sterling’, Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’, with emerging Actaea racemosa and ferns)

Erythronium (the species is also known by various interesting common names, from dog-tooth violet and turk’s cap to trout lily) in the Secret Garden at Ferncliff. Read more about Erythronium by clicking back to a special post on these hat-like spring beauties, here.

Muscari at the Base of the Secret Garden Steps in Early Spring. Notice the emerging perennials, surrounding all of the bulbs.

Scillia siberica  (Siberian squill) Makes an Early Appearance Beneath Shrubs at Ferncliff…

Bulbs and Companions form a Colorful Carpet Along the Secret Garden Entry – Ferncliff in Early Spring. (Daphne ‘Carol Mackie’ is the fragrant, mounded shrub on the left, and lavender-blue Phlox divaricata ‘Clouds of Perfume’ scents the air. Also here, Muscari, Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’ and various Sedum)

Ground-Cover Companions for Bulbs Can Play with Foliage and Flower Contrasts. Here, Cimicifuga racemosa ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ offers a bit of drama in this Secret Garden vignette when combined with Tiarella cordifolia (foam flower) and Leucojum aestevium (Summer Snowflake)

The Secret Garden in Early Spring: ‘Sterling’ Narcissus, various Euphorbia, Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’, Matteuccia pensylvanica, Tiarella cordifolia, Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’, Paeonia mouton x lutea ‘High Noon’, Cimicifuga racemosa ‘Hillside Black Beauty’, Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’, all beneath Stewartia pseudocamilla

Pulmonaria saccharata ‘Mrs. Moon’, here in the central garden at Ferncliff (planted with Alchemilla mollis) is a freat companion plant for early bulbs…

Crocus Emerging from Dried Grass at Ferncliff

You can read more about bulb-mania, and find the definitive guide to bulbs, by Anna Pavord, in my post for Barnes and Noble’s Garden Variety Blog here.

Article and photos are ⓒ Michaela at TGE

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Fashionably Late & Dressed in Maroon: Sweetly-Scented, Autumn Fairy Candles Light Up the Shadowy, Secret Garden…

September 16th, 2010 § 6 comments § permalink

Actaea simplex/Cimicifuga simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty {also known variously as Fairy Candles, Black Snake Root & Black Cohosh}

Actaea simlex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’, here in the Secret Garden with Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’, Lamium maculatum, Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’, Paeonia mouton x lutea ‘High Noon’, Stewartia pseudocamilla, and a background of bronzing Matteuccia pensylvanica {native Ostrich fern}

True, there are those who say it’s rude to be tardy, but it seems to me that the more interesting characters always arrive a wee-bit late to the party. Of course, they are always gorgeous, a bit mysterious, and often wearing something dark and dramatic. Well, such is the case with Actaea simplex {aka Cimicifuga simplex} ‘Hillside Black Beauty’, in my Secret Garden. Clad in exquisitely-cut, deep, velvet-maroon, the Fairy Candles —as I like to call them— saunter into bloom in September; wearing their lilac-tinted, flower plumes the way an old-fashioned bombshell might drape her shoulders with an exotic, perfumed boa. Filling the cool, misty air of the Secret Garden with the most delightfully intoxicating scent, {noticed and adored by hungry bees and other early autumn pollinators} Actaea simplex arrives late on the garden-scene with the kind of laid-back elegance of which modern Hollywood starlets can only dream…

Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ in the Secret Garden {see companion plant listing above}

Known by various intriguing aliases —including Black Snake Root, Black Cohosh and (my favorite) Fairy Candles— Actaea simplex was formerly categorized in taxonomic circles as Cimicifuga simplex (sim-e- sih-few-gah sim-plex); a delightful tongue-twister that, once mastered, I actually came to adore (In fact, I still refer to her by the original botanical name – the Latin just seems to capture her… Je ne sais quoi). Native to the moist, cool woodlands of eastern North America, this statuesque beauty will easily reach 4-6′ tall — spikes in full bloom— when she’s given the conditions she prefers. Hardy in USDA zones 4-8, Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’, and the similarly beautiful ‘Brunette’, require a consistently moist and amply shaded location to really strut their stuff. Too much sun will bleach and burn-out her gorgeous foliage , and dry soil will quickly do her in.

