September’s Most Stylish Party Goers: Fashionably Late-Season Flowers . . .

September 18th, 2013 § 4 comments § permalink

Rosa de Rescht - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comNorthern Climes can be a Challenge for Rose Lovers, but Rosa de Rescht Likes to Close Out a Party, Ending the Summer Season with a  Midnight Kiss from Jack Frost

Though sweet Summer shall stay with us a few more days, Autumn’s perfume swirls about in the chilly evening air. There’s no denying now that the seasons are about to change. This is the time of year when foliage takes center stage, but a few blossoming starlets will remain, occasionally stealing the spotlight in the late show, from now until deepest freeze. WindflowerFairy Candles, Yellow Wax BellsAsters, Bush Clover and Toad Lilies; some of my favorite flowers bloom at this time of year.

I’ve featured a few of these favorites before —or related cultivars— but as they are coming into their own again, I thought their delightful blossoms worthy of a September review. Come take a stroll and enjoy the warmth of a late summer afternoon . . .

Sweet Autumn Clematis - Clematis paniculata - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Sweet Autumn Clematis (C. paniculata/C.terniflora), Scrambles up the Trellis and Blooms to Beat the Band Beside My Studio Door

Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com She’s No Wallflower: Rudbeckia subtomentosa ‘Henry Eilers’ Dips but Never Flops at Meadow’s Edge

Late Summer Meadow Beauties - Asteracea and Solidago - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Moody Overcast of Changing Seasons Does Nothing to Dull the Beauty of Native Asters and Goldenrod, Swaying with Wooly Rush in the Meadow

Rudbeckia fulgida 'Goldsturm' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Late-Season Black-Eyed Susan, Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’ Plays Sweetly with the Low, Ruby-Glow of Heuchera Leaves

Ligularia dentata 'Britt-Marie Crawford' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comDrama-Queen Ligularia dentata ‘Britt-Marie Crawford Struts Her Deep-Maroon Satin & Gold,Feather Collar in the Secret Garden

Ligularia dentata 'Britt-Marie Crawford' in the Secret Garden. - michaela medina  harlow - thegardenerseden.com Sunshine on a Cloudy Day, Provided by Ligularia dentata ‘Britt-Marie Crawford’

Secret Garden in September - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Colorful Foliage & Flowers —Shades of Chartreuse, Lime, Burgundy and Olive— Lights Up the Mossy, Secret Garden Path and Highlight Late-Summer Through Autumn Blooms

Actaea simplex 'Hillside Black Beauty' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Fashionably Late Fairy Candles Sway in Wind Song as Summer Waltzes Toward Autumn

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Sunlit Saffron, Rose & Brilliant Bronze: Fleeting Moments of Garden Beauty…

October 25th, 2012 § Comments Off on Sunlit Saffron, Rose & Brilliant Bronze: Fleeting Moments of Garden Beauty… § permalink

A Moment’s Reflection and I’m Off to Work, Through the Secret Garden Door

My garden misses me, and I miss my garden. Autumn days are growing shorter, and with so many projects to finish before the ground freezes, I only have time to catch a glimpse of her sunlit beauty on the way to and from work. And oh, the low, golden light is so spectacular at this time of year… Don’t you wish we could bottle a bit and pull it out on one of February’s most dismal days?

So sorry for my absence, friends! Things have been a bit hectic, but I will be back soon to catch up …

Burnt Orange & Sunlit Saffron: The Blue Green Dragon is Breathing Fire at the Secret Garden Door (Acer palmatum x dissectum ‘Seiryu’)

Golden Silverbell Leaves, Scattered About the Table On A Frosty Morn

Cold Roses (Rosa de Rescht)

Secret Garden Design & Installation: Michaela Medina Harlow

Stonework by Dan Snow

Photography and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Autumn Swirls in a Dance with Winter: A Fleeting Glimpse of Frosted Fantasy …

October 27th, 2011 § 2 comments § permalink

An October Snow Squall Temporarily Coats the Scarlet Leaves of This Brilliant Viburnum with Fresh Frosting (V. plicatum var. tomentosum ‘Shasta’)

