Aerial Landscape Prints Now Available

November 20th, 2013 Comments Off

Connecticut River, Autumn - copyright 2013 - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Connecticut River, Early Autumn 

I am now offering select, archival-quality prints, suitable for framing, from my recent October Kaleidoscope aerial series (click here), and the Days of Late Summer aerial series (click here), available for purchase online. Print prices vary by size (8″ x 12″ on up to 16″ x 24″), starting at $55 (shipping is included, within the continental U.S.). Not all photographs are currently available in all sizes, but more images, sizes and options are coming!

Soon, I will have a page at left dedicated to print orders (both photographs and artwork), but for now, if you are interested in purchasing a print, please send me an email here, and I will take your order personally. All major forms of payment are accepted via Paypal. Please allow two to three weeks for printing and shipping of special orders.

Photography & Textⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, artwork, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of Michaela Medina Harlow and/or The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you!

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Dusky Pink Twilight & Golden Moonrise

November 16th, 2013 Comments Off

November's Full Beaver Moon - copyright 2013 - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com November’s Full Beaver Moon Rises Through Tangled Beech Branches 

Late autumn is often a spectacular season for sky watching, and this year did not disappoint. How fortunate to have cloudless skies for both October and November’s full moonrise. With milder temperatures returning to New England this week, I spent Saturday outside, wandering about my garden in short shirtsleeves. Looks like autumn has extended us yet another reprieve before the cold months of winter settle in. Migratory birds continue to pass through my woodland, gathering sustenance from nuts, seeds and berries, before heading south on their seasonal trek.

In anticipation of November’s full, Beaver Moon (also called the Frosty Moon), I set my table for dinner out on the stone terrace this evening, and watched as the sky grew dusky pink. With twilight settling in the forest, Barred Owls began to cackle and Eastern Coyotes struck up their evening song. And then, glimmering gold beyond bare beech branches, the beautiful, full moon rose. Rain is forecast for tomorrow, throughout much of New England, but if skies are clear where you are, the moon will appear full again on Sunday, November 17th. Learn more about how the full moons came to be known by such interesting names by visiting this great article on Space.com.

Departures - copyright 2013 - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com A Flock of Grackles Takes Noisy Flight at First Light After Feasting Upon a Breakfast of Beechnuts in the Forest. Read More About the Grackle and Listen to the Sound of a Flock, Here at Cornell’s All About Birds

Autumn Moonlight Through the Bare Branched Forest - copyright 2013 - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com November’s Dramatic, Month-Long Celestial Show has been Spectacular this Year. 

Photography & Textⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, artwork, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of Michaela Medina Harlow and/or The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you!

Do you enjoy The Gardener’s Eden? You can help support this site by shopping through affiliate links. A small percentage of each sale will be paid to this site, helping to cover web hosting and maintenance costs. Thank you so much for your support!

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Upon a Winter-Kissed, Autumn Day: Magical, First Snowfall in the Garden . . .

November 9th, 2013 Comments Off

Secret Garden, First Snowfall - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com A Snow-Kissed, November Morning Surprise in the Secret Garden

November is an unpredictable month; nebulous skies shifting with blue-grey mystery. One moment the forest is flooded with warm light and the next, swept up in a chill. The first snow fell here yesterday —dusting the garden in a pretty swirl of lacy white — and the balmy days of October are but a beautiful, fading memory.

Helleborus x hybridus and Hakonechloa macra in the Secret Garden - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Frosted, Starry Helleborus x hybridus Leaves & Winter Blond Hakonechloa macra in the Secret Garden

I’ve a few more garden chores to finish up this month, but with few exceptions, cutting back perennials is not on my list. No, there’s too much charm to be found in a candle-lit, winter garden to let a case of über-tidiness ruin the show. After freezing fog and icy mist settle on a cold autumn night, a morning walk through the crystalline borders is pure, diamond-dust-delight. I prefer to enjoy the frozen blowziness of tufts, tassels and wayward strands throughout the winter, and so, set the shears aside ’till early spring . . .

Snow-Dusted Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis 'Morning Light') - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Evocative of Fine Venetian Lace, the Garden’s Delicate Textures, Traced in Snow White 

Secret Garden Steps with Snow - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Secret Garden Steps, Dotted with Minty Green and Chocolate Brown, then Sprinkled in Confectioner’s Sugar

Autumn Leaves and Snow - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Swirling Sangria-Hued Leaves Mix with White, Wind-Driven Snow in the Garden (Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’, Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’, Juniperus chinensis ‘Sargentii’)

November Snow Squall in the Garden - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Mixed Border —Packed with Fruiting Shrubs, Still-Standing Perennials and Ornamental Grasses— Whips About Wildly in the November Wind. Why Surrender the Beauty too Soon? Set Aside the Shears and Sit Back with a Warm Cup of Mulled Cider.