It’s a shame the fragrance of Actaea simplex’s blossoms can not be transmitted electronically. I wish you could sample the delicious scent…

A classy beauty like this demands fine company. And with her year-round, velvety, maroon attire, chartreuse and gold foliage make gorgeous music with her in the low-light. I like to combine the dark foliage of  A. simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ and ‘Brunette’ with low, spreading, golden Japanese Forest Grass (Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’ or ‘Aureola’), mound-shaped Hosta ‘August Moon’, and for serious drama, I play her against my favorite chartreuse -stunner, Sambucus racemosa ‘Sutherland Gold’ (European elder). Yes, Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ is a true garden bombshell – but of the dark variety, not the blonde— like Hedy Lamarr. She’s sultry, she’s elegant, and she really knows how to bring down the house in style….

Inspiration: Hedy Lamarr {image: still from ‘The Strange Woman’ United Artists 1946 (public domain)– via improbable research}

Hedy Lamarr {Alfred Eisenstaedt, 1938 – image via zimbio.com}

Hedy Lamarr {image via zimbio.com}

Hedy Lamarr was an Austrian-born actress popular in films of the 1930s and 40s. Read more about Hedy Lamarr on her IMDB page by clicking here.

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Article and photos (excepting portraits of Hedy Lamarr) are ⓒ Michaela at TGE

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Well Fiddle-Dee-Dee: Unfurling Spring Pleasures in the Forest at Ferncliff…

April 30th, 2010 § 4 comments § permalink

Fiddlehead ferns unfurling in the Secret Garden – Ostrich Fern (Matteuccia pensylvanica)

Lady fern ‘Lady in Red’ (Athyrium filix feminina), in my garden

Oh yes, we are smack-dab-in-the-middle of fiddlehead season here in the Northeast; one of spring’s most delightful and ephemeral pleasures at my forest home in Vermont. Here on my ledgy site, Ostrich ferns, (a member of the cliff fern family), are abundant; producing large, tightly curled heads as they emerge from the ground in April and early May. Of course fiddleheads are beautiful to behold, and in my garden I enjoy their delicate springtime beauty paired with spring bulbs and emerging perennials such as Lenten rose, (Helleborus x hyrbidus), and native ephemerals including foam flower, (Tiarella), dogtooth violet, (Erythronium), woodland phlox, (Phlox divaricata), bloodroot, (Sanguinaria), and spurge, (Euphorbia). All ferns produce fiddleheads, from which their feathery fronds unfurl, (I dare you to say that 10 times, fast). And some, such as the red-tips of the Lady Fern, (Athyrium filix feminina) ‘Lady in Red’, and the silvery fiddles of Cinnamon fern, (Osmunda cinnamomea), are quite stunning. But there is another reason for my fern-euphoria: this is tasty, tender fiddlehead harvest time!

Collecting Ostrich Fern Fiddleheads at Ferncliff

The Ostrich fern, (Matteuccia pensylvanica), and the Cinnamon fern, (Osmunda cinnamomea), are the most commonly harvested fiddleheads in the Northeast, and for good reason. These two large-sized native ferns produce the most delicious fiddleheads in the forest. If you’ve never gathered a fresh meal of fiddleheads from the woods, let me just give you a hint of what you are missing. To me, fiddleheads taste a bit like asparagus, only sweeter and more earthy. Although you can buy this gourmet treat in markets at this time of year, there is really no substitute for the taste of a hand-harvest. Fiddleheads can be eaten raw, (not advisable in great quantity due to possible health risks), but usually they are cooked. One of the easiest ways to prepare them is by cooking in a pot of boiling, salted water until tender, (7 -10 minutes for super fresh fiddleheads and slightly longer if the harvest has been refrigerated for a few days), and then serve them warm with a bit of butter. Although fiddleheads can be added to a variety of dishes, and also be preserved by pickling or freezing, one of my favorite ways to eat them is simply prepared in a Fiddlehead and Feta omelette…