A Different Kind of October in the Secret Garden

A First For Me; Damask Roses in the Snow (‘Rosa De Rescht’)

Candy-Coated Autumn Colors …

And Jewel-Like Leaves, Flash Frozen in Time

Snow Kissed Hydrangea: Could There Be a Prettier, More Poetic, Late-Autumn Scene? (H. paniculata ‘Limelight’)

Snow Mixed with Fruity Colors: A Most Delightful, Frosted Confection

Blood Red Japanese Maple Leaves (Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’) Remind Me of That Bombshell-Classic Lipstick: Cherries in the Snow

The Beauty of Two Seasons, Blurred into One

Snow Softly Covers Cinderella’s Pumpkin as She Readies for the Icicle Ball …

And the Dahlias Bow as They Take Their Last Dance 

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions) are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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Seduced by Autumn’s Alluring Scent …

September 25th, 2011 § Comments Off on Seduced by Autumn’s Alluring Scent … § permalink

Deep Within the Secret Garden, the Delightful Scent of Fairy Candles (Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ and ‘Brunette’ aka Cimicifuga racemosa) Perfumes the Air, Luring Me Down the Dim, Winding Path. (Other plants here: Acer palmatum x dissectum ‘Seiryu’, Daphne x burkwoodii ‘Carol Mackie’, Viburum bodnantense ‘Dawn’, and beside the Actaea simplex: glowing, chartreuse Hakonechloa macra ‘All Gold’)

There are many things to love about Autumn, not the least of which is her enviable wardrobe of fine perfume. Earthy notes of musk, moss and damp leaves play against heady florals to create a most alluring bouquet. Just outside my studio door, Sweet Autumn Clematis (Clematis paniculata, aka C. terniflora) scents the damp morning breeze with a cloud of fragrant white blossoms. Nearby —along the edge of the stone terrace— swoon-inducing Damask Roses (Hardy Portland Damask cultivar, Rosa ‘De Rescht’) fill the air with their unmistakably rich scent as they come into a second wave of seasonal bloom; mingling with the nearby vanilla of Henry Eilers Sweet Coneflower (Rudbeckia subtomentosa ‘Henry Eilers’). Further down the garden path —luring me into the shadows— the slightly-fruity fragrance Fairy Candles (Actaea simplex cvs ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ and ‘Brunette’) swirls about, blending at the edge of the damp walls with base notes of moss and fern to balance the sweetness …

One of the lofty delights of fall, Sweet Autumn Clematis (Clematis paniculata, aka C. terniflora) twines about my studio entry door. Here in my zone 4/5 garden, this old-time favorite produces clouds of fragrant, white blossoms throughout the month of September and often into early October. Sweet Autumn Clematis is hardy in zones 4-8 and can reach a height of 30′ or more (easily contained and kept tidy by vigorous spring pruning, as this clematis blooms on new wood)

The old roses, particularly Damasks, are well known for their exquisite perfume. In early autumn —and often straight through the first frost— this Portland Damask Rose known as Rosa ‘De Rescht’ (the right rose, in German), is particularly sweet. Read more about this hardy cultivar and find a Vintage Rose Cocktail recipe by clicking here.

An unusually fragrant rudbeckia, Henry Eilers Sweet Coneflower (Rudbeckia subtomentosa ‘Henry Eilers’), lightly perfumes the air with the subtle scent of vanilla, when planted en masse

The Fruity Scent of Fairy Candles (Actaea simplex ‘Brunette’) Wafts Up from the Stone Walls Along the Secret Garden Path. Read more about this Autumn blooming beauty by clicking here.

Late-blooming flowers are not only attractive, but vitally important to the support of pollinators as well. As sunlight fades in the September garden, I often find drunken bees and butterflies lingering about the Fairy Candles and other blossoms, long past the sunset. And can you blame them? With all the voluptuous fragrances of fall —and many more yet to come— a stroll through the Autumn garden can be a deliciously intoxicating experience …

Find the recipe for this Vintage Rose Cocktail and read about my favorite Autumn Damask Rose, ‘Rosa De Rescht’ by clicking here

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photos, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions) are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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Stopping to Smell the Roses …

July 1st, 2011 § 4 comments § permalink

From Garden to Desktop: Rosa Bibi Maizoon & Rosa De Rescht in a Porcelain Vase by Heidi Loewen

When I glanced at my calendar this morning, I could hardly believe my eyes. July 1st already? It seems impossible, but here in the States, the long Fourth of July weekend —filled with picnics, marching bands, parades and fireworks— is upon us!  My schedule has been so jam packed with projects and deadlines, I feel as if the summer —only just begun— is already blowing by.