Tea Viburnum Fruits (Viburnum setigerum) with Snow - michaela medina harlowTea Viburnum Fruits Swing, Radiant as Ruby Chandeliers from Snow-Dusted Branches (Viburnum setigerum)

Siberian Cypress -Microbiota decussata with snow -michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Siberian Cypress (Microbiota decussata) and Wooly Thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) on the North Ridge Path

Flame Grass - Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens with snow in November - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Bittersweet Strands of White-Tufted Flame Grass Dance Agains the Blue-Green Curtain of Conifers (Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens)

Birch Trees in Snow Squall - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Pretty, White, Vertical Lines of Paper Birch Carry the Eye Up and Onward, Through the Snow-Swirled Rusty-Grey Hills

Photography & Textⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, artwork, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of Michaela Medina Harlow and/or The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you!

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Burnished Bronze & Jewel Tones: November Light in the Garden . . .

November 7th, 2013 Comments Off

Secret Garden in Late October - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Stepping into Late Autumn, Through the Secret Garden Door

Jack Frost arrived a bit late to the garden this year, and so far, he’s breezed through only lightly. Though the calendar says it’s November, Black-eyed Susan and her pretty, pink Wind-Flower companions have thus far eluded his fatal kiss. The maples have all shed their leaves, but oak, beech and poplar trees continue to add confetti dots of color to the hills. Here in the garden, the ornamental grasses reign supreme, but Korean Dogwood (Cornus kousa) and Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum), as well as many Viburnum, Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius), Witch Alder (Fothergilla), and other species hold tight to pretty red-orange foliage and brightly colored berries. Still, I remind myself daily to savor this last great wave of color. Days are getting shorter and nights are getting colder. Soon the garden and surrounding forest will stand naked, shivering in white, winter bones.

Before the November Wind - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com  A Garden Trio of Cranberrybush Viburnum, Maiden Grass and Limelight Hydrangea Vie with Blushing Sunset for an Autumn Evening Spotlight

Miscanthus sinensis in the Entry Garden - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comJPG And Rounding the Corner on the Opposite Side, Creeping Blue-Rug Juinper (Juniperus horizontalis ‘Wiltonii’), Striped Eulalia Grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’) and Variegated Wayfaring Tree (Viburnum lantana ‘Variegatus’), Add Complimentary Color and Textural Contrast to the Fiery Hues

Switch Grass Turns Gold (Panicum virgatum 'Heavy Metal') - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Autumnal Gold of Switch Grass (Panicum virgatum ‘Heavy Metal’) Plays Pretty Against the Maroon Backdrop of Diablo Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’)

Callicarpa dichotoma 'Early Amethyst' with Rudbeckia hirta and Amsonia hubrichtii - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Beautyberry (Callicarpa dichotoma ‘Issai’) and Hubricht’s Amsonia (Amsonia hubrichtii) Shine Bright as the Sun’s Afterglow 

Callicarpa-dichotoma-with-Cotinus-coggygria-and-Miscanthus Early Amethyst Beautyberry (Callicarpa dichotoma ‘Early Amethyst’) with Smoke Bush (Cotinus coggygria ‘Royal Purple’) and Fountain Grass (Pennisetum alopecuroides), in the Entry Garden Walk

Moody Morning in the Autumn Garden Miscanthus sinensis cultivars - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Striped Eulalia Grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’) with Flame Grass (Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens) on a Dramatic, November Day

Pennisetum alopecuroides 'Hameln' in autumn - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Fountain Grass (Pennisetum alopecuroides) Tufts Lend an Air of Soft Warmth to a Cold, Autumn Day 

Secret Garden Door and Water Bowl in November (Acer palmatum x dissectum 'Seiryu')- michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Blue-Green Dragon (Acer palmatum x dissectum ‘Seiryu’) Breathes Fire at the Secret Garden Door on a November Day

Photography & Textⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, artwork, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of Michaela Medina Harlow and/or The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Bittersweet Orange & Luminous Grey, November Slips in Soft & Dreamy . . .

November 1st, 2013 § 1

November First - Michaela Medina Harlow - thegardenerseden.comRain & Fog Softly Slip the Forest into November

A stormy All Hallow’s Eve gave way to a soft, dove-grey dawn; bare treetops shrouded in luminous mist and wet roads strewn with bittersweet leaves. Lost in the sheer delight of driving foggy backroads home to my Vermont studio, I had to stop here and there just to breathe in the scent of autumn musk and listen to raindrops as they fell through November’s sweet, first morning stillness . . .

