The Sublime Beauty of Spring Twilight & Melancholy Song of the Hermit Thrush…

April 16th, 2012 § 3 comments § permalink

Swollen Buds of Viburnum x burkwoodii ‘Mohawk’ in Silhouette Against the Sublime Beauty of Spring Twilight

The melancholy song of the hermit thrush —rising and falling; a flute amongst the hemlock boughs of moody twilight— is a sound I eagerly anticipate each spring. As soon as winter’s ice begins to recede and the scent of warm earth bubbles up from melting snow, I begin to long for the thrush’s familiar trill in the forest.

If you know the sweet sadness expressed by this shy, cinnamon-colored bird, you will likely agree that it’s near impossible to describe. And yet, to me, the song of the hermit thrush captures the fleeting beauty of time better than words could ever express. Summer is coming, and every year the seasons seem to pass quicker; racing forward like a fast moving stream, strewn with springtime petals and chased by musky autumn leaves.

The Sound of April Twilight: Click Here to Listen to the Hermit Thrush’s Song & Explore Other Birdsong at Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Interactive Website

Travel back to a previous post on woodland wildflowers, songbirds and the ephemeral beauty of springtime, by clicking here.

Photographs and Text ⓒ Michaela Medina for The Gardener’s Eden. All photos, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions) are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Thank you!

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Nesting Plans…

March 15th, 2011 § 4 comments § permalink

Nest Photograph ⓒ  Tim Geiss at Poltergeiss

Chirping, cawing, calling and singing; suddenly, the forest has come alive with the sound of migratory birds. Soon, it will be nesting time and you know what they say: the early bird catches the best real estate. OK, so maybe that’s not quite what they say, but Cornell Lab of Ornithology does advise backyard birders to begin placing their nest boxes in February (warmer climates) and March (cold climates like mine). So, I like to get my rental units ready early, to attract as many spring and summer tenants as possible. Birds provide beauty and entertainment in my garden —to be sure— but my feathered friends also play a key role in natural insect control. I prefer to take advantage of this free service that nature provides for us, rather than use potentially hazardous, unnatural and expensive substances to control insect pests in my garden.

Finding the right house for both bird and landscape is important. I’ve found some really pretty, functional options amongst the ever-changing selection available at Terrain online (image courtesy Terrain).

When it comes to nesting boxes and bird houses, all species have different preferences and requirements. Cornell Lab of Ornithology is a great source of information, and you can find tips on what kind of bird house you will need and how to place it to attract a specific species (like say, a bluebird) by visiting this page on their site, linked here. Online retailers like Duncraft provide excellent pre-made birdhouses and kits for backyard bird enthusiasts, and I recently found some very stylish avian homes at Terrain, pictured below. So get out your feather duster and your screw gun, it’s time to ready the real estate!

Terrain’s Weathered Birdbarn $28.95

Nest in Hemlock Boughs. Photograph ⓒ Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden

Terrain’s Thatched Roof Nest House $24.00

Tufted Titmouse  ⓒ  Tim Geiss at Poltergeiss

Learning to identify and protect backyard birds helps kids develop a respect and greater understanding of the natural world and balance of our shared ecosystem. Read more about the Tufted Titmouse and listen to its echoing and distinctive voice here at Cornell Lab of Ornithology. And please share the link with a child you know.

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Thank you to Tim Geiss for his beautiful bird and nest photos.

Birdhouse photos are courtesy Terrain.

Article and photo as noted are copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

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The Living Garden: Crow Feasting Upon Staghorn Sumac Berries…

March 13th, 2011 § Comments Off on The Living Garden: Crow Feasting Upon Staghorn Sumac Berries… § permalink

Crows feasting upon native staghorn sumac berries (Rhus typhina) in my garden this morning…

This morning while lingering over my breakfast, I heard some loud caw-caw-cawing coming from the edge of the back garden, and then noticed a pair of American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) enjoying an early meal of fruit from staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina). With its velvety branches, brilliant fall color and bright red fruits, North American native Rhus typhina will always be high on my list of favorite four-season shrubs (read my detailed plant-profile post about this under-appreciated plant here). And beyond its value as a large-scale, landscape ornamental, sumac is an important source of food for birds and other wildlife. In late winter and early sping —when natural sources of sustenance are becoming depleted— sumac fruit and seed provides food for many returning and over-wintering birds; including crow, raven, robin, thrush, cardinals, vireos, catbirds, warblers, juncos, grouse and others.

Interested in learning more about how to attract birds to your yard with landscaping? Cornell Lab of Ornithology has a great site called All About Birds, with all sorts of great tips and resources. I love their free and easy to use sound-library and identification guides. Living here in the wilds of Vermont (happily without television reception) bird and wildlife watching is one of my main forms of visual entertainment, and I am particularly fond of the dark, beautiful and intelligent crow and raven. Click here to listen to the call sounds of the American Crow and take a tour of the fantastic Cornell Lab of Ornithology website.

Staghorn sumac fruits (Rhus typhina) persist through winter, offering sustenance to hungry over-wintering and migratory birds.

Read more about Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) here.

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Article and photographs are copyright Michaela at The Gardener’s Eden, all rights reserved. All content on this site, (with noted exceptions), is the property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be used, reproduced or reposted elsewhere without written consent.

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