A Time for Gathering Friends & Family, Harvest Dinners & Giving Thanks…

November 25th, 2010 § 2 comments § permalink

Happy Thanksgiving !

In this season of giving thanks, I would like to express my gratitude to all of you for following The Gardener’s Eden. Thank you for  your many delightful comments and email correspondence, and thank you for sharing this site with your friends. I truly love hearing from you, both here on the site, and also on The Gardener’s Eden’s Facebook and Twitter pages. I am so grateful for the many wonderful, new friendships growing from this lovely garden online. It takes time and care to build friendships, just as it takes time and care to build gardens. Thank you for joining me here.

Thank you to Tim Geiss, friend, photographer and IT wiz-beyond-compare. Without you, Tim, this blog would not exist, and I am ever-grateful for your your technical expertise, assistance, and all of your generous help. And thank you for sharing your amazing photographs —many taken specifically for this site— throughout the year. I also want to thank John Miller at The Old School House Plantery, for your wonderful contributions as guest blogger, and Ted Dillard, for your fantastic photography tips and your recent article on Electric Gardening!

I’ve made some wonderful connections through The Gardener’s Eden over the past year and a half, and I am deeply grateful for those new friendships. Thank you to Guillermo at The Honeybee Conservancy, for your enthusiasm and encouragement over the past year -it has been a pleasure working with you. And thank you to Kristin Zimmerman. Kristin, I had so much fun working with you at Barnes & Noble’s Garden Variety , and although I hope you are enjoying your new job, I want you to know that I am already missing you, your careful editing and our weekly email exchanges. And a great, big, heart-felt thank you to Stacey Hirvela and Miranda Van Gelder at Martha Stewart Living’s At Home in the Garden and Martha Stewart Living Magazine for extending a hand across this virtual, online gardening community. Thank you for opening the door to such unexpected and exciting opportunities.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Have a Lovely Holiday Weekend Everyone!

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Article & Photographs ⓒ 2010 Michaela at TGE

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The Electric Gardener: Guest Post by Ted Dillard of The Electric Chronicles…

October 18th, 2010 § 3 comments § permalink

“Get that evil, oily, smelly, loud machine out of my garden!”  This was the response I got from a dear friend and gardener, as I pointed my 1967 Gravely tractor with the “Power Plow” attachment –– a tool that can only be described as a food processor for soil–– towards the task of turning her vegetable garden one spring. Here, I thought I was being such a nice guy. She was a soil-studies major at the University of Maine, and lord help you if you called it “dirt”. My friend’s contention that the grease, oil and airborne pollutants coming out of my venerable old tractor is bad for her plants is far from unfounded. Small engines have virtually no anti-pollution and emission controls required. As a result, “A 2001 study showed that some mowers emit the same amount of pollution (emissions other than carbon dioxide) in one hour as driving a 1992 model car for 650 miles (1,050 km).[10]. Another estimate puts the amount of pollution from a lawn mower at four times the amount from a car, per hour” (from Wikipedia) – not to mention the noise.

So what are the alternatives when power tools are necessary in the garden? The mower above was found on Craigslist for free – a little electric mower that wore out its batteries.  I picked it up and tossed some of my old scooter batteries in, and voila- I’d saved the thing from the landfill, used my old scooter batteries for something worthwhile, and got myself a cordless electric lawnmower.  This got me to thinking —I know, a dangerous thing— how much of a normal compliment of yard and garden equipment could be electric, or could be converted to electric?  I’ve been using a corded electric lawnmover and weedwacker for years. From the perspective of noise-control alone, it’s a wonderful alternative. An electric lawnmower simply makes a whirring sound, and depending on how close your neighbors live, you can run it in the early hours of a weekend morning with no fear of waking the entire neighborhood. For a small lawn or garden, and with a little practice and observance of the prime rule of electric corded lawnmowing (always turn the handle towards the cord source, never away), it’s a perfect solution. You don’t get how much the smog coming out of a mower affects you —personally— until you use an electric machine, and begin to notice that you can breathe, your ears don’t ring and your clothes don’t stink.

But what else is out there? A simple search for “electric garden tools” reveals a staggering array of stuff: from lawn mowers and string trimmers right on up to electric chippers, log splitters, chain sawsrototillers, and the list goes on. Many of the tools are for a small urban or suburban lawn or garden, and some of them are pretty robust. Most of the big tools are corded, so you’re limited to using them within 100 feet or so of your outlet, and this does take some getting used to. But, hearing the birds singing while you’re mowing the grass is —well, to coin a phrase— priceless! Battery powered tools are also an option, and in terms of charging, solar kits are getting remarkably affordable – so are wind turbines.  And, the stuff can be bought at places like Northern Tool.

Interested in further exploring the possibilities of electric power tools, battery charging systems and other environmentally-friendly garden and home solutions? For more information and specifics on solar, wind and battery technology (and electric motorcycles too!), visit Ted Dillard’s awesome blog, The Electric Chronicles, for more details.

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Article excerpt and photo at top ⓒ 2010 Ted Dillard

Thank you Ted Dillard !

All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used or reproduced without prior written consent. Inspired by something you see here? Great! Please give credit where credit is due. It’s a small world and link-love makes for fond friendships. Stealing makes for bad dreams…

Do you enjoy visiting The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through our affiliate links. A small percentage of any sale originating from The Gardener’s Eden will go toward web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you for your support!

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