November First, WoodsRoad - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Dove Grey Voile Drapes Above the Forest’s Bittersweet Carpet

Photography & Textⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All photographs, artwork, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of Michaela Medina Harlow and/or The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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A Riverside Cemetery Stroll at Sunset & Melancholy Musings on All Hallow’s Eve

October 31st, 2013 § 2

Riverside Cemetery  - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comAll Hallow’s Eve Sweeps in with a Chill, Beneath the Stained Glass Canopy of Autumn (Acer palmatum at Riverside Cemetery, Massachusetts, established 1714)

In the late days of October and early November —as fog sweeps across the fields and chilly frost settles in the valleys— melancholy thoughts begin to stir. Autumn is a beautiful time of year, but its beauty is owed, at least in part, to a certain sadness. This is a season of endings; of lengthening shadows, falling leaves, frost-blackened seedpods and departing songbirds. New England’s distinct and dramatic seasonal shifts have always invited poetic musings. In the garden, we celebrate these annual changes; understanding that however somber, there is beauty in endings as well as beginnings. With low, slanting light filtering through a canopy of brilliant fall foliage —red, orange and gold playing against slate grey tombstones— cemeteries in the Northeast are particularly beautiful places for contemplative, autumn strolls.

In honor of All Hallow’s Eve, a sunset stroll through Riverside Cemetery . . .

Sunlight, Riverside Cemetery, October, 2013 - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Backlit Tombstones - Riverside Cemetery, Sunderland, MA, October 2013 - michaela medina harlow

Last Light - Riverside Cemetery, Sunderland, MA. October, 2013 - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Sunset at Riverside Cemetery - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Riverside Cemetery - Sunlit Canopy - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Riverside Cemetery at Sunset - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Riverside Cemetery - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Beneath Autumn's Canopy - Riverside Cemetery - Sunderland, MA 2013 - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

bye, bye, birdie - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Like this post? You may also enjoy previous All Hallow’s Eve entries. Explore a few more, below . . .

Liz-Forest-Hills-Engulfed Haunting Forest Hills Cemetery with Photographer Liz Kelleher

Once Upon a Midnight Dreary .... ⓒ michaela medina - thegardenersedenOnce Upon a Midnight Dreary

Nice Mr. Gnome... Stay Right There... ⓒ Michaela at TGEWhen Darkness Falls: Revenge of Wolfie, the Garden Gnome 

Ravens ⓒ 2012 michaela medina - thegardenerseden.comDarkness Falls Across the Land

Corn Tassles 2010.10.20.12.17.09.corn maze.harlow.5166He Who Walks Behind the Rows, with Photographer Tim Geiss

Photography & Text, Main Story: ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. Other Images as Noted and Linked. All photographs, artwork, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of Michaela Medina Harlow and/or The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Through Autumn’s Golden Mist . . .

October 30th, 2013 § 2

Through Golden Mist - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Wild Wonders, Through the Golden Mist of Autumn

For all the beautiful, ornate gardens I’ve visited —filled with the finest follies, walls, arches, topiaries and hedges— my greatest inspiration remains Mother Nature and her wild wonder; seen here through Autumn’s golden mist . . .

Through Golden Mist ll - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Autumn’s Antique, Tea-Stained Lace Bathed in Morning Light, Like Milk & Honey

Through Golden Mist lll - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Slipping Through a Flickering Arch, Into the Misty Hollow

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Sunday Musings on Art & Garden Design

October 20th, 2013 § 2

Golden October Halesia Leaves - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comGolden Silverbell Leaves (Halesia tetraptera) on the Sunlit Terrace

It’s Sunday, and after a several weeks of intense fall planting —and many more to go— I decided to give my hard-working muscles a day off. I spent a quiet morning and luxurious, early afternoon sipping coffee, enjoying a home-cooked breakfast and musing on the relationship between art and garden design. I’ve been thinking about this subject a great deal lately, because as both garden designer and professional artist, I often find myself struggling to find balance and separation between the two worlds.

Rudbeckia fulgida, Amsonia illustris, Physocarpus opulifolius and Other Autumn Favorites in the Entry Garden - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Texture and Color Play are Great Ways to Extend Season-Spanning Interest in Perennial Gardens. As a Painter, I Love how the Chocolatey Pom-Pom Remnants of Rudbeckia fulgida, Echo the Dark Mystery of Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Summer Wine’, and how the Feathery, Citrus-Hued Foliage of Amsonia illustris Brings out the Purplish Cast in Both Plants

Those of you who know me personally, and some long-time followers of this journal, are aware that in addition to my work in landscape and garden design, I am a painter. During the growing season —late April through mid November here in New England— I spend the vast majority of my days designing and planting gardens. Come winter, I switch aprons and move back into my art studio full time. I have been exhibiting and selling my drawings and paintings for near twenty years, but it has taken me awhile to feel comfortable linking the two careers online. These creative passions are constantly informing one another, of course, and suddenly, I feel an irrepressible urge to unite and present them as one.