Wait, wait … Remember to stop and smell the roses!

When I find myself getting too caught up in the day to day, I look to the natural world to restore my sense of balance. A stroll through the the luxuriously fragrant garden at dawn, or a walk along the river at twilight —filled with graceful swans and fuzzy ducklings— always seems to set me right …

Female Mallard Duck and Her Ducklings

Swans on the River at Twilight

Fresh Cut Roses from the Garden

Beautiful porcelain vase at top is by New Mexico artist Heidi Loewen

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, articles and content on this site, (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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Dreams on a Midsummer Night’s Eve & Fragrant Bouquets Beneath Pillows…

June 23rd, 2010 § 1 comment § permalink

A Midsummer Night’s Bouquet for Beneath the Pillow ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

“I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,

Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,

Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine,

With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine.”

– William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act ii, Scene 1

Gathering the Ingredients for a Midsummer Night’s Dream…

Tonight is Midsummer Eve, originally a pagan holiday celebrating the Summer Solstice and fertility. In Scandinavia, it is traditional for young women to gather bouquets of flowers, (herbal blossoms of seven different species, according to some sources), and place them beneath their pillows before bedtime. According to legend, if a maiden falls asleep on Midsummer Night with blossoms tucked beneath her pillow, she will dream of her future husband…

Calendula – Flora von Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz 1885, Gera, Germany

With these kinds of stakes in mind, I would suggest choosing your bouquet wisely. For sound sleep I would include fragrant valerian (Valeriana officinalis) and perhaps some other flowering, traditional mid-summer herbs; particularly mythical marigold (Calendula officinalis), lavender, (Lavandula dentata), bergamot, (Monarda didyama), sage, (Salvia officinalis), thyme, (Thymus), and of course a red rose, (Rosa) for passion – just be sure to cut off the thorns!

Blossoming, fragrant sage, (Salvia officinalis) ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

Two of the herbal flowers I’ve chosen for beneath my pillow tonight: Valeriana officinalis and Rosa de Rescht ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

Sweet Dreams Ladies…

Today is also known as St. John’s Eve. St. John is the patron saint of beekeepers! To learn more about this day in history, I recommend visiting the Writer’s Almanac June 23 page, (you will have to hit the Prev. button if you are reading this after June 23rd), with Garrison Kiellor (then click on the audio link at the top of the page).

***

Article and photographs © 2010 Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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Bringing Nature’s Beauty Indoors: Clustered Vases Beside the Laptop…

June 4th, 2010 § 2 comments § permalink

Clustered vases filled with Lupine, Phlox, Valerian, and Rosa de Rescht. Photo © 2010 Michaela at TGE

Whew. It has been busy around here. Most days I am out and about in the field working with clients, gathering plants, making deliveries, planting gardens, and lately, helping out my friends at Walker Farm on the weekends by answering customer questions about trees, shrubs and perennials. But at least one day a week, I remain here at my home studio where I research new plant cultivars, draw up garden design plans and plant lists, and yes, write this blog as well as a weekly Wednesday post for Barnes and Noble’s Garden Variety. Some days I even find time to work in my own garden, or at least to pick a few flowers…

The home “office”

Right now my garden is a voluptuous tumble of color and fragrance. The long beds and borders are overflowing with indigo-hued baptisia, lupine, heaven-scented peonies, old-fashioned roses, wild phlox, delicate valerian, bluebells, romantic, wine-red weigela, and the list goes on. Sweet springtime! Oh how I wish I could bottle up all of the beauty and fragrance and save it for a blustery January day… But we all know that’s not possible, so I try to squeeze in every precious moment while I can. Sometimes that means snipping a rose here, and a handful of storm-damaged lupine there, to create a little table-top vignette. Over the years I have received many beautiful vases as birthday, thank you and hostess gifts from family, friends and clients. I love selecting vessels in a variety of sizes, shapes and colors, to cluster on a table top, nightstand, or beside my laptop while I work. If I can’t be out in the garden, I might as well bring it, and all of its rosy splendor, indoors with me while I work.