Ferncliff Fiddlehead and Feta Omelette

Ferncliff Fiddlehead and Feta Omelette

Ingredients (makes one omelette)

3    medium sized fresh eggs

2    teaspoons of butter

1    handful of freshly harvested and lightly cooked fiddleheads

1/4 cup of fresh feta cheese

salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Whisk three eggs together in a small bowl with a fork, (just enough to combine the yolk and white), add salt and pepper to taste. Melt butter in an 8 inch skillet on low, (do not brown). When the foam subsides, add eggs to the pan, wait a few seconds and slowly pull the egg toward the center of the pan, (this creates a fluffy, evenly cooked omelette). Cook on medium/low, and after about a half a minute, scoot the omelette over to one side and add the feta and fiddleheads. Fold the omelette in half. Cook for another half a minute or so, (pat if you like). Turn off the heat and then place a plate over the pan and flip the omelette over. Serve with a helping of fresh blanched or steamed fiddleheads and a bit of feta crumbled on top. Delicious!

Fiddleheads and Feta: Ingredients for the Perfect Morning Omelette

Mmmmm…

Ostrich fern unfurling at Ferncliff © 2010 Michaela at TGE

Shadow of a Lady Fern © Michaela at TGE

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Words and Pictures copyright 2010 Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden. All Rights Reserved.

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Lovely Lenten Rose: The Secret Garden’s First Blossom of Springtime …

April 19th, 2010 § 4 comments § permalink

Helleborus x hybridus © Michaela at TGE

Delicate, feminine, mysterious and shy; while it’s true that these words perfectly describe the beautiful Lenten Rose, there is so much more to this gorgeous harbinger of springtime. I could just as easily describe her -much less romantically- as strong, reliable and tenacious. Helleborus x hybridus, known more often as the Lenten Rose, or the Christmas Rose in warmer climates, is the first plant to bloom in my Secret Garden in early spring. Throughout winter, her starry, leatherette-like foliage remains deep green, catching frost and snow in a most delightful way. Then, just as the Glory of the Snow and Narcissus reach their peak, the silky, speckled blossoms of Lenten Rose begin to unfurl in shades ranging from deep violet and mauve to blush pink and peachy cream…

Helleborus x hybridus © Michaela at TGE

This isn’t a bold or obvious flower, so often it can take awhile before a gardener discovers the subtle charms Lady Hellebore. This plant seems to demand a more discerning eye; a mature sensibility, if you will. However, once introduced to Helleborus, many a plant collector has developed a full-blown obsession with the genus. Easy to cultivate given the proper conditions, the Lenten Rose prefers dappled shade and  moist -but never water-logged- humus-rich, fertile soil. Special points? Deer and rodent resistance certainly top the list of her fine qualities, and she also tends to be long-lived, producing beautiful colonies beneath trees and shrubs. Although slugs and aphids can cause a bit of damage, with vigilance on the part of the gardener, these troubles are easily controlled. And although Helleborus x hybridus is sometimes listed as hardy from USDA zone 6 – 9, I have had no trouble overwintering this species here in the protected Secret Garden of my zone 4/5 garden…

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’ © Michaela at TGE – Just look at that alluring blush…

Falling in love? Tempted to add this shy beauty to your springtime collection? I know I will be including more Helleborus x hybridus cultivars to my Secret Garden collection, including a few delightful plum, black and other dark-flowered specimens. Yes, her petals may be chilly and frost covered, nipping at my finger tips as I cup them. But you know what they say: cold hands, warm heart…

Starry foliage of Helleborus x hybridus, dusted in snow, © Michaela at TGE

For further exploration of this lovely genus, I recommend Burrell and Tyler’s Hellebores: A Comprehensive Guide

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Photographs and article copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

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