Blackhaw Viburnum and King Cycas in the Turquoise Pot - October - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Blackhaw (Viburnum prunifolium) Leaves Catch the Morning Light at the Edge of the Steel Balcony. A Potted King Sago (Cycas revoluta), Basks in a Turquoise Pot, Just Beyond

Hydrangea paniculata 'Limelight' and Halesia tetraptera in October Sunlight - Michaela Medina Harlow - thegardenerseden.com  Along the Studio Walk, Hydrangea paniculata, Acer palmatum and Halesia tetraptera Share a Moment of Brilliant October Sunlight

Viburnum trilobum, Miscanthus sinensis and Lindera benzoin in the Front Entrance Garden - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Fall Colors and Textures in the Studio Entry Garden: Miscanthus sinensis, Viburnum trilobum, Lindera benzoin, Rudbeckia hirta Remnants and a Carpet-Edge of Sedum ‘Angelina’

Over the coming weeks, you will begin to see a blending and merging of my professional worlds. Not surprisingly, my paintings —like my photographs— are inspired by the landscape, natural elements and botanical world. A lifetime spent studying, sketching, drawing and painting the lines, shapes, textures and colors of the landscape has directly influenced the way in which I design and select individual plants for gardens. I’ll be creating a separate page for my artwork on the left sidebar —with links to my other website— to connect these two parts of myself.  And in addition to regular inclusion of my photography (which is a very new form of artistic expression for me), I’ll be sharing more landscape sketches and drawings, as well as studio paintings, here. I hope you will enjoy the addition of more artwork to this site.

Eupatorium rugosum 'Chocolate' with Euphorbia polychroma and Rudbeckia hirta - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Panicum virgatum ‘Heavy Metal’, Eupatorium rugosum ‘Chocolate’, Euphorbia polychroma and Rudbeckia hirta in the Front Entry Garden

Garden photos above were all taken with iPhone 4.

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Hunter Moon & Butterscotch Beech

October 18th, 2013 § 2

Full Hunter Moon - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Full, Hunter Moon, Rising Through Butterscotch-Hued Beech Leaves

Busy with end-of-season garden design work and autumn planting, I’ve had little time this month to write or update the site with photos. Hopefully, I’ll have a few moments to play catch up and share some ongoing projects and autumn scenes over the weekend.

And having lost all track of the celestial calendar, I was taken by surprise tonight —as if channeled straight from a forest fairytale—  when I caught the full, Hunter Moon rising through the butterscotch-hued leaves of October. What a beautiful sight. I hope you are enjoying the beauty and warmth of these sweet autumn evenings . . .

Hunter Moon 2013 - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com A Beautiful, October Moonrise in Vermont

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Above the New England Landscape: October’s Kaleidoscopic Splendor . . .

October 6th, 2013 § 4

Aerial View of Autumn Above Lake Whitingham, Vermont - Michaela Medina Harlow - thegardenerseden.com Above Lake Whitingham, Wilmington, Vermont Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

It goes without saying that autumn in New England is simply beautiful. But this year —perhaps because of the abundant rainfall or lack of high winds or delayed frost— is one of the most spectacular foliage seasons that I can remember. The blazing scarlet and brilliant orange maples, clear-gold birch and poplar, and technicolor ash trees are absolutely amazing in Southern Vermont and Northwestern Massachusetts this fall. My autumn planting schedule has been truly wild, but I promised myself some time in the air and I got it this past week. Clear, blue skies and peak autumn hues made for a stunning hour-long flight above the valley. Here’s a bit of what I saw, and couldn’t help but share: October in New England, from inside the sky . . .

Punctuated Autumn Landscape - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comPunctuated Autumn Landscape, Guilford, Vermont Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

Pumpkin Harvest - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Pumpkin Harvest, Deerfield, Massachusetts Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

Heart of the Field - Michaela Medina Harlow - thegardenerseden.com  Heart of the Field, Guilford, Vermont Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

Keyhole Swamp, Vernon, Vermont - Michaela Medina Harlow - thegardenerseden.com Keyhole Swamp, Vernon, Vermont Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

Golden River Bank - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Golden River Bank, Northfield, Massachusetts  Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

Autumn Color Bands, Vermont - Michaela Medina Harlow - thegardenerseden.com Autumn Color Bands, Above Guilford, Vermont Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

Autumn Colorbands ll, Above Guilford, Vermont - Michaela Medina Harlow - thegardenerseden.com  Autumn Color Bands II, Above Guilford, Vermont Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

Autumn Color and Farm Fields, Above Deerfield, Massachusetts - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Streaked Fields, Deerfield, Massachusetts Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

Tractor and Autumn Fields, Above Massachusetts - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Autumn Above the Fields, Northfield, Massachusetts Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

October Blue, Newfane, Vermont - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com October’s Inky Blue Heart, Newfane, Vermont Ⓒ 2013 Michaela M. Harlow

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

Special thanks to flypionnervalley.com for professional stick & rudder skills.

flypioneervalley.com

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Hello, October . . .