Do you enjoy fresh cut flowers as much as I do? Try clustering a group of vases together to create a tiny garden atmosphere indoors. I like groups of 3, 5 or 7 vases, ranging from bud to bouquet in size. Vary the opacity and patterns to compliment the flowers you select. This time I chose light, greenish-turquoise tones to emphasize the cerise hues of Rosa de Rescht and two-toned pink lupine. Vases needn’t be expensive! Old glass soda bottles, spice or jam jars, tin cans and a variety of recycled containers make charming, impromptu vessels…

Rosa de Rescht, up close in a bud vase where I can enjoy her gorgeous fragrance and work at the same time…

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Article and photographs © 2010 Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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The Sweet, Seductive Power of Scent: Garden Fragrance…

May 31st, 2010 § 2 comments § permalink

Lily of the Valley, (Convallaria majalis), fills my bedroom with a fresh, green scent…

“Smells  are  surer  than  sounds  and  sights  to  make  the  heartstrings  crack” ……………………………………………………………………- –………………………………………………………………………….rudyard kipling

Imagine stepping outside and into the garden on a warm spring evening. Close your eyes and breathe deep. Does the air smell sweet? Are you drawn down a winding path, lined by flickering shadows; lured deeper by the faintest whiff of perfume? What is that elusive fragrance drifting this way and that? White lilac? Fresh lily-of-the-valley? The lingering scent of a first rose?

Our sense of smell is powerful -directly linked to memory and emotion- and as gardeners, fragrance is one of our most seductive design tools. Delicately sweet mockorange beside the screen porch, spicy viburnum outside the bedroom window, and lavender edging the dining terrace; when fragrant plants are placed near doors and windows, they have a way of luring us outside. And have you noticed how roses, warmed by the afternoon sun, can literally stop you in your tracks, even on the busiest of days? I pay attention to smell when I am designing gardens and shopping for plants -even when they aren’t blooming- never underestimating the olfactory power of foliage. Herbs, such as rosemary and mint for example, as well as many deciduous shrubs and evergreens, add delightful fragrance to the air when brushed or stirred. When I’m out weeding in my front garden, the thyme planted between the stones in my walkway releases a delicious lemony scent, rewarding me each time I haul away a basket of debris.

The months of May and June seem particularly heady, filled with some of the most beautiful and nostalgic garden fragrances. I have collected a few of my springtime favorites, and I’d love to hear about yours…

Folded promise of potent fragrance to come – Rosa rugosa in bud…

Spicy and sweet, this favorite combination makes Rosa de Rescht a much anticipated flower in my garden…

David Austin English Rose, Rosa ‘Bibi Maizoon’ -a voluptuous beauty beyond compare- possesses the kind of old-fashioned fragrance I covet and fuss over every year…

Wild woodland phlox, (Phlox divaricata ‘Clouds of Perfume’ )- this free seeding beauty lures me straight down the garden path in the still of early morning, filling the air with it’s delicate, powdery fragrance..

Fragrant abelia, (Abelia mosanensis), blooms late May through early June, and you have to smell it to believe it. I’d tape a bunch to my nose if I could get away with it…

Abelia mosanensis, sweetly fragrant with a touch of spicy clove

Fragrant tree peony, (Paeonia moutan x lutea, an  American hybrid (1952),  ‘High Noon’ )- Peonies of all kinds bring beautiful fragrance to the garden, and tree peonies possess some of the more exotic scents…

Tazetta-type daffodils are some of the most fragrant springtime bulbs…

Fragrant Star Azalea, (Deciduous Rhododendron atlanticum x canescens ‘Fragrant Star’), fills the air with a gorgeous, musky and exotic scent, and she possesses a beautiful form to match her perfume…

Rhododendron prinophyllum, our intensely fragrant native roseshell azalea, has a decidedly clove-like scent…