October 2nd, 2013 § 2

Raydon's Favorite Aster with Amsonia and Flame Grass - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comAster oblongifolium ‘Raydon’s Favorite’

Speckless, blue skies, fiery foliage, brilliant light, colorful gourds and pumpkins, musky woodland walks, sparkling frosts, moody fog banks, starry nights, wood smoke and hot, mulled apple cider; hello October. Your beauty is simply beyond compare . . .

Tea Viburnum fruits (Viburnum setigerum) with Maiden Grass Tassels (Miscanthus sinensis) - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Tea Viburnum Fruits Shimmer and Shine, Brilliant Orange Against the Buff Tassels of Maiden Grass (Viburnum setigerum & Miscanthus sinensis in October Light)

Miscanthus sinensis in October Light - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Maiden Grass Tassels Catch the Low Light of Autumn (Miscanthus sinensis )

Viburnum lentago (Nannyberry Viburnum) and Lophocampa caryae (Hickory Tussock Moth) - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comNannyberry Viburnum (V. lentago) and Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Lophocampa caryae) 

Golden Amsonia hubrichtii & Blackened Seedpods of Rudbeckia hirta - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Amsonia hubrichtii and Rudbeckia hirta 

David Austin Rosa 'Bibi Maizoon' and Sedum 'Autumn Joy' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Roses of Autumn: David Austin Rosa ‘Bibi Maizoon’ and Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

Tasseled Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis) - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Let the Big Razzle Dazzle Begin!

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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What Time Is It, Mr. Fox?

September 26th, 2013 Comments Off

Red Fox in Meadow - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comA Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes) Peers, Curiously at Me, Through a Grassy Meadow

There are many things I enjoy about working outdoors, but the opportunity to spot wildlife ranks near the top. Recently, while scoping out the site of a new garden design project, a friend spotted this young red fox (pictured above), peering out from the edge of a grassy margin, where woodland meets meadow. Swift moving and stealthy, fox are usually difficult to capture in photos. However, the youthful curiosity of this young fella seemed to override his natural fear, allowing me a moment to snap a quick picture. I later learned from my clients that this fox was born in early spring —not far from where I captured this photo— in a hillside den.

Red fox are opportunistic omnivores —feeding on rodents, birds, fish, or even fruits and vegetables— and adaptable hunters, with wide-ranging habitat; from forests to grasslands and desert regions. Listen to the fox’s bark and read more fox facts at National Geographic, here. According to Discovery.com, scientists have recently discovered that the red fox uses the earth’s magnetic field to aid in hunting. Learn more —and watch an amazing and comical video of a fox diving head-first into snow, to capture mice stirring, three feet below— by visiting Discovery.com here.

What wildlife are you spotting in the garden?

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Welcoming Autumn’s Colorful Splendor

September 23rd, 2013 Comments Off

Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eiler's' Coneflower - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comRudbeckia subtomentosa  &  Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens

Welcoming the Warmth & Brilliance of Autumn’s Kaleidoscopic Splendor on the First Day of Fall. Let the Technicolor Spectacle Begin! 

Meadow Border with Shasta Viburnum, Flame Grass and Coneflower in Autumn - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com  The Meadow Border Catches Fire to Burn Through the Equinox (Amsonia hubrichtii, Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum), Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens, Rudbeckia subtomentosa, Juniperus pfitzeriana )

Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens & Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eiler's' in September - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Viburnum trilobum, Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens & Rudbeckia subtomentosa at Meadow’s Edge

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Celebrating the Swan Song of Summer: Grilled Peaches with Blue Cheese, Caramelized Onions & Pecans . . .

September 22nd, 2013 Comments Off

Grilled Peaches stuffed with Blue Cheese, Caramelized Onions and Pecans with Balsamic Glaze - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Grilled Peaches with Blue Cheese, Caramelized Onions, Toasted Pecans & Balsamic Glaze

Gloria Peaches at Scott Farm Orchard - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comGloria Peaches at Scott Farm Orchard, Vermont. According to Scott Farm orchard manager, Zeke Goodband, these beautiful, sweet, firm-fleshed peaches are the perfect choice for grilling and roasting!