Powerfully fragrant, double white lilac, (Syringa vulgaris ‘Mme. Lemoine’), is the only white lilac for me…

Korean spicebush, (Viburnum carlesii), and many other viburnum are prized for their uniquely spicy, highly alluring fragrance…

One tiny sprig of variegated daphne,(Daphne x burkwoodi ‘Carol Mackie’),  floating in a shallow bowl is enough to scent an entire room…

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Article and photographs © 2010 Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

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A Vintage Rose Cocktail to Celebrate The Last Day of Summer…

September 20th, 2009 § 1 comment § permalink

Vintage Rose Cocktail from The Bubbly Girl – Photo ⓒ Michaela at TGE

We may be kissing Summer a sweet goodbye on Tuesday, but you didn’t think I would let her slip away for the year without a little celebration, now did you?  Of course not. She is far too loved to be easily forgotten. As I was strolling around my garden the other evening, dreaming up a suitable send-off for our beloved season, a sweet answer came to me on the breeze: Rosa ‘De Rescht’. Sometimes inspiration strikes like a bolt from the blue. I sprang to action…

If you have been following my journal entries for awhile, you may recall that back in early July I mentioned a new late-night hobby, (devouring food blogs), in my post, “Stop! Put down that hoe, and let’s eat”. Well, as the weeks passed my newfound interest in cooking, and the vibrant online community of foodies, led me to a few intriguing wine blogs. While some of these websites turned out to be bit dry and formal, I recently made a more effervescent discovery. A few weeks ago, I chanced upon Bubbly Girl, a wonderful website and blog written by Maria Hunt. Maria’s lovely book, The Bubbly Bar, is a collection of cocktail recipes made with champagne and sparkling wine. Many of her beautiful and festive drinks use fresh ingredients, including berries, herbs, fruit, and my personal favorite, flowers! While visiting Maria’s blog, I discovered several cocktails calling for rose petals and/or rose water. In fact, her Moonwalk Cocktail, and her signature Love in the Afternoon, (featured on the cover of the book), both contain rose water, among other ingredients. Everything on her website looked delightful, but when I stumbled upon Maria’s recipe for a Vintage Rose Cocktail, I knew I just had to try it. Unfortunately, with autumn’s first frost right around the corner, time was running out. By the time I found this recipe, the last day of summer was less than a week away. In order to share this with you, I had to move quick. So after taste-testing this delicious, rose-bubble potion, (you can not imagine the sacrifices I make for this blog), I wrote Maria a quick email explaining how I thought my readers might appreciate her rose-infused champagne cocktail, and asking permission to reprint her recipe. Maria graciously responded with a warm and generous note, kindly offering to share. What a lovely, talented lady. Thank you Maria!

No doubt, many of you have an ample supply of roses. But it is getting late in the season, and some of you may need to borrow a few petals from a friend, or pay a visit to your local florist in order to make this drink, (carefully read the recipe below for other key ingredients). Fortunately, the antique Damask roses in my garden have decided to provide me with the key ingredient, (petals), by producing a last wave of late-season, heavenly-scented bloom, (remember that bolt from the blue inspiration I mentioned above?). In fact just yesterday, I brought several deep fuchsia rose blossoms up to the table beside my bed in order to revel in their fragrance for a few more nights. I will miss them. After reading Maria’s recipe, it seemed more than appropriate to harvest some fresh petals from this, my Portland Damask, Rosa ‘De Rescht’, in order to create a special cocktail marking the Last Day of Summer, Monday, September 21st, 2009.

I hope you will enjoy the Vintage Rose Cocktail, and beautiful memories of summer, for many years to come…

So Long Sweet Summer. We’ll see you again next year. Cheers!

rose-infused simple syrupHomemade Rose-Lavender infused Simple Syrup – Photo ⓒ Michaela at TGE

Vintage Rose Cocktail

From the Bubbly Girl, Maria Hunt

Ingredients (makes one cocktail):


3/4 ounce rose syrup *

4 – 5 ounces chilled sparkling wine or champagne **

lemon twist, (Meyer if possible)

organic rose petals (we used fresh petals from Rosa ‘De Rescht’)

Directions:

Add the rose syrup to a chilled champagne flute. Top with sparkling wine or champagne. Twist the lemon peel over the glass to release the oils and then drop it into the flute. Garnish with fresh, organic rose petals…

Cheers !