Scott Farm Peaches in a Bowl - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comBeautiful Scott Farm Peaches, Almost too Good to Eat

Oh summer, summer, summer . . .Where have you gone? As I sit here in my garden chair —surveying the red-tipped Viburnum leaves and orange-tinted Flame Grass— once again I marvel at the quick passage of time. In just a few short hours, autumn will officially begin in the Northern Hemisphere, (20:44 UTC or 4:44 pm ET). Much as I love the fall —always my favorite season— this year I feel more than a touch of melancholy as I let sweet summer go.

Hydrangea paniculata 'Limelight' in Autumn - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Blushing Limelight Hydrangea (H. paniculata ‘Limelight’) in the Garden this Morning

Canada Geese and Harvest Moon - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com  Canada Geese Slip Away by the Light of the Full Harvest Moon

Miscanthus sinensis 'Morning Light' in late summer - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Morning Light Maiden Grass Dances in the Cool Breeze (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’)

Although this has been a rather cool and rainy season, the months were also filled with warm riches and delights; kayaking on the river, a trip to Block Island, Christmas-in-July fireworks, a picnic in the orchard at Scott Farm, milestone family birthdays, and exciting projects at work. This has also been a year of culinary exploration and adventures thanks to delightful produce from my kitchen garden and fruit from nearby farms.

Swan Song of Summer - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Swan Song of Summer 

Recently, after picking up fresh, late-season peaches from Zeke Goodband at Scott Farm, in Dummerston, Vermont, I decided to experiment with savory recipes featuring this delightful fruit. Grilling peaches has always been a favorite late-summer pastime, and after sampling a delicious appetizer of blue cheese, caramelized onion and pecan stuffed peaches at Magpie Restaurant in nearby Greenfield, Massachusetts, I decided to give the idea a whirl. Simple to prepare and delicious as an appetizer or side dish, these grilled, stuffed peaches are the perfect way to say farewell to summertime.

So as we listen to the swan-song of summer —crickets in the meadow and bluejays in the scrub— here’s a touch of sweetness to send the gentle season on her way . . .

Grilled and Stuffed Peaches on Platter with Balsamic Glaze - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Grilled Peaches with Blue Cheese, Caramelized Onions, Toasted Pecans & Balsamic Glaze

 Appetizer or Light Side for Six

Ingredients

6 Large Gloria Peaches (sliced in half & pitted, skin on)

1/8 cup Pecans (toasted, chopped fine)

1 small, sweet onion, caramelized and chopped fine

1/4 cup Crumbled Blue Cheese (or more)

Salt to taste

Butter for Grilling

Balsamic Glaze for Drizzling Platter

Grilling Peaches - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com

Method

Caramelize onions, chop/toast pecans, and crumble high-quality blue cheese in advance. Mix the three ingredients together in a small bowl and salt lightly to taste. Set aside.

Slice and pit peaches. Scoop out center neatly to make a bit of room for stuffing if pits are small, and set aside on a platter for grilling. If grilling over flame, brush peaches with melted butter and set on medium-hot grill, away from direct flame. If grilling indoors (Foreman grill or the like), heat the grill and then rub with butter. Grill the peaches until fragrant and soft, but still firm. Remove from heat and fill each peach with a tablespoon or more of stuffing. Arrange on platter and drizzle with balsamic glaze. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Grilled, Stuffed Peaches with Blue Cheese, Caramelized Onions, Pecans and Balsamic Glaze - Michaela Medina Harlow - thegardenerseden.com Grilled, Stuffed Peaches Make a Great Appetizer or Side Dish with Other Grilled Foods. Serve Warm or at Room Temperature.

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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On the Magic of Harvest Moon . . .

September 18th, 2013 Comments Off

Harvest Moon - Michaela Medina Harlow - thegardenerseden.comMoonrise and Maiden Grass in the September Garden

Last night I caught moonrise —growing full and bright in sunset’s afterglow— in the garden as I scrambled to cover heirloom tomatoes and ripening bell peppers before dusk. With clear skies and a threat of frost in the evening air, it seems that autumn is arriving prematurely this year.

The Harvest Moon, more typically associated with autumn, is also early; making a late-summer appearance this year. Full at 7:12 am on September 19th, the moon will appear full as she rises tonight, September 18, at 6:13 pm ET and tomorrow night, September 19, at 6:45 pm. The Harvest Moon is so-named for its historic, agricultural importance; allowing additional light to farmers harvesting crops late into the evening. This much-anticipated celestial event is the closest full moon to the September 22, autumnal equinox (fall begins this year at 20:44 UTC, read more at EarthSky.org, here).

Although not-quite-full, the Harvest Moon was stunning last night as it rose beyond the Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis purpurascens) in my garden. So spread out your blanket and mull some cider, it’s certain to be a glorious show over the next few nights!

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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September’s Most Stylish Party Goers: Fashionably Late-Season Flowers . . .

September 18th, 2013 § 4

Rosa de Rescht - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comNorthern Climes can be a Challenge for Rose Lovers, but Rosa de Rescht Likes to Close Out a Party, Ending the Summer Season with a  Midnight Kiss from Jack Frost

Though sweet Summer shall stay with us a few more days, Autumn’s perfume swirls about in the chilly evening air. There’s no denying now that the seasons are about to change. This is the time of year when foliage takes center stage, but a few blossoming starlets will remain, occasionally stealing the spotlight in the late show, from now until deepest freeze. WindflowerFairy Candles, Yellow Wax BellsAsters, Bush Clover and Toad Lilies; some of my favorite flowers bloom at this time of year.

I’ve featured a few of these favorites before —or related cultivars— but as they are coming into their own again, I thought their delightful blossoms worthy of a September review. Come take a stroll and enjoy the warmth of a late summer afternoon . . .

Sweet Autumn Clematis - Clematis paniculata - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Sweet Autumn Clematis (C. paniculata/C.terniflora), Scrambles up the Trellis and Blooms to Beat the Band Beside My Studio Door

Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com She’s No Wallflower: Rudbeckia subtomentosa ‘Henry Eilers’ Dips but Never Flops at Meadow’s Edge

Late Summer Meadow Beauties - Asteracea and Solidago - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com The Moody Overcast of Changing Seasons Does Nothing to Dull the Beauty of Native Asters and Goldenrod, Swaying with Wooly Rush in the Meadow

Rudbeckia fulgida 'Goldsturm' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Late-Season Black-Eyed Susan, Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’ Plays Sweetly with the Low, Ruby-Glow of Heuchera Leaves

Ligularia dentata 'Britt-Marie Crawford' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.comDrama-Queen Ligularia dentata ‘Britt-Marie Crawford Struts Her Deep-Maroon Satin & Gold,Feather Collar in the Secret Garden

Ligularia dentata 'Britt-Marie Crawford' in the Secret Garden. - michaela medina  harlow - thegardenerseden.com Sunshine on a Cloudy Day, Provided by Ligularia dentata ‘Britt-Marie Crawford’

Secret Garden in September - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Colorful Foliage & Flowers —Shades of Chartreuse, Lime, Burgundy and Olive— Lights Up the Mossy, Secret Garden Path and Highlight Late-Summer Through Autumn Blooms

Actaea simplex 'Hillside Black Beauty' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Fashionably Late Fairy Candles Sway in Wind Song as Summer Waltzes Toward Autumn

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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Morning Coffee with the Eastern Phoebe

September 5th, 2013 § 2

Eastern Phoebe - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com An Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe), Perches Upon the Rusty Metal Garden Bench in Front of Lespedeza thunbergii ‘Edo Shibori’

As part of an ongoing effort to savor every last drop of summer, I’ve vowed to take my work and meals outside whenever possible. For the past few days, I’ve been lured out to coffee on the sunny, stone terrace by the perky morning song of an Eastern Phoebe. A few years ago, this friendly, summertime garden resident built a nest beneath the steel balcony —just above the Secret Garden door— which it refurbishes and reuses each year.

If you are new to birding, the Eastern Phoebe is a relatively easy species to ID. One of the earliest of the migratory birds to return to my garden in springtime, and one of the last to depart in autumn, this flycatcher likes to announce itself —often, rather loudly— by calling out its name, “Phoebe, Phoebe, Phoebe”. Lately, I find one or the other member of this pair, twitching its tail on the armrest of my rusty garden bench. Although it’s an omnivore —consuming small fruits and nuts in addition to live prey— the Phoebe’s diet consists mainly of flying insects; including flies, beetles, moths, wasps and ticks as well as other insects and arachnids. Some years the Phoebes raise two broods in their moss-lined nest; making the Secret Garden a fun spot to observe fledglings as they experiment with new, wobbly wings.

Eastern Phoebes - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Eastern Phoebe and Family in a Moss-Lined Nest Above the Secret Garden Door 

Listen to songs and calls, view photos and videos and learn more about the Eastern Phoebe and other bird species on Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s website,  All About Birds, by clicking here.