.

Some additional notes from The Gardner’s Eden:

*You can buy rose syrup at many specialty stores, however we made our own:

.

To make rose syrup: mix 1/2 cup of rose flower water, (dilute with water if necessary), with several sprigs of French lavender, and the fresh petals of one organically grown rose, (we used damask Rosa ‘De Rescht’, see cultivar notes below). bring to a quick boil in a small sauce pan, slowly adding 1 cup of sugar. simmer for 5-8 minutes to thicken, (you may add a couple of drops of organic red food coloring if you so desire). remove from heat. Strain through a filter to remove herbs. Allow syrup to cool, or chill in your fridge. Seal in a small bottle and store refrigerated for approximately 2 weeks. (This recipe may be doubled)

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** I also made this drink as a “mock-tail” for a friend. Use a good quality, non-alcoholic sparkling wine to replace the champagne, (available in many specialty stores and online).

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Rosa 'De Rescht' Portland Damask Perpetual:Repeat flush of bloom 3.5'highx 3' wide, pure, intense sweet Damask scent, hardy zone 4 (protected)-8Petals of Rosa ‘De Rescht’, an Antique Portland Damask Rose ⓒ Michaela at TGE

And now, a few notes regarding the source of our chosen ingredient, the petals of Rosa ‘De Rescht’  …

Star of the summer to autumn transition in my entry garden, the scent of Rosa ‘De Rescht’ has stopped many a guest in their tracks. She is classified as a Portland Damask rose, and her tidy growth habit is quite similar to a Gallica. Although her complete history was lost and remains unknown, this antique rose was reintroduced to the west in the mid-1940’s when she was ‘discovered’ by an English woman traveling in Persia, (now modern Iran). The family lines of this mysterious rose have been traced back more than one hundred years, although her exact lineage is unclear. I have always been intrigued by a lady with a bit of a past, haven’t you? Damask roses are known to have some of the finest fragrance in the entire rose genus. The oil and water of the Damask are key ingredients in many fine perfumes and cosmetics. Of course there are many fragrant Damask roses, but to my nose, this one is truly exceptional. As an added bonus, Portland Damasks, (also known as perpetuals), are reliable repeat bloomers. In my garden, Rosa ‘De Rescht’  is in the habit of producing several waves of flower, (especially when I remember to deadhead), pausing just long enough between blooming cycles to make her absence felt. She likes to finish the season with a grand finale, brushing us with a kiss of sweet fragrance on the final days of summer, just before the frost. Rosa ‘De Rescht’ has gorgeous, deep fuchsia buds and a classic, old-fashioned pompon flower. Clearly she has become one of my favorites. Yes, it does help that this rosebush is easy going and reasonably sized, (3.5′ high by 3′ wide), making her a fine addition to the perennial border. And unlike many antique roses, Rosa ‘De Rescht’ still remembers her good breeding and remains very well mannered; she doesn’t sucker, or threaten to encroach upon the rest of the garden. She has dignity. Grace. The foliage and wood of this cultivar has proven relatively disease free, and quite hardy in my garden. Although Rosa ‘De Rescht’  is listed as USDA zones 5-8, in my experience she is much sturdier. I live at the edge of zone 4, (and Ferncliff is an exposed, rugged site), where she has performed very well for the past 5 years without any winter protection at all. I think she is quite happy here, and I am more than delighted to be rewarded with her deliciously fragrant petals…

Rosa 'De Rescht'Rosa ‘De Rescht’, a Portland Damask Rose at Ferncliff ⓒ Michaela at TGE

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~ Vintage Rose Cocktail Recipe, courtesy of The Bubbly Girl, Maria Hunt ~

Maria’s book, (pictured below), would make a lovely gift…

bubbly_bar_cover-largeYou can buy Maria’s book, The Bubbly Bar, by clicking here.

Thank you Maria … Cheers !

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Article and Photographs copyright 2009 – Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

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