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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September Charmer: Chelone lyonii’s Late-Blooming Beauty Spans the Seasons

September 2nd, 2013 Comments Off

Chelone lyonii 'Hot Lips' with Hydrangea paniculata 'Limelight' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Chelone lyonii ‘Hot Lips’ with Lovely ‘Limelight’ Hydrangea (H. paniculata)

September is a mostly summer month, and yet, there’s something about Labor Day weekend that signals the unofficial start of fall. Well, much as I love autumn, I’m just not ready yet and neither is my garden! Although the beds and borders look a bit blowzier —tidy mounds of springtime green now spilling voluptuous into the walkways— there are still plenty of blossoming beauties to be found in September. One of my favorite transitional blooms? She’s a lipstick-pink-clad, girly-girl known as Chelone lyonii ‘Hot Lips’; one of my favorites for late-summer to early-fall color in the garden.

Turtlehead - Chelone lyonii 'Hot Lips' Blossom - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Chelone lyonii’s Beauty Transcends the Seasons with Gorgeous, Deep Green, Leathery Foliage and Long-Lasting, Vibrant Blooms

Native to the wetlands and moist, shady woodland regions of eastern North America, Chelone lyonii is hardy in USDA zones 3-8. With shiny, deep-green foliage and mid-size stature —2′ high and wide at maturity— this is a great perennial for filling the center of a semi-shade border or for naturalizing in difficult, water-logged sites. A fast-maturing, reliable August-September bloomer, turtlehead is the perfect perennial for impatient gardeners.

Because of her lovely, leathery foliage and late-seaon bloom, Cheloni lyonii combines well with many other perennials, shrubs and ornamental grasses. Try placing her in mixed company as a mid-border plant with Little Lime or Limelight Hydrangea (H. paniculata cvs) in the background and Japanese Forest Grass (Hakonechloa macra cvs), up front. She also pairs beautifully with silver-tinted foliage and black seedpods of Wild Blue Indigo (Baptisia australis). If your garden has moist soil and gets a bit of morning light, but is partially protected from hot afternoon sun, try Turtlehead in combination with Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis cvs), as a backup and   place a bit of Lady’s Mantle (Alchemilla mollis), Foamy Bells (Tiarella species) Coral Bells (Heuchra species & hybrids), at her feet to add some mound shapes and edge the border. Spring-bloomers with season-spanning foliage and other textural plants make great companions for late-season flowers. In my garden, I’ve paired Turtlehead with Fairy Candles (Actaea simplex cvs), Yellow Wax Bells (Kirengeshoma palmata), Rodgersia, Ligularia ‘Britt Marie Crawford’, Bethlehem Sage (Pulmonaria species & hybrids), Barrenwort (Epimedium), Bugloss (Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’ and other cvs) Japanese Painted Fern (Athyrium nipponicum)  Ghost Fern (Athyrium  x ‘Ghost’), Cinnamon Fern (Osmunda cinnamonea), Sedge (Carex species).

Turtlehead - Chelone lyonii 'Hot Lips' - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com At Maturity, Chelone lyonii ‘Hot Lips’ forms a Compact 2′ x 2′ Clump – Perfect for Mid-Border Placement in Semi Shade Gardens or Naturalized in a Damp, Cool Spot Beneath a High Canopy of Trees

Turtlehead’s snap-dragon like blossoms make great cut-flowers, and as an added bonus, this bubble-gum pink beauty attracts and supports a wide-range of late-season pollinators; including butterflies, bumblebees and hummingbirds. Although it remains upright in my garden, Chelone lyonii may need a bit of staking in some situations. Although largely pest and disease resistant, I did notice a bit of grasshopper damage this year (what is it with those hungry critters this season?). For best performance, mature clumps should be lifted, divided and replanted in replenished soil once every three years. Once established, a seasonal dressing of mature compost and thick mulch are all this pretty, reliable, late-summer knock-out desires to remain content for many years.

Why not invite a pink-lipstick wearing gal to your end-of-summer garden party? She’s cheerful, pretty and mingles well with others. I think she’s great company!

Turtlehead - Chelone lyonii 'Hot Lips' with Bumblebee - michaela medina harlow - thegardenerseden.com Like Many Late-Blooming, North American Native Perennials, Chelone lyonii Provides Critical Support to Butterflies, Bees and Other Pollinators. On a Late Summer Day, Blossoms are Buzzing with Bumblebees and Hummingbirds

Garden Design & Photography Michaela Medina Harlow – Click Here for Information

Photography & Text ⓒ Michaela Medina Harlow/The Gardener’s Eden. All images, articles and content on this site (with noted exceptions), are the original, copyrighted property of The Gardener’s Eden and may not be reposted, reproduced or used in any way without prior written consent. Contact information is in the left side bar. Please do not take my photographs without asking first. Thank you! 

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